Powerful and compact business laptop

Discussion in 'What Notebook Should I Buy?' started by DuffMcShank, Jul 11, 2016.

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  1. John Ratsey

    John Ratsey Moderately inquisitive Super Moderator

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    The E7440 uses a different keyboard design than the newer models. The older keyboard isn't a separated key style and is just a single unit which is very easy to swap. The newer keyboard design has separated keys with what Dell calls a "shroud" covering the gaps between the keys. There are extra fixing screws under the shroud which makes the keyboard more rigid and less bouncy. This fixing arrangement is illustrated in the User Manual.

    John
     
  2. Krowe

    Krowe Notebook Evangelist

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    Yup, you can't compare between the different iterations, as they are built differently. The E7470 has a two piece construction while the 7440 has a 3 piece construction.
    That said, I don't recall any of the travelling guys complain about the keyboard on a latitude before.

    P.S. It should also be noted that keys on non chiclet (aka the old style, which the 7440 has) will always be more "wobbly" than their chiclet counterparts.
     
  3. penguinslider

    penguinslider Notebook Consultant

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    Inserting RAM is really easy. Pop the lid and slide those bad boys in. Lots of tutorials on the web :)
     
  4. DuffMcShank

    DuffMcShank Notebook Guru

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    I decided to go for processing power and speed over size, and ended up with an XPS 15 9550, with 16GB RAM, i7-6700 HQ, 512GB PCIe SSD and a FHD matte screen. Although I would prefer an Inspiron 5510 with the same specs, that would be 30% more expensive.

    Ideally I would wait to see what the Kaby Lake generation of laptops has to offer, especially the Surface Book 2, but I couldn't wait this time around.
     
  5. Krowe

    Krowe Notebook Evangelist

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    Funny, you wanted a business laptop but ended up buying a high end consumer one. It's a pretty decent choice, but the durability isn't the same.
     
  6. ananas

    ananas Notebook Guru

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    If budget is not an issue, then Vaio Z Flip is a very compact business laptop. Microsoft Surface Book is a good option too. But neither one has a USB-C. XPS 13 has one tho afaik.
     
  7. Krowe

    Krowe Notebook Evangelist

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    and neither are actually business notebooks...
     
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  8. tijo

    tijo Sacred Blame Super Moderator

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    The 6300 HQ will leave the 65000U in the dust, the former is an actual quad cores (4 cores, 4 threads) full voltage CPU, the other is a dual core (2 cores, 4 threads) CPU. The difference is pretty substantial for anything mildly intensive and is worth it in my opinion. The next step would be an i7-6700 HQ or if available the 4 core 8 thread Xeons, the improvements in performance aren't as high as from the dual core i5 to the quad core one, but the clock speeds are higher and the hyperthreading can net you some nice gains. You could easily load 4 threads with your intensive tasks and thanks to hyperthreading, the computer will still be responsive for light tasks such as writing documents and web browsing while the rest of the CPU is happily crunching numbers away.

    Well, the XPS 15 is an odd beast, it shares the exact same chassis as the Precision 5510, so it remains a pretty solid notebook. Not as tough as a 7510 or 7710, but by no means flimsy either. The differences with the 5510 are basically the mainboard and a few minor things, the outside shell is the same. I'm betting Dell wanted to save money on the chassis development costs by having them share the same, which in the end is a plus for the XPS15 since they couldn't cut that many corners on a chassis meant for their Precision line also.
     
  9. Krowe

    Krowe Notebook Evangelist

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    Honestly, I think its the other way around. The consensus at the office is that the chassis was meant and built as an apple competitor, it just happened to be good enough for most usage scenarios that they've started using the XPS13 and 15 chassis for Latitude and Precisions. There are telltale signs of this, for example the lack of a numpad. Of course the internal will be slightly different with different component choices, but something adapted to be used as a business product will not hold up as well as something purposely built as a business product.
     
  10. DuffMcShank

    DuffMcShank Notebook Guru

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    I wouldn't say my current XPS chassis strikes me as flimsy... I might be a little bit more skeptical about the capacitors sound- and durability-wise, buy we'll see. Anyways it comes with on-site support if something should happen.
     
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