Precision 7530 & Precision 7730 owner's thread

Discussion in 'Dell Latitude, Vostro, and Precision' started by Aaron44126, Jun 27, 2018.

  1. Aaron44126

    Aaron44126 Notebook Prophet

    Reputations:
    727
    Messages:
    4,059
    Likes Received:
    1,131
    Trophy Points:
    231
    Win10 Enterprise and Education are basically identical except for where you get them from.

    To load drivers, the Windows 10 installer will want extracted files, a folder full of stuff including an .inf file. The Intel Rapid Storage "F6" driver should extract to just this. Here's a link to the actual Intel version.

    https://downloadcenter.intel.com/do...l-RST-User-Interface-and-Driver?product=55005
    Get f6flpy-x64.zip, extract it to a flash drive or something, and point the Windows 10 installer there.

    It is fine to run the system with RAID mode turned on even if you do not create any arrays (I think this is the factory configuration).
     
  2. radio2034

    radio2034 Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Regarding Debian Stretch on the 7530, I have it working mostly. The only thing not working yet is WiFi, I'm expecting to fix this soon, and will update when I figure it out.

    Here is how I installed Debian on my Dell Precision 7530:

    1. Put the Debian DVD #1 iso onto a flash drive. Find it here: https://cdimage.debian.org/debian-cd/current/amd64/iso-dvd/
    2. Install Debian as normal, ignore issues with not being able to fetch network resources. Use additional DVD ISOs if necessary to get packages.
    3. Debian Stretch comes with Linux 4.9.0.7 at the time of writing. This is too old. Using another computer, grab 4.17 from Stretch Backports (here: https://packages.debian.org/stretch-backports/linux-image-4.17.0-0.bpo.3-amd64)
    4. With the system booted, install the newer kernel with "sudo dpkg -i <filename.deb>".
    5. Reboot. Make sure you boot into the 4.17 kernel with Grub.
    6. Touchpad and Ethernet work at this point. Plug your laptop into Ethernet to continue.
    7. Add the stretch-backports repo to your sources.list. Instructions here: https://backports.debian.org/Instructions/. Also, since you used DVD only during the install, sources.list has stretch-updates commented out. Uncomment those lines so you can get updates in the future.
    8. Update the kernel to the latest using apt. For me, that was "apt-get install linux-image-4.18.0-0.bpo.1-amd64"
    9. Reboot. Make sure you boot into 4.18 with Grub.
    10. Remove 4.17 -- 'apt-get remove linux-image-4.17.0-0.bpo.3-amd64'

    11. Done!
    I'll update the thread once I get WiFi working. Right now, I'm getting errors in dmesg about minimum/maximum versions, so I think I'll need to download the latest iwlwifi from git and compile it locally. Will test that soon...
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2018
    ksm123 likes this.
  3. radio2034

    radio2034 Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    6
    This did not work for me unfortunately. It offered to install the "Intel(R) 300 Series Chipset Family SATA AHCI Controller (D:\iaAHCIC.inf)", and after hitting Next, it said "No new device drivers were found. Make sure the installation media contains the correct drivers, and then click OK.".
    Hmm...

    Edit: I switched to RAID mode in the BIOS, and had the same error (different driver names though). Perhaps I should call or email Dell and ask what drivers are necessary, or if they could send me the recovery image for Win10.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2018
  4. Ionising_Radiation

    Ionising_Radiation ?v = ve*ln(m0/m1)

    Reputations:
    641
    Messages:
    2,727
    Likes Received:
    2,272
    Trophy Points:
    181
    What's with the combative rhetoric?

    I was quite clear on my stance: I don't want a UHD panel on my notebook because I don't like the scaling issues.

    Yes, it does bother me that MMC windows, control panels (sometimes not even that that obscure), and several other legacy applications I use have poor scaling. In fact, even the PDF viewer in Google Chrome scales poorly (and about a month and a half ago, the latest update of Chrome, too, had messed up scaling). It reflects poorly on Windows and Microsoft, if elements of its own OS are still stuck in the late '90s, and does not play well with settings within its own OS.

    There was no real need to go 'who gives a damn'... Because I do. Incidentally, I use MathType and even that had scaling issues.

    Furthermore, rendering four times the pixels per second, has a highly deleterious effect on battery life. The battery life is already poor, at six hours for a 97-Whr battery, when ten or so is likely expected, under normal use.

    We have gone completely off tangent: my point was about Dell making a poor choice on the 1080p panel.

    Also, @Aaron44126, OS X has scaling options within System Preferences that allow the user to choose what the display 'looks like' — because OS X uses vector rendering for most of its UI. So for example, the UI elements of OS X will look exactly the same size regardless of whether you're viewing it on the 2011 15" MacBook Pro (which had a 1440 × 900 display, or optionally a 1680 × 1050 display), or the 2880 × 1800 Retina Display.

    This is because the exact ×2 scaling was ported over neatly from iOS—have the UI elements prerendered or drawn, scaled by a factor of 2 on each axis; have 2 times the pixels on each axis, and the final result stays the same size, but is twice as sharp on each axis.

    Windows notebooks have had to work with HiDPI displays since 2013 (my old Clevo had a 13.3" 1080p display, and boy, was that a pain), and its scaling mechanism is still not entirely fixed.

    Apple has had a detailed, simple API for UI scaling on both its OSes which Microsoft has not.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2018
  5. Aaron44126

    Aaron44126 Notebook Prophet

    Reputations:
    727
    Messages:
    4,059
    Likes Received:
    1,131
    Trophy Points:
    231
    That sounds like you tried to install it in AHCI mode. Did you try RAID mode? It should show a different device name (Intel SATA RAID Controller or something). In AHCI mode, the NVMe drives are not attached to the AHCI controller, so you wouldn't see any new drives after installing that driver.

    If you did try it in RAID mode, well, I have no idea what's going on.
     
  6. radio2034

    radio2034 Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Sorry, just edited my post above. Yes, I tried at first in AHCI, and I just retried in RAID mode. Had the same error (different driver names though). Do you have any more ideas?
    Pic: https://imgur.com/a/4qfAc5l
    Edit: Retried after restoring BIOS to default settings, same result.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2018
  7. radio2034

    radio2034 Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    6
    I'm now running Debian Stretch 9.5 on my 7530 with no issues so far. I haven't done anything with the AMD GPU besides basic desktop stuff -- I'll reserve testing of that for another day. Here are my revised steps for installing Debian Stretch on the Dell Precision 7530. I had my system configured with the AMD Radeon 4150 and the Intel 9260 AC WiFi. If you got one of the NVIDIA GPUs, I would recommend installing the binary driver from NVIDIA's website if the open source nouveau driver isn't enough for you.

    1. Put the Debian DVD #1 ISO onto a flash drive. Find it here: https://cdimage.debian.org/debian-cd/current/amd64/iso-dvd/
    2. Install Debian as normal, ignore issues with not being able to fetch network resources. Use additional DVD ISOs if necessary to get packages.
    3. Debian Stretch comes with Linux 4.9.0.7 at the time of writing. This is too old. Using another computer, grab 4.17 from Stretch Backports (here: https://packages.debian.org/stretch-backports/linux-image-4.17.0-0.bpo.3-amd64)
    4. With the system booted, install the newer kernel with "sudo dpkg -i <filename.deb>".
    5. Reboot. Make sure you boot into the 4.17 kernel with Grub.
    6. Touchpad and Ethernet should be working at this point. Plug your laptop into Ethernet to continue.
    7. Add the stretch-backports repo to your sources.list. Instructions here: https://backports.debian.org/Instructions/. Also, since you used DVD only during the install, /etc/apt/sources.list has stretch-updates commented out, and you don't have the main repos. Uncoment the stretch-update lines, and add these lines:
      deb http://ftp.us.debian.org/debian/ stretch main contrib non-free
      deb-src http://ftp.us.debian.org/debian/ stretch main contrib non-free
    8. Run apt-get update.
    9. Update the kernel to the latest using apt. For me, that was "apt-get install linux-image-4.18.0-0.bpo.1-amd64"
    10. Reboot. Make sure you boot into 4.18 with Grub. At this point, run "apt-get dist-upgrade" since you have updated the kernel.
    11. Install linux-firmware to get AMDGPU drivers. apt-get install linux-firmware. You might also need linux-firmware-nonfree.
    12. Download the Intel 9260AC wireless drivers (iwlwifi). The iwlwifi drivers included in the Debian repos are too old. Grab them from here:
      https://www.intel.com/content/www/u...5511/network-and-i-o/wireless-networking.html
      (You need "Intel® Wireless-AC 9260")
    13. Follow the instructions in the driver download. All you have to do is run "cp iwlwifi-9260-th-b0-jf-b0-34.ucode /lib/firmware"
    14. Reboot. You should now have working GPU, WiFi, Touchpad, and Ethernet. Enjoy!

    I plan to write this up on the Debian wiki as well eventually. If anyone uses these steps and it works for them, let me know!

    Edited to add a couple things.
    First, I wanted to note that when I was on Dell's Ubuntu install, I was having the occasional flickering issue on the display. That issue has disappeared since installing Ubuntu. I guess it was a driver issue.
    Secondly, I wanted to add that if you have a USB to Ethernet adapter that is recognized by Debian Stretch 4.9.0.7 natively, you can avoid adding 4.17. Just install the system with the normal netinst image, and then once you're in, add the backports repo to sources.list and upgrade your kernel to 4.18. I didn't have one, so this was my workaround.
    Third, I started the Debian Wiki entry for the 7530. The formatting needs help, and there needs to be a lot more testing (hibernation, OpenGL, xrandr, CPU frequency scaling, hotkeys, and more). However, this system seems like a great Debian system once you get a newer kernel installed! If you want to pitch in after setting up Debian, that would be great! https://wiki.debian.org/InstallingDebianOn/Dell/Precision 7530
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2018
    ksm123 and Ionising_Radiation like this.
  8. kittenlips

    kittenlips Notebook Geek

    Reputations:
    2
    Messages:
    86
    Likes Received:
    19
    Trophy Points:
    16
    @Ionising_Radiation that's always been exactly my point, you're upset because selected a 1080p panel and Dell put in a crappy 6-bit model, and now you are likely going to spend all this money and imagine all the wasted time you've already and will put into this to buy and install a new custom panel. Imagine how awful the 6-bit panel must be that you are willing to go through this.

    I'm just having a discussion and stating my opinion if its worth it over selecting a better UHD panel and having a few scaling issues in some legacy areas of Windows and certain apps. I'm stating my opinion and that is I've been burnt in the past like you have now, I know companies will always skimp on costs particularly in their lower offerings, always know this and think twice before selecting certain configurations.

    This is not a true statement anymore. When you are using hybrid graphics and drive the UHD display with the Intel iGPU it is way more energy efficient. On all three of my laptops that have UHD panels there is a clear and major difference in battery life, period. I think the difference in battery life would only be on the scale of 30 mins between a UHD and 1080p panel in this scenario.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2018
  9. ole!!!

    ole!!! Notebook Prophet

    Reputations:
    2,271
    Messages:
    5,746
    Likes Received:
    3,667
    Trophy Points:
    431
    yo man you still around? i still have your alienware 18x with custom bazel hahahah
     
  10. ksm123

    ksm123 Newbie

    Reputations:
    5
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    6
    A dumb question, but better safe than sorry.

    Using weaker power supply with 7530. In a pinch is it possible to use 90W (19.5V, 4.62A) power supply?

    Two use cases:
    1. Recharging a sleeping laptop.
    2. Working on it (coding, so tens of seconds of low CPU usage followed by short high CPU load bursts, no dGPU).
    Would it be dangerous for laptop, power brick; or would there be just some throttling due to insufficient power.
     
Loading...

Share This Page