Precision 7530 & Precision 7730 owner's thread

Discussion in 'Dell Latitude, Vostro, and Precision' started by Aaron44126, Jun 27, 2018.

  1. Soromeister

    Soromeister Notebook Enthusiast

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    I see what you mean. I have 4 of those NVMe drives and I am using all of those slots, but that one is not showing in the picture. This picture was taken when I wanted to take them all out and just place the original NVMe drive in order to send the laptop to the Dell lab. They don't really need my Storage units, just the laptop itself.

    Apologies for the confusion created.

    Makes perfect sense, because your PCH temperature won't jump to the skies, provided you use a very good thermal paste, there should be no thermal throttling, unless you use the NVMe drive that is closest to the PCH diode on your motherboard. For example, if you frequently use that Storage unit, it will get hot, propagating the heat towards the PCH and the PCH, having no means of cooling down will cause your machine to throttle thermally.

    The PCH diode is a small chip on your motherboard that has a clear surface, just like the CPU or GPU has after you clean the thermal paste off of them. The PCH diode is probably not connected to the heatsink so it should be the only chip with clear surface that's not connected to the heatsink. It might have a thermal pad on top of it though. Search for it and then determine if there's any of the NVMe drives that's close to it, or beneath it. If so, you should use that drive sparingly, else PCH will heat up.

    For the power limit I can only think of Intel XTU. You might want to try that one. For the dGPU though, I'm not sure you can change it as it's hardcoded or locked somehow. I also tried to raise it on the dGPU using MSI Afterburner but it didn't work (I have P5200).
     
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  2. slimpower

    slimpower Notebook Evangelist

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    Thanks, and that's a good point, but technology seems to be moving so fast these days that I doubt the PCIe Gen 4 will be the latest by the time I get a new Precision. This is however great news for people looking to buy PCIe Gen 3 SSDs as their prices are only going to drop further. Happy about that last bit. Cheers.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2019
  3. Ionising_Radiation

    Ionising_Radiation ?v = ve*ln(m0/m1)

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    On the 7530, the PCH faces the other way (so no risk of NVMe slots locking in the heat of the PCH). This appears to be an unfortunate design side effect of the 7730 and 7740.

    On my particular 7530 unit (a replacement), there actually exists a block of thermal foam to conduct heat from the PCH to the metal beneath the keyboard.

    Why not just keep link state power management at maximum power savings? It does you no favours to leave it at maximum performance, as it powers down unused PCIe lanes, and, as you've seen, keeps the PCH cool.

    As an aside, desktop motherboards have large heatsinks for the PCH alone; I don't understand why notebook manufacturers don't prioritise cooling the PCH as well, too.
     
  4. Yves_

    Yves_ Newbie

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    Sooo further testing showed me that PCH in maximum power saving mode does not have any effect on the CPU performance NOR the nvme raid performance. I might do some funny testings soon. NVidia Titan RTX on the 7530 :) if you want me to :)
     
  5. Ionising_Radiation

    Ionising_Radiation ?v = ve*ln(m0/m1)

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    So, in a bid for improved battery life, I updated to Windows 10 1909. I was initially very pleased that the battery power draw was less than 10 W, the phenomenon when the GPU is forced to sleep. I was slightly suspicious, and checked the NVIDIA activity indicator: turns out Paint 3D was somehow running in the background. I closed it from Task Manager, and power draw shot back up.

    I feel shortchanged. The Dell rep I spoke to dismissed the case as 'expected battery life for a machine 1 year old'. Do they seriously expect only five to six hours of battery life when running the integrated graphics chip only and a 97 watt-hour battery?

    That being said, Paint 3D somehow runs in the background all the time, even after manually being closed. I am intrigued. This saves me the hassle of opening an instance of an Adobe app (it has the same effect of locking and idling the GPU, thus saving power), but why does Paint 3D have to run in the background in the first place?
     
  6. Martin Ro

    Martin Ro Notebook Enthusiast

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    Simple: To Fix the issue with Nvidia not going to sleep properly^^

    Microsoft's solution of that issue ;)
     
  7. Soromeister

    Soromeister Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hello,

    Coming back with an update on this. I managed to get a technician to come and he replaced the system board and GPU, but I had an error coming up in the ePSA Diagnostics, however, the GPU was visible in the system. When I got back home, to my surprise, GPU got invisible again and also the error in the ePSA disappeared. I suspect that there is something to do with the DGFF cable or the Beam connectors that connect the GPU to the System Board. The technician left with quite a lot of the screws of my laptop, which is super unprofessional and also he misplaced the screws and got me a bulge on the palm rest of the laptop.

    Called Dell Support again and now I've sent it back to the lab to get it fixed. I'm giving them 30 days and already prepared communication for the Consumer Protection Agency here. I am without words and so far I have never in my life experienced worse support than I've got from Dell, given I've got the full support package.

    I have also asked some people from Dell to escalate my situation internally to upper management so I hope there will be actions taken based on that.

    Just wanted to give an update here, but I'm pretty sure I will never in my life buy a Dell product ever again and this is only because of the lacking of proper Support.
     
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  8. Manjeet Singh

    Manjeet Singh Newbie

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    Hello,

    I'm having a Dell Precision 7730 with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. So wanted to know,is it possible to upgrade current wifi card [Intel Dual Band Wireless AC 9260 802.11ac MU-MIMO 2x2] to wifi 6 based card. In case yes which card should i buy ? Please suggest. Thanks.
     
  9. Ionising_Radiation

    Ionising_Radiation ?v = ve*ln(m0/m1)

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    This should be possible: consider purchasing the Intel AX200. However, you will only see improved speeds if your router supports this speed, and your ISP can provide this speed upstream. Even a top-notch 1 Gbps connection will bottleneck a Wi-Fi 802.11ax connection.
     
  10. Aaron44126

    Aaron44126 Notebook Prophet

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    Intel AX201 card is out now. You can find the cards on eBay for less than $20, they are a drop-in replacement. I have an AX200 working in my seven-year-old M6700.

    You will still get improved speeds for local transfer (file sharing / local backup) even if your ISP doesn't support near-gigabit speeds for Internet. (That was my primary draw for upgrading.) You will however of course need a router that supports 802.11ax / Wi-Fi 6.
     
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