Razer Blade 15.6" (GTX 1060/1070, 2018 edition) Owner's Lounge

Discussion in 'Razer' started by X33nbat, May 20, 2018.

  1. Muezick

    Muezick Notebook Consultant

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    That is cool as **** dude. I wish I knew more about VMs and ****. I have a hard time believing that the razer can run xp easily, VM or not, but good luck to you ! Maybe try literally dual booting? I assume you don't need anything but the tp/kb/screen and usb ports to work to do the robot job and the laptop has two drive bays XD
     
  2. RobotDoctor

    RobotDoctor Notebook Consultant

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    VMs are pretty easy to create. I use VMWare and have a legitimate copy of MS XP Pro. It is getting difficult to get a activation key from MS for XP now but there are ways around that. You have to install XP the same way you would any computer and it works pretty well. The best thing about the virtual machine is that it will use the USB ports on my Blade. All I have to do is attach them from the host to the VM. I can even use a USB serial adapter. I have a driver that is loaded from the XP machine and, viola, it functions perfectly. My virtual XP machine is up and running but now has to be loaded with the software I need to run, including the USB serial adapter driver. I am not a huge fan of duel boot systems. This was done in the past (maybe in the late 90s and early 2000s) but I haven't had a dual boot system since the late 90s.

    The problem I have is the installation process, transferring licenses, setup of applications when I change computer. In this case it was a change from SATA to NVMe so cloning was probably out of the question. The reason for the change was due to a failed trial of Apple Duet software installation and degraded performance of my computer (which was running pretty well before the Duet installation). While the SATA was fast, the NVMe is just a bit faster but in itself not worth a change without problem. I went with the NVMe option because of the time it would have taken my computer out of service and the cost associated to downtime. That was my justification of getting another m.2 ssd. I could configure the NVMe at my leisure (after the work day for an hour or two) while having the SATA in use while I was working. Once I get everything on the NVMe fully loaded, licensed, and functional in every capacity I need I will format the SATA and keep it as a backup. I wouldn't be able to recoup much from it so it's worth it as a spare.
     
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  3. Muezick

    Muezick Notebook Consultant

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    I have done this before! It's not out of the question. I thought it would have problems too, but it just worked!

    But either way, those Razerblade Base models all ship with 128 or 256gb ssd's, could have easily acquired a 512 or 1tb sata m.2 and stuffed it in there XD. First thing I did when I got my base model was upgrade the drive to a 1tb nvme. Sounds like you already bought the upgraded nvme drive, but you know, for the future i guess!

    Also, I know you already said you were going to keep it, but its good to keep original equipment for warranty purposes. If you ever have to send it in, having that stuff to put back into the machine when you send it in is a great option, especially considering how often these laptop manufacturers like to upgrade you to different/better models when yours just wont work right for X reason. If I bought faster memory and a bigger SSD for my machine and they were like "Lmao we're just gonna send you a different one" i'd be mad!

    Any ways, what you do is amazing, cheers dude. Hope it all gets working smoothly for you!
     
  4. RobotDoctor

    RobotDoctor Notebook Consultant

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    I bought the SATA base model (128gb m.2, 1tb hhd). You're right, Razer could have gone with larger capacity drives but then the costs would have risen. I am sure they got the 128gb/256gb drives very inexpensively in large quantity. I have both my original drives in my desk drawer protected just in case I have to send back the unit for what ever reason. I did get a 2tb SATA and cloned the original drive to it. That worked very well and was very easy. However, this time around I went from SATA to NVMe so cloning might not be the best option due to the difference in ssds. Also, with the residual software/driver/unknown issue going on I wasn't interested in cloning because I did not want to migrate that into my new m.2 ssd. As I said, the new m.2 NVMe is running well and is fast. I just need to deactivate some licenses from the SATA drive and activate the software on my NVMe drive.
     
  5. Goracij

    Goracij Notebook Enthusiast

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    Does anyone know for sure the thicknesses of thermal pads for 2018 RB15? Not sure about #1-3 and 7-9.
    From what I got memory chips should have 1.5mm pads (4-6). But 1.5mm seemed to be to thin for #1 and #3. The #2 was barely touching heatsink with 1.5mm pad as well when I was using such a pad there. Should #2 be 2mm as well? I'm using Gelid GP Extreme everywhere - they seem to be soft enough and more or less tacky (not like original pads, but better then some others).
    Anyway, comments on my list of pads' dimensions will be appreciated (numbers according to image):
    1). 2mm
    2). 2mm ???
    3). 2mm
    4-6). 1.5mm
    7). 1.5mm ????
    8). 1.5mm ????
    9). 1mm ????

    UPDATE: After some tries I found that 2mm for #2 thermal pad is too much. As for #7 - 1.5mm works fine. But for #8 pads of 1.5mm are almost on the edge - if one would use rigid pads those would not allow for #7 to stick properly. But when I tried to use 1mm on #8 - the edge pad on one of the chips didn't touch the heatsink. So I used pads of the next thicknesses:
    1). 2mm
    2). 1.5mm
    3). 2mm
    4-6). 1.5mm
    7). 1.5mm
    8). soft 1.5mm, or 1mm hard pad
    9). 1mm, but the one that is very tacky (or use a small piece of the original pad from gpu memory, that's what I did)
    RB15 heatsink and thermal pads v2.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2019
  6. RobotDoctor

    RobotDoctor Notebook Consultant

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    Is there a driver or download that can be installed to improve battery management for a 2018 RB base model? I did a fresh install with Win10Pro and the battery life seems to worse than off the original (cloned) ssd. Thanks in advance.
     
  7. RobotDoctor

    RobotDoctor Notebook Consultant

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    Not sure what happened to the speakers but they went silent. I restored a restore point from yesterday and all is now well. Definitely a driver issue and the driver from the Razer site didn't help. Oh well, good thing I have been diligent in creating restore points.
     
  8. rinneh

    rinneh Notebook Prophet

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    there is no battery driver. but make sure MSI afterburner isnt turned on, it wakes up the GPU constantly and drains battery.
     
  9. RobotDoctor

    RobotDoctor Notebook Consultant

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    I don't have MSI afterburner installed on my RB15. I am a business application user not a gamer so I have not made any changes to clock speeds, bios settings, nothing. I am still looking to see what I can do to extend battery life. I am getting about 3 hours running basic applications (MS Office, web browsing, text editor, Acrobat Adobe). I only have one application set to run the GPU (offline Robotic programming software). If I am running a basic robot cell with minimal graphic geometries added I can get away with integrated graphics. When a robot cell has a lot of graphic geometries added then the GPU runs the application better. While I realize I have a gaming laptop and one with a smaller battery (due to dual ssd), I expect better than 3 hours when running on low graphic/battery saver mode.

    Thanks for the tip on MSI afterburner. :)
     
  10. No0B

    No0B Notebook Consultant

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    @RobotDoctor, As soon as the Nvidia GPU turns on, your battery time will plummet. So the tip with MSI Afterburner is valuable. Personally, to avoid having the monitoring running in the background, I have a Windows task set up to call orbmu2k's Nvidia Inspector with a few parameters to apply my voltage/frequency curve and memory clock offset and then close itself immediately. Nothing else ever touches these numbers usually, so the overclock sticks just fine.

    The other thing to look out for is the CPU package power, since you have only little control over what the rest of the system takes (aside from screen brightness). I'd recommend getting ThrottleStop and setting up a Windows task to start it on every boot to apply an undervolt and provide some monitoring capabilities. ThrottleStop will prominently show you the package power metric, which is not very accurate, but it's better than nothing. I'd take the time to set up an undervolt fitting to your stability requirements, in order for the CPU to utilize a little less power when under load. There you'll also be able to enable Speed Shift, which not only replaces the SpeedStep software with a hardware implementation (which is faster at switching between clock speeds and uses less power by bring on the hardware-side), but also gives finer control over the clock speed you're expecting for your task via ThrottleStop's SpeedShift EPP value. ThrottleStop also has profiles, which you can use to automatically let it switch between a more permissive profile in terms of power when the charger is plugged in and a conservative profile when it's on battery. You can even set up different voltage offset values per profile.

    The last thing ThrottleStop would help you with is C-states. I've written "yet another BIOS mod"-guide here a while back, because I wanted to unlock the deeper C-states in the BIOS for the CPU to disable parts of itself when its idle, in order to conserve energy. Since then Razer has enabled switched the hidden BIOS option for CPUs to go down into the deepest C-state (C10) if possible, but depending on your Windows install, background tasks and whether you have a BIOS version where that option is set correctly, your CPU might remain in C2 or something, where most of the CPU still has current going through it. This will only improve power draw at almost idle, but it gave me personally a good boost in those situations. Again, you can use ThrottleStop's profiles to limit the CPU to C3 for example when plugged in, so there are fewer disabled parts of the CPU to wake up from sleep, and let it go down to C10 if it could when on battery. The CPU will automatically decide which C-state to go to depending on what it's doing at the moment, but it will automatically try to reach the deepest one up to the provided limit.

    For me, at idle, the CPU package takes about 0.3-0.5W according to ThrottleStop. This should generally be the case with Coffee Lake CPUs such as the 8750H. If you can't reach numbers like that no matter what, you either leave it be, or look at Sysinternals Process Monitor to figure out whether you still have drivers running rampant or background tasks taking up CPU time when they shouldn't.
     
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