Precision 7550 & 7750 Owners' Thread

Discussion in 'Dell Latitude, Vostro, and Precision' started by SlurpJug, May 30, 2020.

  1. Aaron44126

    Aaron44126 Notebook Prophet

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    If you are talking about the keyboard backlight, there is an option for it in the BIOS.
     
  2. Ionising_Radiation

    Ionising_Radiation ?v = ve*ln(m0/m1)

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  3. Aaron44126

    Aaron44126 Notebook Prophet

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    Just came here to post about this. I noticed an interesting name change. They're just calling the card the "RTX A6000" with the Quadro name nowhere to be seen.

    Still waiting for the tech specs on it but I'm holding fast to my prediction that next year's top mobile pro-GPU card (can't call it "Quadro") will have a GA104 chip (GeForce 3070) and not a GA102 chip like I suspect this A6000 has. NVIDIA's product page doesn't specify the number of CUDA cores, but TechPowerUp has it as a GA102 chip with the full 10,752 cores, more than the GeForce 3090 even has available. This is not a GPU that we will see in a laptop.

    If I had to bet, I would say that next year's top mobile pro-GPU will be GA104 with the full 6,144 CUDA cores and they will call it "RTX A5000". And I think there's a good chance that they'll bump the vRAM up to 32GB.
    [Edit] I've been thinking 24GB is more likely based on what has been showing up in the desktop cards.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2020
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  4. Ionising_Radiation

    Ionising_Radiation ?v = ve*ln(m0/m1)

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    This naming bungle by NVIDIA is going to bite them a little.

    Quadro T5000 and Quadro A5000 would've been simple, but they had to add that 'RTX' there.
     
  5. Aaron44126

    Aaron44126 Notebook Prophet

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    Eh... At least on the laptop side, there isn't anything that you could confuse it with, as your choices for which GPU to put in a system are limited to basically current cards only.

    On the desktop/server side...
    Yesterday, they announced the RTX A6000 and the RTX A40 cards. One would think that the A6000 must be much better than the A40, looking at the name, but really they're basically the same GPU and one is a Quadro and one is a Tesla :-\

    OH! I realized while writing this that they actually didn't include the RTX name with the A40. It is just called "NVIDIA A40". Yes, I guess that totally makes the distinction clear.
     
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  6. Ionising_Radiation

    Ionising_Radiation ?v = ve*ln(m0/m1)

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    I honestly wouldn't put it past NVIDIA to put it in a laptop, but with a 80 W power limit, and the laptop would cost US$20000.

    Fair point. My RTX 5000 should serve me well at least until the warranty expires in 2023, and there are not that many high-profile games releasing after this year.
     
  7. Aaron44126

    Aaron44126 Notebook Prophet

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    I guess I should have said that we won't be seeing this GPU in a Precision. Comments from Dell-Mano_G have made it pretty clear that they're not interested in increasing the thermal profile of these systems or drastically changing the design to handle a different type of GPU cooling solution, like we saw with that Quadro RTX 6000 laptop. Despite changes in their naming convention ("marketing"), NVIDIA has been very consistent about which chip they choose from each generation as the highest that we see in a laptop, on both the Quadro and GeForce side, going all of the way back to Kepler. (GK104, GM204, GP104, TU104...)

    I could be wrong (patterns only hold until they are broken). For instance, I was taken by surprise when we saw the Quadro RTX 4000 and RTX 5000 show up in the Precision 7540 — I think that the only reason that we are seeing 4000 and 5000-level cards in the 15" Precision now is because Dell felt that they had to respond to other manufacturers who were putting them in similar systems. But... I still don't think that they'll be pushing anything higher than the GA104 chip for (Dell) laptop GPUs in 2021.

    Still gaming on a Quadro M5000M in my 8-year-old Precision M6700 over here... :p
    Haven't had any real issues getting any game that I have tried running at 60 FPS solid (not a high settings with newer games, though). I think that the rate at which graphics are getting "better" is slowing down (good for the wallet), and the benefit to each passing generation is getting less and less important (i.e. ray tracing sure is pretty but it doesn't impact actual gameplay very much). I plan to upgrade my home system in 2022 and I think that sitting on it for another 10 years will probably be just fine.
     
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  8. alex52910

    alex52910 Newbie

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    Hey, guys
    I am planning to buy Precision 7750, which looks great.
    Though I am concerned about its display:
    17.3-inch Full High Definition (FHD) - 1920 x 1080 - 500 nits - 100% DCIP3
    https://www.dell.com/support/manual...79fc11-9b22-44fa-ba0d-ae67ba34e9f8&lang=en-us

    Seems like it has PWM based on the tests in this video:

    Which looks very scary as 1/330 - seem like 330Hz, which is pretty low number.

    Could someone put the exact specification of the LCD panel used in this exact version of display ?
    It could be find out by Aida64 tool in Display section - manufacturer, model, version.
    Based on that it could be further investigated whether it has or not flickering effect (PWM).

    Thanks in advance.
     
  9. Homer S

    Homer S Notebook Evangelist

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    "In my day" there was a function key that disabled the dGPU. Is there the same idea in the 7550? When I'm unplugged and just presenting PowerPoint slides, I would like to turn off the dGPU to get a little more battery life. I know I could reboot and disable in BIOS but that seems barbaric.

    Homer
     
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  10. Aaron44126

    Aaron44126 Notebook Prophet

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    AFAIK this has never been an option in Dell workstations. This really was available on a small number of notebooks before automatic graphics switching (Optimus/Enduro) was a thing. The dGPU "should" be disabled automatically whenever you are not running an app that needs it. You can see the current status by going to the NVIDIA control panel. Select "Desktop -> Display GPU Activity Icon..." from the menu at the top. An icon will appear in the system tray / notification area. Gray = dGPU off, colored = dGPU on, click on it to see which apps are using it.
     
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