Precision 7530 & Precision 7730 owner's thread

Discussion in 'Dell Latitude, Vostro, and Precision' started by Aaron44126, Jun 27, 2018.

  1. Martin Ro

    Martin Ro Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    6
    This behaviour, or at least the basic issue, seems more like an hardware (construction) issue than an software issue (why should software react on tapping a cable ??).
    Most likely there is a bad contact construction/design on the usb-c connection side that results in very small signal distortions or maybe a grounding issue.

    And most likely the linux software is simply a bit more fail tolerant in that department than windows.

    But nevertheless the basic issue is a hardware issue and I fear it's some conceptional thing of the dock and/or the precision itself (I have a strong suspicion regarding grounding or something like that). This will, most likely, not be fixable by software :-(
     
    baspacc likes this.
  2. Regular_Ragnor

    Regular_Ragnor Notebook Geek

    Reputations:
    15
    Messages:
    97
    Likes Received:
    52
    Trophy Points:
    26
    I have two TB18-DC's; one I use at my client site and one I (was intending to) use at my home office. The one I have at home has the same issue with the connection failing at the slightest touch of the cable. The one I have at my client is rock-solid and doesn't budge.
     
    baspacc likes this.
  3. baspacc

    baspacc Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    6
    I was wondering if OS could have something to do with that (better stability under Linux). In many cases the dock itself doesn't get disconnected (no device disconnect sound in windows), so maybe it just a slight data stream interruption. But I do agree the source is in HW.

    That's actually a very good tip - I'll see if I can check it with another TB18DC. If it's in fact a dock issue, I'll see if I can have it replaced.
     
  4. tem2

    tem2 Newbie

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    5
    Thanks for the clarification. Apart from copying large files once in a while, I don't really need 40Gbps right now, but I plan on using this computer for the next 8-10 years and I wanted to make sure I can upgrade it as much as possible, e.g. with an external GPU. But since it seems to be a common design limitation, I'm not going to search for a different laptop.

    Question, though: would it only be bottlenecked when loading data to/from the CPU, and could it get up to 40Gbps when e.g. copying a large file from an external TB3 drive directly to an internal drive on the chipset?
     
  5. frostbytes

    frostbytes Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    2
    Messages:
    227
    Likes Received:
    17
    Trophy Points:
    31
    That's disappointing. It does sound like these (expensive) machines have quality control issues. In addition to the dock connection being super sensitive, I'm finding that one of my USB ports is not reliable. I thought that might be the case from when I first received my 7730 but ignored it and now that I need that port, it's flaky.
     
  6. Aaron44126

    Aaron44126 Notebook Prophet

    Reputations:
    740
    Messages:
    4,181
    Likes Received:
    1,185
    Trophy Points:
    231
    All of those bytes would still have to go through the CPU on the way through, I believe.
     
  7. jeremyshaw

    jeremyshaw Big time Idiot

    Reputations:
    757
    Messages:
    3,183
    Likes Received:
    212
    Trophy Points:
    131
    While I do not know about this use case, I would surely hope not! It would kill the entire reason of having a point to point interface like PCIe!
    Though, a lot of file system work is done on the CPU, despite the presence of multiple ARM cores on SSD controllers (probably because most home storage is done in blocks, not "files"). I could definitely see a CPU having to do a lot of unnecessary heavy lifting just to do a data transfer.
     
  8. Ionising_Radiation

    Ionising_Radiation ?v = ve*ln(m0/m1)

    Reputations:
    671
    Messages:
    2,786
    Likes Received:
    2,323
    Trophy Points:
    181
    So, @Aaron44126, @jeremyshaw and @tem2...

    I attempted a disk-to-disk copy (of a *ahem* certain file)—this was from a 1 TB WD Black NVMe to a completely empty 500 GB WD Black NVMe, so there should be little if no bottlenecks:
    [​IMG]
    It's clear that over an extended period of time, the disk transfer rate never even hit a single PCIe 3.0 lane's bandwidth of 985 MB/s, let alone the full 3400 MB/s promised by either drive.

    At any rate, the 40 Gbps promised by TB3 includes the bandwidth of a DisplayPort signal, which is output by the GPU and not the CPU. If you're outputting 4K 8bpc RGB at 60 Hz, that requires a bandwidth of 3840 × 2160 × 24 × 60 = 11.94 Gbps = 1.492 GB/s. If you want 4K HDR 10bpc at a blistering 144 Hz, that's an enormous 35.83 Gbps, just for a video-out signal.

    File transfers are the least of our worries, really, because 90% of personal computing workloads are 'bursty' in nature. Quick ramp up, quick ramp down. Furthermore, most internet connections haven't even hit 1 Gbps yet. 10 Gbps is only just reaching mass availability, as are the associated NICs. So I think these will certainly last a while.
     
    tem2 likes this.
  9. Aaron44126

    Aaron44126 Notebook Prophet

    Reputations:
    740
    Messages:
    4,181
    Likes Received:
    1,185
    Trophy Points:
    231
    Yes, I basically see the flow as the OS reading blocks from one drive into memory and then flushing them out to the other drive, so the CPU is involved in the whole process. I don't know of another way that you can tell one drive "hey please send these blocks straight to another drive". Because of this I think that best case is you could get two lanes of bandwidth in disk-to-disk transfer (if four lanes is the max total, it will need two lanes for reading and two lanes for writing).

    That said, I think that a copy speed of nearly 1 GB per second is pretty good, you'd have to be doing some serious data work in order for that to feel "slow". (I can see, maybe dealing with huge databases, VM images, or backup files.)
     
    Ionising_Radiation likes this.
  10. yaroslavnguyen

    yaroslavnguyen Newbie

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Hey guys, need ur opinion about new laptop
    I work usually on Adobe After Effect, considering about Acer Predator Helios 500 (i7 8750h, 32gb ram, 1070, 144hz 1080p) with Precision 7730 (i7 8850h, 32gb ram, P3200, 1080p), any advise ?
    Many thanks
     
Loading...

Share This Page