Programming skills - born or made?

Discussion in 'Programming and Homework Questions' started by brncao, Oct 10, 2011.

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  1. 3Stars&ASun

    3Stars&ASun Notebook Consultant

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    I just started pursuing a BA in Computer Science... feel the same as you lol. Why are we paying them 50-ish thousand dollars if they only teach the basics and then say your on your own after graduation...
     
  2. Jarhead

    Jarhead Systematic Love

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    Eh, they teach a lot of what you need to know here (BS in CompSci). I did look up a few things on passing pointers in and out of functions (C), but I only had to do it for clarification. So I suppose the learning is based on what school you go to. Reminds me of a joke I heard elsewhere: Great CS degrees come from the Engineering departments, good ones from the Math departments, and bad ones from the Business departments :p.

    $50k for a BA sounds steep though..
     
  3. beanwolf

    beanwolf Notebook Consultant

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    I can definitely agree that a lot of programming classes in college turn you towards the internet to find examples on your own time so professors can move forward more quickly with material in class and cover more of the textbook/syllabus. That's not to say that they aren't good sources of information though. I find that the lectures help me learn faster than hammering through a program myself, although I could definitely do both given enough time. However, I'm only a second semester CS major, a lot of what I know is self taught from my high school days.
     
  4. rofler

    rofler Notebook Guru

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    I got into programming at a relatively early age, but there was no pressure in the comfort of my home. I learned lots of C in those years. One thing that never changed during those years was my ability to type; I used to press one key at a time, since no one had taught me better. Then after I went into my first programming class(C++) I was forced to type faster, else I'd get a poor grade. It is quite odd the way I position my hands though. For example, I type int, double, std::string, std::vector</**/>, char, float, etc. much faster than I do normal words as a result of learning how to type these keywords faster than anything else.

    I believe the logical and math side of programming can be learned&#8212;. Albeit, I'm sure the number of people who enter programming already have somewhat of a background in mathematics.

    Programming as a whole can be learned, just like anything else if the time and effort is put into the subject.
     
  5. 600X

    600X Endless bus ride

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    I'm in a Java course too, and while some seem to be pro's at it, others (like me) are totally lost and basically have no idea whatsoever. In my opinion it's something you are born with, I can't explain how else some people just suddenly can "do" Java while some other (bright) people fail at it.

    I'm sure if you try hard enough, you can learn certain skills, but I think you will still never be as good as someone who's just good at it to begin with.

    Sometimes, there are just things you are good at, and things you are bad at. I'm 100% sure that I'm bad at programming.
     
  6. akashram

    akashram Notebook Enthusiast

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    Logic and syntax is very important to become a good programmer.
     
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