Porsche Taycan WORLD EXCLUSIVE genuine first drive & launch control testing 0-200kph | Fully Charged

Discussion in 'Motorized Vehicles' started by hmscott, Aug 12, 2019.

  1. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    It's amazing how regular the power delivery is, over and over and over, for 30 full performance runs at 0-220kph+ (136mph+) - and still has power enough to get you home (maybe), lots more details in the video.

    Porsche Taycan WORLD EXCLUSIVE genuine first drive & launch control testing 0-200kph | Fully Charged
    Premiered Aug 9, 2019
    The Fully Charged Show is given exclusive access to get Jonny Smith behind the wheel of the new first Porsche all electric car - the Taycan - and drive it full throttle from 0-124 mph (200 km/h) dozens of times. The Taycan is a twin motor 600+hp, 96kWh, 800-volt 4-door 4-seater coupe with a supposed range of 320 miles (≈ 515 km) . It can reach 0-62 mph (0 -100 km/h) in just over 3 seconds repeatedly, and can rapid charge at over 250kW. With a charging time ≈ 0 - 80% in about 40 minutes.
    Prices for this 'Turbo' launch model will be around £130,000 ( ≈ €141k or USD $158k) with cheaper/slower versions kicking off around £65,000 within 18 months of the car's launch in late 2019.
    The Taycan is potentially as much of a milestone for Porsche as the aircooled flat six 911 was, taking aspects of the new 992, 911 and Panamera, but is ground-up all new. Jonny was allowed to take the genuine first drive of the car alone for some 30 full throttle launches, but the final spec and aesthetic details of the Taycan still remain under embargo. The full story is on Jonny's blog entry on our website:
    https://fullycharged.show/blog/porsch...


    Still, it sounds like a sewing machine to me... :)
     
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  2. Convel

    Convel Notebook Deity

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    Looking forward to the 4th of September, its world premiere! It's nice to see Porsche entering the sports sedan segment full-thrust, and with a BEV at that. They're doing it proper too, with a keen attention to driving dynamics and build quality. Three-chamber air suspension, 48-volt active anti-roll bars, rear-wheel steering, limited-slip differential, permanent-magnet synchronous AC motors, two-speed gearbox... the recipe for something far more exciting than first-attempt electric SUVs goes on. The steering wheel is straight from a 992 911, and the seating position is similar as well. Not to mention, Porsches tend to be configurable enough to adhere to most people's tastes. The biggest letdown is that the earlier quoted 350 kW fast-charging won't be available until 2021, but 250 kW charging will be available at launch. Whether this upgrade will be available to earlier models is yet unknown.

    https://www.motortrend.com/news/2020-porsche-taycan-review-electric-car-tesla-fighter
    https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/a28662827/2020-porsche-taycan-prototype-ride/
     
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  3. Convel

    Convel Notebook Deity

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    The interior of the Taycan has now been fully revealed. It's fairly slick and familiar, but it also appears to forego one button too many. I find the 911 992 to strike an ideal balance between satisfying physical buttons and knobs for essential vehicle controls, climate, and volume, while relegating entertainment to the touchscreen. The Taycan shouldn't have quite the same issue as a certain rival, due to segmenting different controls between different touchscreens, and adding haptic feedback akin to the e-Tron, but I think many would still prefer a few buttons here and there. I'll reserve actual judgement until I've tried using it in person. Chances are the controls on the steering wheel, as well as voice commands, will offset the display extravaganza to some degree.

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    https://www.motor1.com/news/366633/porsche-taycan-interior-revealed-official/

    On the other hand, I am a fan of the cockpit area. It doesn't rely on a flat, almost rectangular, display as most competitors' virtual cockpits. Instead, it looks appropriately futuristic and focused. Beneath the virtual instrument cluster, there's finally a start-stop button instead of the fused keyfob of other Porsches, and there's a physical park button, as well as a drive selector handle. The crown-jewel is the GT wheel, straight from a 911 992, which doesn't stop short of being brilliant.

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    There's now also an official Nürburgring lap time — a four-door EV record at that for the Taycan Turbo, coming in at 7:42 with Lars Kern at the wheel. Footnotes include this being the 20.6-km (12.8-mile) configuration of the track, as well as the interior having been equipped with roll bars and a bucket seat. While there are professionally-driven laps for the Tesla Model 3 and Model S around the world, there are none at the Nürburgring, which makes sense given how lengthy it is. The Model 3 LR can post decent lap times around shorter circuits, but its brakes start to fade after 5-6 minutes. The Model S, at least before the recent Model 3 engine upgrade, would generate too much heat and start to lose power well before finishing a lap around the green hell when driven flat out.

    Despite its lower centre of gravity, the Taycan still lost by a small margin to the equally heavy Panamera Turbo. The 4.0-litre twin-turbo V8 can propel the Panamera to greater speeds than the Taycan at long, straight stretches of the track, whereas the Taycan Turbo appears to have topped out at 259 km/h (161 mph) during its run. I reckon the Taycan would have the edge at tracks with more frequent heavy deaccelerations.

    https://www.motor1.com/news/367076/taycan-four-door-ev-nurburgring-record/
     
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  4. Convel

    Convel Notebook Deity

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    Apparently, the Taycan has a very short, but powerful overboost window of just 2.5 seconds, tailored to doing violent 0-60 mph runs. As much as Porsche claim not to be benchmarking the Tesla Model S, it seems they're fairly busy making sure the Taycan takes home as many wins as possible.

    https://www.motor1.com/news/367475/2020-porsche-taycan-power-details/

    Since we're only a week away from the Frankfurt Motor Show unveiling, more pre-series journalist impressions are also rolling in.

    https://www.motortrend.com/news/exclusive-beyond-150mph-porsche-taycan ← includes a short video
    https://www.automobilemag.com/news/2020-porsche-taycan-ev-review-drive-tesla-fighter/

    ← in German
     
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  5. Convel

    Convel Notebook Deity

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    At long last, no more camouflage! It should be clear from the get-go that this is no Tesla Model S P100D killer. Sure, the Turbo S may do 0-60 MPH in 2.6 seconds, 0-124 mph in 9.8 seconds, and have similar dimensions as well as a 93.4-kWh battery, but the most obvious difference out of the gate is exclusivity: the Turbo S starts at a whopping $186,350. The Taycan is also more track-focused, with repeatable performance, active aero, 800-volt architecture (greatly reduces thermals and charging times, while increasing recuperation), a sporty chassis, and clever suspension. There's also quality, personalisation, and a luxurious interior to factor in.

    But still, if straight line performance and range is your game (the Taycan Turbo does up to 450 km/280 miles WLTP), the Taycan makes Tesla's vehicles look like absolute bargains. It's a bit disappointing to see only the expensive Turbo and Turbo S at launch, as the Carrera 4S should be far more reasonable. The cheapest variant should be a RWD, 80-kWh variant, likely called the Carrera S and launched after the 4S. If the cheaper variants are not priced right, I don't see Porsche selling a lot of Taycans outside of countries where electric cars have a massive tax benefit.






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    https://www.motorauthority.com/news/1124887_2020-porsche-taycan-preview-price-specs-photos

    And we only have to wait until the 10th for another major EV reveal: the Volkswagen ID. 3!
     
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  6. Vingard

    Vingard Notebook Consultant

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    Curious to see what resale values are like three years from now. May pick one up at that point...
     
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  7. Convel

    Convel Notebook Deity

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    I'd say the chances of them dropping more quickly than their ICE equivalents are quite high. There's been talks of versions with refreshed batteries coming in a couple of years or so, and at 270 kW, the charging is still not as fast as Porsche would have liked. The Mission E had 350 kW on paper, and they're now talking about 400 to 500 kW in the near future, when infrastructure allows it. Whether the bottleneck is truly software and infrastructure remains to be seen. If the current batteries are also a limiting factor, shorter range and slower charging could make the current models less desireable on the second hand market once newer variants have arrived. The Cross Turismo may also have a slight impact short-term when it arrives late next year, because it will be a fresh model and some will look to increase their cargo capacity.

    There's also a lot of competition inbound for the coming years also, where the sister vehicle, the Audi e-Tron GT, could undercut the Taycan considerably. Not to mention having a more luxurious take on the BEV is not a bad idea either, and I'm sure the Mercedes EQS will deliver.
     
  8. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Marques takes on Porsche, I think Porsche is in trouble. :)

    Let's Talk About Porsche Taycan!
    Marques Brownlee
    Published on Sep 4, 2019
    Porsche Taycan stacks up against Tesla Model S. Specs don't tell the whole story!
     
  9. Convel

    Convel Notebook Deity

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    Disclaimer: I didn't watch the whole video yet, so this is more of a general rant about how Tesla fanboys tend to perceive electric vehicles from any other marque. I will edit my post later on if I see it fit. I will also add that there's nothing wrong about liking Teslas or admiring Tesla as a company, but the attitude of fanboys can get a bit tiresome. I hope I'm not stepping on anyone's toes.
    I can pretty much guarantee you virtually no Porsche owner, or potential Porsche owner, thinks like a Tesla fanboy. Why do I call the YouTuber a fanboy? He has a Tesla surfboard in the back, he doesn't actually care much about the Taycan other than to know which metrics the fastest-accelerating Tesla model beats it in, or to even learn how 'Taycan' is supposed to be pronounced. It's the same rhetoric you see in the comment section of any electric vehicle on the internet, and in the case of the Taycan, Tesla no longer even holds the crown in every numerable metric (charging time, 0-200 kmh, top speed, consecutive accelerations, and lap times), but they almost never bring up other numbers. They're also not keen to wait until real-world comparisons can be made before passing judgement. While I'm sure the P100D will beat the Turbo S in some regards, Porsche tends to provide conservative numbers, and actual hands-on experience with both is needed to have a meaningful comparison anyhow.

    I think most reviewers would also agree that the Model S is no longer the golden electric standard. Sure, it might be more expensive, have a longer range, and accelerate harder than the Model 3 LR, but the Model 3 has more up-to-date technology, a new exterior and interior design, as well as better handling and thermals. Still, Teslas are not for everyone. Every new electric model shouldn't be summarised only in numbers, and then compared to Tesla, because there are people out there who are cross-buying luxurious or sporty ICE vehicles from legacy automakers with those very automakers' new electric offerings, rather than Teslas.

    I get it. Specs are important, and I like to look at them too. But I also know specs alone are a terrible way to get a feel for what a car is like to own and drive.

    I actually test drove four electric vehicles this summer: Model 3 RWD LR, Model 3 AWD LR (Performance), Audi e-tron, and Mercedes EQC. The general impression of the Model 3 was pretty good. I only found very minor problems with panel gaps and the paint jobs; nothing that would cause me to worry. Interior panels, while a bit soft in some places, were also free of any creaking, so I think the quality issues reported by Tesla haters are a bit blown out of proportions, though two cars is a very limited sample base. Having a large charging network is also very reassuring, though certain European countries seem to have a shorter distance between fast chargers in general than elsewhere. Onto more positives, well, the acceleration is huge, but I don't see myself putting the pedal to the metal very often if it were my own car and I drove it on public roads. Fun to have, sure, but it's not what defines a good vehicle... or how sporty it feels on narrow, twisty roads. Because the Model 3 didn't feel very sporty or luxurious to me. It seems to handle quite well, especially considering its price, but you don't feel connected through the steering, chassis, or seating position. The seats were not all that comfortable to me; they were perfectly fine for shorter errands, but if I were going on a road trip, I can think of better cruisers. The biggest negative for me, however, was the amount of wheel noise... I found myself circling back to the Model 3, wanting to like it because it's a lot for the money and it makes the most sense when you look at its spec sheet, but I'm not sure I could live with a cabin that noisy, honestly. It's more apparent in an electric than an ICE vehicle because the rest of the cabin is so quiet.

    Then there's Autopilot. Autopilot is clearly optimised exclusively for wider, American roads as it frequently malfunctioned and failed to read speed limits correctly — this in particular came as a shock to me given all the convincing videos and hype surrounding the functionality, and I asked Tesla staff about it afterwards. The best answer they could give me was that Autopilot is still in beta. Really, I'm sure it's brilliant on different roads, but on roads familiar to me, I'd much rather have an adaptive cruise control system from a luxuary legacy carmaker, or even a cruise control that isn't adaptive. It was useless in my test conditions.

    Overall, there's a lot to like about what Tesla has achieved and how capable the Model 3 is, particularly at its price. At least if we don't compare it to the Taycan (the jury is still out), it has the most sophisticated and efficient platform, as well as some very good batteries, thanks to their early partnership with Panasonic. It's easy to see why it's become so popular. Yet, I found both the e-Tron and EQC more desireable. They don't match or beat the Model 3 in a single metric I can think of, other than cargo space. But they're far more comfortable to be in, and give you a more connected feel, despite their crossover nature. Without a shadow of a doubt, they feel more luxurious: they both have great, ventilated seats, and where the e-Tron has haptic feedback in its displays, the EQC has a killer Burmester sound system and a nice, fresh interior trim. They both have head-up displays, and the new ID. 3 will even have an AR display. Oh, and did I mention the cabins, especially of the EQC iirc, are exceptionally isolated from outside noise?

    Simply put, Tesla still has a lot to learn from luxuary automakers in terms of creature comforts, tactility, personalisation, and desirability, while traditional automakers have some catching up to do in terms of lowering weight, increasing performance, increasing range, and offer it all at more sane prices. Neither is for everyone, and I'm glad we have choice.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2019
  10. Convel

    Convel Notebook Deity

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