Portable non-Gaming 15 inch 4K Display Laptop

Discussion in 'What Notebook Should I Buy?' started by TuxDude, Dec 5, 2016.

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  1. TuxDude

    TuxDude Notebook Deity

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    Yes, I'd much rather prefer the IGP version than the nVidia or the AMD graphics cards for the very same reason you mention, linux compatibility especially in terms of battery life goes down. The open source or even the proprietary drivers for linux for these cards are no where near the quality/feature spec as the Windows equivalent.

    Since you own the Studio G3, could you share your experiences both good and bad? Especially quality of the screen, keyboard and touchpad?
     
  2. win32asmguy

    win32asmguy Moderator Moderator

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    Its a really nice machine, to address your concerns:
    • Keyboard - Easy to type on, and the layout makes it easy for me to switch between an external and internal keyboard. I actually appreciate having Home / End / Page Up / Page Down on the right side, unlike the Precision 5510's layout. They do the same on their 14 inch Ultrabooks, and it works well. The keys have a good travel to them and I don't make too many mistakes, although I am probably not the fastest touch typist in my family.
    • Trackpad - It is an oversized clickpad provided by Alps. Luckily it can operate in non-precision mode so it is quite configurable and works well. The surface has a nice feel to it, but I do miss the dedicated buttons. It is sad that they could not put them in - I don't think it was an engineering issue because the Elitebook 840 G3 does have them and is just as thin.
    • Screen - Choices are either a FHD Matte panel (provided by LG or Samsung) or a UHD Matte panel provided by Sharp. The UHD panel is wide-gamut (>95% aRGB according to manufacturer specs) so its a nice panel for color sensitive work if your workflow can deal with DPI scaling. The FHD panel is not as good gamut but it can still be calibrated and external displays are always an option at a work desk.
    The build quality is great. Much better than most consumer machines. I think this machine was an iteration on the original Omen 15. Older bios's had trouble with the system fans pulsing (and generally running out of control) but that has been fixed with the newest one released last month. Some people received keyboards that were flexing and / or had loose keys. I think HP may have had a keyboard vendor with some QA issues earlier this year. You can kind of consider this model as a Skulltrail NUC laptop, except without Iris Pro.
     
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  3. Zenobia K'eal

    Zenobia K'eal Notebook Consultant

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  4. TuxDude

    TuxDude Notebook Deity

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  5. edit1754

    edit1754 Notebook Prophet

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    When shopping for laptops with super-high-resolution displays, make sure you do your research to make sure you're getting a true high-resolution display, and not an RG/BW Pentile display. RG/BW Pentile is a cheap trick some manufacturers use in order to gain the ability to advertise as a particular resolution, without actually achieving the full detail of the resolution.

    Laptops known to use false high-resolution displays:
    • Dell Inspiron 15.6" 4K models
    • ASUS UX3, UX5, Q series QHD+, UHD
    • Samsung Notebook QHD, QHD+, UHD
    • HP Spectre 13t QHD+
    • HP Pavilion, Omen 15.6" UHD
    • 15.6" Clevo w/ the G-Sync Samsung 4K
    • MSI Ghost Pro 4K
    • Old IdeaPads: Yoga 900 QHD+, Y50 UHD
    • Toshiba Radius 4K 15.6"
    Laptops known to use true high-resolution displays:
    • Dell XPS 13, XPS 15
    • New IdeaPads: Yoga 710/910, Y700 UHD
    • HP Spectre x360 13.3" QHD
    • HP Pavilion, Omen 17.3" UHD
    • 15.6" Clevo models w/ the Sharp 4K
    • MSI Ghost Pro 3K (2880x1620)
    • Toshiba Radius 4K 12.5"
    • All Alienware and Razer Blade
    • All Gigabyte and Aorus
    • All Lenovo, Dell, HP business-class
    • All other 17.3" QHD and UHD
    • Most 13.3" and 14" models w/ QHD
    • All Microsoft SurfaceBook models
    • All Retina Macbooks
    All the options mentioned in this thread so far are do have true high-resolution displays.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2016
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  6. crashnburn

    crashnburn Notebook Consultant

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    I had no idea about something like this.. Is there detailed write up/ article about this?
     
  7. edit1754

    edit1754 Notebook Prophet

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    There are a number of articles, but many of them provide incomplete info, or miss the point entirely.

    Some articles talk about how "the added white subpixel improves brightness" but don't mention that the layout itself no longer gives each "pixel" the ability to independently produce any color. Or that the higher brightness comes at a cost of color fidelity, and that there are better ways of achieving higher brightness and/or power savings that don't require sacrificing color fidelity or cheating the very definition of resolution. Sharp handled this nicely with IGZO by developing new thinner transistors so the gaps between pixels can be smaller and more of the backlight can shine through.

    Some articles start to acknowledge that there are "only two subpixels per pixel" but finish off saying "it's to achieve higher resolutions more easily" which isn't entirely true. RG/BW exists in order for manufacturers to gain the ability to advertise higher resolutions without actually achieving the full detail of the resolutions. Real-RGB 2880x1620 displays produce better pictures than false-3840x2160 displays, but the market is saturated with the false-4K displays because manufacturers want to claim the 4K moniker.

    Many professional laptop reviews also miss the point, for example this ASUS UX501 review, which its line "Asus is also sticking to the RGBW pixel grid to provide more accurate colors at the cost of some contrast." This review compares the UX501 and the XPS 15 and notes that the XPS 15's display looks subjectively better, but still calls the UX501 3840x2160 without covering the RG/BW issue at all.

    I don't think there's one definitive article that gets it all right.
     
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  8. crashnburn

    crashnburn Notebook Consultant

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    And Surface Pros?
     
  9. crashnburn

    crashnburn Notebook Consultant

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    What about Surface Pros? Did you include them when you said Surface?
     
  10. edit1754

    edit1754 Notebook Prophet

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    The Surface Pro resolutions are the real deal too
     
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