RAID 0 SSDs - worse performance?

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Lightning_-, Dec 1, 2018.

  1. Lightning_-

    Lightning_- Notebook Geek

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    I got two 2TB Crucial MX500 SATA SSDs on to replace my internal storage drives, of which are HDDs. OS is on a separate NVMe Drive. After installing the 2 blank ssds, I put them in RAID 0 using storage spaces in Windows 10. But RAID 0 didn't seem to offer much performance gains, and even did worse in the last two 4K tests.

    Am I possibly missing something to boost RAID 0 performance, and will configuring RAID via BIOS be
    better?
    upload_2018-11-30_22-38-0.png upload_2018-11-30_22-38-0.png
     
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  2. Ultra Male

    Ultra Male Super Tweaker

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    I always configure the RAID in the BIOS.

    Never had any performance issues your 4K Random Read/Write is horrible.

    Also, I set the Data Stripe Size to 64K which gives the best balance of performance in workflows ranging from small to large files.

    These are my IRST Settings:

    [​IMG]

    AS SSD Benchmark 3x 960 PRO

    [​IMG]

    You also didn't mention what is your Intel Rapid Storage Technology version
     
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  3. Ultra Male

    Ultra Male Super Tweaker

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  4. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Like UltraMale said you must set Stripe to 64K and it feels RAID 0 isn't activated and configured properly through IRST. Use IRST 16.7.x and make sure you uninstall older IRST before installing new ones. I don't know if uninstalling IRST removes disk arrays. If it does, just upgrade the IRST driver through inf/setup.exe in IRST package.
    Also make sure most drivers are UWP or modern framework based to extract max performance. Use MEI from win-raid,Network drivers, chipset software(optional),touchpad,sd card(station-drivers) etc..
     
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  5. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKS = That sucks! Dont wast your $ on FILTHY

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  6. Lightning_-

    Lightning_- Notebook Geek

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    Thanks. My IRST is 16.7.9.1027. But I'm probably missing the RAID drivers - how do I obtain them for my particular RST version?

    The thing is, when I created the array in the BIOS under IRST menu, it wouldn't boot to Windows even though my OS is on a separate Samsung 950 Pro.

    Basically my BIOS settings after creating the firmware RAID were:
    Sata config: RAID
    Boot: UEFI

    What would be the correct procedure to get firmware RAID working in this case?
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2018
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  7. Ultra Male

    Ultra Male Super Tweaker

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    You don't need to install the RAID Drivers separately as it's already included in the Intel Rapid Storage Technology app but what you can do is place a copy of the RAID Driver (Extracted offcourse) in your Windows 10 USB Installation Disk.

    also, when you download any file from the internet, make sure you follow this guide to unblock the file and/or any ZIP file before extracting it:

    "Are you sure you want to run this file?" [Yes or No]

    Here's how I do it:

    1) Set the boot mode in your BIOS to Intel Rapid Storage (AKA RAID)
    2) Create the RAID Array from the BIOS for the required SSDs and set the Data Stripe Size to 64K
    3) Boot from the Windows 10 Installation Disk
    4) When it prompts you to install Windows and shows you the drive, don't create the partition yet, instead, hit Load Driver then navigate to the root of your Windows 10 USB Flash Disk then point it to the folder which contains the RAID Driver and let it load the first driver (you usually see 2 choices)
    5) Now create the partition and install Windows on it
    6) Configure everything as you like then install all your drivers
    7) Now after Windows loads, wait for about 2 minutes until you see the Rapid Storage Technology icon in the taskbar, then head to the performance tab and set the options like this:
    [​IMG]
    8) Restart
    9) Wait for 3 minutes till the system is idle, then run a benchmark
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2018
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  8. Lightning_-

    Lightning_- Notebook Geek

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    Awesome, thanks. However currently my OS is on a separate disk, and my original goal was to only RAID the two SATA drives for storage. So OS on M.2 (no raid), and Data on these 2 sata drives in raid. Is there a way to RAID the storage drives on BIOS without reinstalling Windows?
     
  9. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    You'll see Intel RAID Controller in device manager.
     
  10. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    You can't do that. All RAID or none at all!
     
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