Precision 7750/7550 release date?

Discussion in 'Dell Latitude, Vostro, and Precision' started by Kyle, Feb 11, 2020.

  1. Aaron44126

    Aaron44126 Notebook Prophet

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    It is limited to 80W in the 7540 (even more pointless). In the 7740 it works at 110W. If you want the best graphics performance then you need to buy the 17" system. Maybe in the 7X50 generation, you will be able to cross-flash the vBIOS to increase the power limit in the 15" system. This worked on the 7X30 (Quadro P3200) but it does not appear to work with the 7X40 cards (black screen at boot as @Ionising_Radiation found out).
     
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  2. etern4l

    etern4l Notebook Deity

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    That makes much more sense - thank you. BTW according to IR, the Quadro RTX 5000 card he installed in his 7530 was the max-q variant:
    http://forum.notebookreview.com/threads/official-alienware-area-51m-owners-lounge.826831/page-1942
    so the best he could hope for without exceeding the specs would be 90W.
     
  3. Dell-Mano_G

    Dell-Mano_G Company Representative

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    @Aaron44126 is correct, the 7540 runs the RTX5000 at 80W and the 7740 runs it as 110W.
     
  4. Ionising_Radiation

    Ionising_Radiation ?v = ve*ln(m0/m1)

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    We do hope Dell increases these power limits; as many users here report, there is thermal headroom to accommodate at least 40 W more on both systems, and this nets a significant performance improvement.
     
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  5. Dell-Mano_G

    Dell-Mano_G Company Representative

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    Then those users should come and apply for jobs at Dell and be thermal engineers. haha The graphics cards run at the levels they run because that is the max the systems can accommodate. As it is already, Dell runs the graphic cards at higher wattage than our competition does.
    It is all a give and take. For higher wattage graphics we would need to grow the systems, and the last time I checked no one wanted larger, thicker, heavier systems.
    As it is today, our 7740 is smaller and lighter then the competition and it still runs the NVIDIA Quadro RTX5000 at higher wattage then our competition.
     
  6. etern4l

    etern4l Notebook Deity

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    A fairly condescending response from a company which consistently uses sub-par thermal compounds (I presume that's as true in case of the Precision laptops as it is for high-performance Alienware laptops). Dell laptop users typically report vastly improved thermal performance as a result of repasting their laptops with premium compounds. The low-power Max-Q GPUs in question here tend to end up running in 60-70C range, which suggests there is headroom for TDP increase.
    I'd hope Dell has a good handle on consumer preferences, although the statement above got me worried: it's patently false, given that the majority of users on NBR clearly tends to prioritise performance over thinness and lightness of their laptops - unless perhaps we are nobody for Dell.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2020
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  7. Aaron44126

    Aaron44126 Notebook Prophet

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    I'm going to say that NBR users are not representative of Dell Precision buyers. NBR users are more enthusiasts and Dell ships a lot of these systems en masse to business users that surely do care more about the footprint side of the footprint/performance equation. I personally think that Dell has landed in about the right place on this tradeoff. I would be a lot less interested in a Precision if it had a giant heatsink fan grill thing and required two power supplies connected for max performance like the Alienware Area-51M.

    That said I do agree that this is not a good statement with regards to the GPU power limit. It seems that there is room to increase the GPU power limit (at least a little bit) without growing the system. All of my experience has shown these systems power throttling while the GPU temperature is well under control (perhaps low-mid 80's°C) in many (not all) workloads, which definitely means that the power could be bumped up a bit more. Especially if Dell would invest in better stock thermal compound which I also agree is sub-par, which can knock another few °C off of the GPU temperature. Heck, I'd be fine if there was an option in the BIOS or Dell Precision Optimizer that, with a warning, allowed the user to bump the GPU power limit up 20W or so and was off by default.
     
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  8. Ionising_Radiation

    Ionising_Radiation ?v = ve*ln(m0/m1)

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    AMD has released its Renoir mobile APUs. Long story short, the second-from-top product, the Ryzen 9 4900HS running at 50 W, achieves equal performance to the Intel Core i9-9880H running at 90 W or more.

    One does hope the next release of Precisions will include these incredibly powerful CPUs.
     
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  9. Hopper82

    Hopper82 Notebook Geek

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    I really hope so. I'm so sick of intel's heat-n-patch products.
     
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  10. Aaron44126

    Aaron44126 Notebook Prophet

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    Intel's 10th-gen Comet Lake mobile CPUs will be dropping in just a few days. Honestly not expecting that much of an improvement over 9th gen. It looks like they're raising the maximum turbo boost speed by 0.2 or 0.3 GHz? The architecture is largely the same.

    It'll probably beat out AMD's latest Ryzen chips in terms of performance... barely... at the cost of nearly 2× the power draw.

    I've seen rumors in recent days that we will be seeing Tiger Lake H-series CPUs in 11th gen. It looks like Intel is working on 8-core Tiger Lake mobile CPUs. This would be 10nm chips (finally) on Intel's Willow Cove architecture, which would bring a significant IPC and power efficiency boost and better compete with AMD's latest offerings. This is good news (if true) because it looks like desktops will be getting Rocket Lake, yet another 14nm generation (though possibly also based on Willow Cove).

    Anyway. Anyone know if these AMD mobile CPUs support workstation features (like ECC memory for example, or some analogue to Intel's vPro)? Do they support graphics switching with NVIDIA GPUs? I know that AMD's desktop platform now supports PCI Express 4.0 but the mobile platform does not, which is disappointing, since PCIe 4 NVMe drives are starting to show up. This to say that there could be other discrepancies between what the desktop and mobile setup. I have a hard time believing that Dell would put out AMD Precisions if the platform didn't have feature parity with Intel's platform. That said, AMD has been rapidly iterating and improving in the mobile space — this year's 4900H is so much better than last year's top mobile offering, the 3780U — and if we don't see AMD Precisions this year, we may well see them next year.
     
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