Precision 7530 & Precision 7730 owner's thread

Discussion in 'Dell Latitude, Vostro, and Precision' started by Aaron44126, Jun 27, 2018.

  1. Aaron44126

    Aaron44126 Notebook Prophet

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    Hmm, is there any difference in transcoding performance with the different vBIOS? This is a case where I think there might not be. NVENC doesn't use the CUDA cores, my understanding is that it uses separate hardware that is actually identical across all Pascal chips. (NVENC performance should be the same between the P1000, P5200, GeForce 1060, and Titan X. Or at least the difference would not be very drastic between the low and high end if it is impacted by the core clock speed... but I think it might be even separate from that.)
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2019
  2. rkh

    rkh Notebook Enthusiast

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    So I'm certainly not the only one that has installed additional M.2's in the slots beneath the 7730 base cover. One of the slots is mechanically correct. The other two seem backwards. The implication in the manual is that you attach the heatsink and slide into place. But with two of the slots, you can't do that. The "slide" would be in the direction for removal, not insertion. In the photo below, note the red arrow. The only way to get that tab from the heatsink into that position would be to insert it through the slot and slide LEFT, not RIGHT. The M.2 slot above does not have that problem. The guides are such that you slide the entire assembly to the left to remove the M.2 - doing so aligns that tab with the notch in the case such that you can remove it.

    I must be missing the obvious - please point it out to me :)

    m2.png
     
  3. Aaron44126

    Aaron44126 Notebook Prophet

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    The heatsinks are oriented backwards between the two slots that are right next to each other, so you're right, one should slide left to install and the other should slide right. I wouldn't put it past Dell to goof up on the direction of the arrow, the manuals often contain small errors.

    Anyway, the heatsinks were already present when you got the system, right? Just install them back how they came (take care to remove the plastic film covering the thermal pad if you didn't have a drive installed there to begin with).
     
  4. rkh

    rkh Notebook Enthusiast

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    That's the problem, the M.2's must slide right to fit into the edge connector. But you can't do that with the one closest to the battery (bottom one) because the slots between the case and heatsink are not such that you can push down and slide right. For that heatsink to fix the case mount points it has to go down and to the left - which with an M.2 adhered to it would simply unplug it from its socket.

    Yes, all three slots have mounted heatsinks and screws. Grateful for that.

    So maybe that's just the design for when no M.2's are inserted. Otherwise just stick on the heatsink and screw it down. Maybe the person that wrote the document was just illustrating reinserting the heatsink with the down and slide into the mount slots action. But they didn't realize that was not possible if an M.2 was attached to it - at least in two of the 3 slots.
     
  5. Aaron44126

    Aaron44126 Notebook Prophet

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    I don't have a 7730 but I can tell you that I've read multiple reports of people installing three and four drives in this thread, and no one has complained about it being impossible because of the heatsink design...
    You shouldn't be able to "unplug" the M.2 drive from its socket by pushing the heatsink in either direction. It only moves in and out from the socket freely when it is angled up. And in any case, you can just attach the mounting screw to the end of the M.2 drive before attempting to mount the heatsink, and the M.2 drive will be immovable.

    Are you trying to install the drive and heatsink simultaneously, i.e. with the heatsink "stuck" to the drive when you are plugging it in? Don't do that; install the drive without the heatsink first and then install the heatsink afterwards.
     
  6. rkh

    rkh Notebook Enthusiast

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    I'm probably just being too overcautious. But yes, since there are notches in the frame that are designed for the heatsink to be placed then slid left/right, I thought I was supposed to do that with the M.2 attached. But that's just physically impossible. I could and might just cut off the tip that the arrow points to in my post above. You can see in that photo, the tip was inserted into a notch just to the right of the arrow then the heatsink was moved left - thereby securing that "tip" beneath the frame and presumably holding it firmly down. With that tip on the top of the frame, I'm not sure how much contact the heatsink has with the M.2.

    If the socket was on the opposite side, you could assemble the heatsink/M.2, lower them into position, then push into the edge connector with the heatsink "fin" secured beneath the case molding. There's even a guide in the frame for the part where the screw attaches - you can see that in the photo above too.
     
  7. Regular_Ragnor

    Regular_Ragnor Notebook Geek

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    That's not the case. The M.2 connector needs the drive to be 'slid in' at a 30 degree angle from the motherboard, and then pushed down to the board. It will bounce back up until you screw the drive down. There is no room for any lateral movement once the drive is pushed down and that's how it should be.

    Mount the drive, then mount the heatsink. The drive won't budge once the screw is in.

    I do agree that it feels awkward to slide the thermal pad across the drive. I would have preferred a second screw.
     
  8. SirTypesALot

    SirTypesALot Notebook Enthusiast

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    Is it possible to boot from an SD card? I am trying to boot an Ubuntu Live SD card but not having any success. Things I have tried include enabling in the BIOS "Secure Digital (SD) card boot", disable secure boot, enable Legacy external devices, enable legacy option ROMs. None of these allow the SD card to show up as a boot option in the boot menu.

    One odd thing was that I had forgotten the Ubuntu SD card was in SD card slot, and was booting off a Mint Live USB, and after it started to boot (showed the Linux Mint loading screen), it then booted into Ubuntu from the SD card... weird.
     
  9. Ionising_Radiation

    Ionising_Radiation ?v = ve*ln(m0/m1)

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    I doubt this is what you're looking for, but an SD to USB adaptor should work. Which wastes both an SD card and a USB port. I've tried booting off SD cards too, to no avail. Perhaps raise it to Dell support?
     
  10. rkh

    rkh Notebook Enthusiast

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    Yeah, you're right about the 30 degree angle. Also, I've not considered/tried sliding the thermal pad across the drive after attaching it. I just assumed it would not be flexible enough to budge sufficiently to line up the screw hole. Also I thought it might pull the drive out of the socket - given that I'm nudging in the opposite direction. But maybe that's mechanically impossible - with the small amount of force that would be used.

    I'll try that - sounds like I made this more complicated than it needed to be :) I suppose we're not talking super glue here. Maybe the slight budge needed just helps spread/seal the adhesive across the surface - as opposed to just applying brute downward force to get a good stick/seal.
     
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