Post Your Ride(s)

Discussion in 'Motorized Vehicles' started by Thaenatos, Apr 21, 2011.

  1. KPot2004

    KPot2004 Notebook Evangelist

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    I've only ever owned 3 vehicles that I've bought new. A 2011 Honda Civic, a 2013 Honda Fit, and a 2015 Chevrolet Silverado. The 2011 Civic I still have and in the 66,000 miles I've had it has needed nothing besides oil changes and tire rotations. The 2013 Fit had 24,000 miles when I traded it in on the Silverado and again never needed anything besides oil changes and tire rotations. The 2015 Silverado didn't even make it a week before the tochscreen randomly shut off..and stayed off.. 8 hours at the dealership before they diagnosed the problem as a loose connector. Not that big of a deal since it was fixed under warranty but.. Still not sold on American vehicles. I genuinely like the Silverado, but would have probably stuck with Honda if they produced a truck. Japanese vehicles IMO just work, they might not be the most powerful, best looking, or even have the best MPG, but you'll almost NEVER have any problems.
     
  2. ZaZ

    ZaZ Super Model Super Moderator

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    Asking only Consumer Reports subscribers is likely to skew the data one way or the other.

    Any maker can have a lemon, but you picked the wrong Sonic. I could tell while I was driving it the first time, I didn't like the 1.4L manual. To me the Sonic is exactly what you want in a commuter car - it's quiet, handles nicely and gets good, not great, mileage(now that gas is selling for around $1.69 a gallon here, great mileage isn't required).
     
  3. MidnightSun

    MidnightSun Emodicon

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    Just paid $3.15/gallon for premium gas for my BRZ :(
     
  4. radji

    radji Farewell, Solenya...

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    Welcome to Southern California. Where gas prices are about as mercurial as Donald Duck on a bender.
     
    booboo12 and MidnightSun like this.
  5. PatchySan

    PatchySan Om Noms Kit Kat

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    Paid double that, my recent fill up was $6 per gallon for premium gas and that's when gas prices are at its "cheapest". Though I sympathize with Norwegians as they pay even more than us for fuel.

    My most expensive was $8.46 per gallon but that was in Germany when I was filling up Aral's 102 RON Super Unleaded, we don't have this fuel in my country (our highest RON is 99) so since it was a one-off trip I decided to try it. Needless to say my car really loved that stuff.
     
  6. Melody

    Melody How's It Made Addict

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    Consumer reports is spotty because their multiple lists have often contradicted themselves. The fact that Audi is #3 in Tsunade-hime's link (putting it above the Japanese brands such as Honda, Subaru and Mazda) but that in another of their lists (I believe it's in the 5 year consumer reliability index) it placed "under average" in terms of reliability should point to that. Add to the fact that painting a brush on a brand when specific models are probably of varying levels of reliability is also skewed. Honda has had issues in the early 2000s with some of their automatic transmissions for example but if you owned a manual transmission car, you'd have thought it was totally fine. Sometimes specific models or even specific combinations of features yield problems.

    As far as expenses go, I blame the depreciation of vehicles. Anyone and their mother can afford an entry level luxury vehicle these days with low interest payments or lease rates, but these vehicles were designed and engineered with the thinking that their owners had money and as such, decisions made concerning the car reflect this.

    Fact is, luxury is expensive, hence the term. Notice how even Scott Khilmer (whether you agree with his videos/methods or not is another story) uses a Lexus as an example as to why a luxury car is "expensive":
     
  7. ZaZ

    ZaZ Super Model Super Moderator

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    I would point out that at the time I bought, the Fit was about $1,000 more than the Sonic and you had to pay a significant amount more for roadside. Plus, I liked the Sonic more. I can't imagine I'd spend enough in repairs, barring extremely bad luck, to make up for those factors, even if the Fit is more reliable. Of course everyone's story is different.

    Consumer Reports is an odd duck. They pretty much ragged on the Sonic the whole video review, but recommended it. It and the Fit are I believe the two subcompacts they've been recommending the last few years. They couldn't say enough good things about the Fit, yet it scored only one point higher than the Sonic. I will say the Sanyo I purchased at Walmark five years ago based on CRs opinions, which I was reluctant to buy being it was a Sanyo, has been an excellent acquisition. I see newer TVs with all the bells and whistles, but the PQs not as good, which is all I care about.
     
  8. radji

    radji Farewell, Solenya...

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    Two things to consider:

    1. European vehicles are far more fuel efficient than their US counterparts.
    2. Americans drive much further on average for commuting, etc. on a daily basis.
     
  9. Tsunade_Hime

    Tsunade_Hime such bacon. wow

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    A majority of Audi's are fairly reliable, their major troublespot was the mid-late 90's (B5 era of VW/Audi products). They've generally reused the same powertrains over the years and across models. If you don't get the extremely high end luxury series German luxury cars, they aren't that much worse than your normal car. But...when European cars DO break (and they all will), it costs an arm and a leg to fix. I believe they look at long term reliability, and sure Honda has had troublespots with their automatic transmissions (Odyssey, Accord, the Tiptronic 6 speed autos in the TL and CL Type-S), the overall long term prognosis of Honda is good. But you look at Chrysler or Dodge products over the past 10-15 years, it's absolutely terrible.

    Actually Lexus broke the barrier in the 80s, when it showed the world that Japan could make an actual luxury car, and that having a top flagship luxury car LS400 could be luxurious AND reliable. I believe 20-30% of LS400 sales were to competitor luxury brands who stripped it apart and found its quality could not be matched with their current production line.

    I don't think that is the case. Why would people want to report false claims? When you go to survey random people, which the only difference here is it just basing it off Consumer Reports subscribers, why would that skew the results? The results are very much inline with actuality, Fiat Chrysler automobiles are terrible, European makes are mid pack, and in general Japanese car brands are typically the most reliable.

    I did not pick the Sonic. It's actually pretty comfortable, and I've ridden in the backseat, it's fine. The seats aren't the greatest, but it's a subcompact, can't really complain much. The interior is far better than the past subcompacts/compacts from GM in many many years. Like I said it's not that bad of a car, unfortunately ours is pretty bad track record for reliability. Actually our 1.4 turbo gets like near 30 mpg combined if you don't drive like a psycho and it approaches near 40 mpg if you shut it up into 6th gear quick. Like I said, American cars have far improved and that only helps the competition. If every segment in the industry had top tier players fighting for top spot, that would encourage competition and overall make cars better. Japanese cars have gotten very stagnant in the past 10-15 years because they had no real competition (Civic, Accord, Camry, etc). But now that American compacts/mid sized cars have moved a step in the right direction, Japanese brands now have actually pushed back and made a new effort (2016 Civic, Camry, Corolla) and that's good news for consumers.

    I'm enjoying 1.83 for regular gas. :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2016
  10. MidnightSun

    MidnightSun Emodicon

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    Another problem with Consumer Reports reliability stats is that their "reliability" figures are oversimplified. Problems with a fiddly and buggy entertainment system, while annoying, are definitely not as consequential as powertrain problems.

    Yikes. Filling up my BRZ typically costs me anywhere from $20-28 depending when I decide to stop at the gas station. At $40-56 per fillup, my wallet would be crying.

    Something else that's entertaining to think about is that at that price, it'd easily cost $100+ to top off the ambulance after every shift at my old job... which would be more than a day's earnings!
     
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