PSA: You can now overclock your laptop monitor [intel/intel+optimus]

Discussion in 'Gaming (Software and Graphics Cards)' started by margroloc, Mar 4, 2017.

  1. Pantsu_Samurai

    Pantsu_Samurai Newbie

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    Any guide for Coffee Lake user?
     
  2. Dukatti

    Dukatti Newbie

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    I am using it continuously about 3 monthes. Very much happy with a results.
    Successfully overclocked up to 108hz on ASUS N550JV Haswell, HD4600 + GT750m
    108Hz is a maximum, with an effective color workspace - about very low 1200K, or about very high 9300K [by using f.lux or similar]
    Lower Hz amount allows more color temperature range.

    Pros of using it:
    1) UI, all apps are responding faster allowing over100 tabs in over100 browsers with smooth scrolling [win7]
    2) Faster button response, easier to play in lots of games where reaction, framedata matters.
    3) In games where it's possible to change game speed above 60fps [for instance 108fps in console emulators] gameplay is incredibly smooth

    Notes:
    1) higher then 60fps smoothness appear with a little blur
    [I still very like sharp 100fps on old crt monitors with ability to see extra details]
    2) very demanding games lagging\caching on a new stages\worlds for a first few seconds. Once it's done - stage changes become flawless similar to default 60hz
    3) avoid fullscreen white images on color temperature close to 6500K [default]
    4) high 9300K is very much effective for color-sensitive work

    Artefacts that appearing in close to 6500K on white fullscreen images are:
    1) flickering [painful, looks a lot like ~60hz crt]
    2) hard crt shader effect [hard to read, to watch]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2018
  3. blub123123

    blub123123 Newbie

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    Display: LGD04A7
    Laptop: Lenovo Y700

    Only 62HZ shows up at 1920x1080 with default or automatic timings. (The default timings seem to be the "LCD Reduced" automatic timings.)
    Higher refresh rates show up with lower resolutions, but result in a black screen.

    Any help? Are there any custom timings I could try?
     
  4. Ing_Imperator

    Ing_Imperator Notebook Enthusiast

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    Same as the others, simplay use CRU
     
  5. Ing_Imperator

    Ing_Imperator Notebook Enthusiast

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    New Results :)
    First of, i think it's ONLY dependent on the Display, the cpu an Laptop model is not important, as Long as you can choose the Resolution in Intel Control Panel after creating it with CRU (Thinkpads seem to block this)

    FAIL: Clevo N957TP6 (i5-8600 Desktop CPU, GTX1060...) LG LP156WF9-SPP2. Screen stays black over 65Hz
    Success: Same Laptop: Clevo N957TP6 (i5-8600 Desktop CPU, GTX1060...) Samsung LTN156HL01-C06 90Hz+ without Problems, as Always a faint darker in every odd Pixel line.
     
  6. ssj92

    ssj92 Neutron Star

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    Well, since third gen 9(Ivy bridge) graphics don't support this method and I can't use PEG mode (Optimus only). I went ahead and had my friend help me flash my EDID in Linux. My laptop now has 85hz available everywhere.

    I used CRU to add the resolutions, then exported the EDID and flashed it in Linux using edid-rw. My friend is lazy and won't make a tutorial sorry.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Vasudev likes this.
  7. t456

    t456 1977-09-05, 12:56:00 UTC Moderator

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    Nice, and very good to know that that still works on modern cards. That panel is quite an odd one, btw ...

    For flashing edids you could use my guide or Mr. Fox's from the '8 beep bricking thread'; it's the same tools, except for a different goal.

    Just be careful when using AW Edid Editor when making the custom edid. This program always writes a 256-byte edid, even if the original is 128 bytes. The tools can write both, but you don't want to write 256-bytes to a 128 byte lcd if they've used the next bit for non-edid firmware data.
     
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