Planes Thread

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Jarhead, Dec 29, 2015.

  1. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Lost & Found Nº1: The Imperial Airway | British Pathé
    British Pathé
    Published on Apr 24, 2019
    Lost & Found Nº1: The Imperial Airway: The Work Of The British Airways (1924)
    This British Pathé film, missing from our archive for decades, has just been discovered in another collection. Take a look at a film we have lost and found.

    (Film ID 1323.11)

    BRITISH PATHÉ'S STORY
    Before television, people came to movie theatres to watch the news. British Pathé was at the forefront of cinematic journalism, blending information with entertainment to popular effect. Over the course of a century, it documented everything from major armed conflicts and seismic political crises to the curious hobbies and eccentric lives of ordinary people. If it happened, British Pathé filmed it.

    Now considered to be the finest newsreel archive in the world, British Pathé is a treasure trove of 85,000 films unrivalled in their historical and cultural significance.

    British Pathé also represents the Reuters historical collection, which includes more than 120,000 items from the news agencies Gaumont Graphic (1910-1932), Empire News Bulletin (1926-1930), British Paramount (1931-1957), and Gaumont British (1934-1959), as well as Visnews content from 1957 to the end of 1979. All footage can be viewed on the British Pathé website. https://www.britishpathe.com/

    A VIDEO FROM BRITISH PATHÉ. EXPLORE OUR ONLINE CHANNEL, BRITISH PATHÉ TV. IT'S FULL OF GREAT DOCUMENTARIES, FASCINATING INTERVIEWS, AND CLASSIC MOVIES.http://www.britishpathe.tv/

    FOR LICENSING ENQUIRIES VISIT http://www.britishpathe.com/
     
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  2. killkenny1

    killkenny1 Too weird to live, too rare to die.

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    Looks like one of the flying machines Dick Dastardly would build.

    [​IMG]

     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2019
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  3. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    America's First Jet Flight, October 1942
    AmericaMDCCLXXVI
    Published on Feb 11, 2008
    First Jet Flight


    Planes That Never Flew - America's First Jet Fighter
    illusive 0ne
    Published on Oct 20, 2011
    [The Thumbnail shows broken, but the video plays fine. Click video to play]


    These guys restored a post WW2 fighter, converted to target tower, converted back, several good videos, in this one they take flight, @ about 14:20
    Hawker Sea Fury First Flight 1.jpg

    Dwelle Hawker Sea Fury First Flight
    rogerawhite
    Published on Sep 28, 2017
    First flight of Dwelle's restored 1953 Hawker Sea Fury. July 1, 2017. Auburn Airport, CA.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2019
  4. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg answers questions at the company's shareholder meeting
    CNBC Television
    Published on Apr 29, 2019
    Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg answers questions at the company's shareholder meeting after a series of plane crashes involving the company's 737 Max 8 aircraft. Muilenburg assured shareholders that the plane is safe after a software fix and the company will rebuild trust.
     
  5. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Where jumbo jets go to die - The great aeroplane graveyard | 60 Minutes Australia
    60 Minutes Australia
    Published on Apr 11, 2019
    Take a flight through the twilight zone to the big hangar in the sky. The place where jumbo jets go to die. The great aeroplane graveyard. In 2014, Charles Wooley was given a one way ticket to the middle of nowhere (but somehow he made his way back!) to report on this most amazing of spectacles. You might think it's a story about the decline of the airline industry, but in fact it's the exact opposite.
     
  6. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    The Economics That Made Boeing Build the 737 Max
    Wendover Productions
    Published on Apr 30, 2019
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2019
  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Rogue Boeing 737 Max planes ‘with minds of their own’ | 60 Minutes Australia
    60 Minutes Australia
    Published on May 5, 2019
    Liz Hayes investigates the disaster of Boeing’s 737 MAX jetliner. Why two supposedly state-of-the-art and safe planes crashed killing 346 people; why pilots now fear flying the 737 MAX; & whether Boeing could have averted the catastrophes.


    Boeing never tested the failure of critical AOA sensor

    CNN
    Published on Apr 30, 2019
    A CNN investigation of the Boeing 737 Max aircraft uncovers a history of issues with one component being blamed for two deadly crashes. Boeing insists nothing is wrong with the design, blaming pilots for not following proper procedure. CNN's Drew Griffin takes a closer look.


    Boeing relied on single sensor for 737 Max that had been flagged 216 times to FAA
    By Curt Devine and Drew Griffin, CNN, Updated 8:20 PM ET, Tue April 30, 2019
    https://www.cnn.com/2019/04/30/politics/boeing-sensor-737-max-faa/index.html

    Boeing says 'standard' alert system was not operable on all Max 737 airplanes
    By Michelle Toh, CNN Business, Updated 5:26 PM ET, Tue April 30, 2019
    https://www.cnn.com/2019/04/30/business/boeing-737-max-alert/index.html

    Boeing admits cockpit warning light on Max jets was to be standard but wasn't activated
    CBS This Morning
    Published on Apr 30, 2019
    Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg defended the safety systems of its 737 Max jets in his first comments to shareholders and reporters since two deadly crashes involving the best-selling plane. Those crashes killed 346 people and led to the worldwide grounding of the Max jets. A growing number of potential whistleblowers are raising safety concerns. Kris Van Cleave reports.


    Boeing did not warn airlines of deactivated warning system: WSJ reports
    CNBC Television
    Published on Apr 29, 2019
    The Wall Street Journal reports that Boeing did not tell Southwest Airlines, its biggest 737 Max customer, that a safety feature designed to warn pilots about a malfunctioning sensor had been deactivated. The Journal also reports that investigators are looking into a dozen whistleblower complaints alleging safety problems with Boeing's 737 Max jets.

    Boeing's issue is convincing customers their solution is sufficient: WSJ reporter
    CNBC Television
    Published on Apr 29, 2019
    Boeing is hosting its annual meeting today at its corporate headquarters in Chicago. This comes following a new report from the Wall Street Journal, which found Boeing did not tell its largest customer Southwest Airlines that the safety feature designed to alert pilots about malfunctioning sensors had been turned off. Andy Pasztor, the author of the report

    Boeing must show customers that they care about safety: Expert
    CNBC Television
    Published on Apr 29, 2019

    FAA / JATR International regulators meet in Seattle over Boeing 737 MAX
    KING 5
    Published on May 1, 2019
    The Federal Aviation Administration confirms regulators from nine countries are meeting at an FAA facility in the Seattle area this week to look at the 737 MAX's automated flight control system and how to improve the certification of jets in the future.
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2019
  8. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    737 UPDATE plus Sukhoi Crash in Moscow and Jacksonville Runway over run
    blancolirio
    Published on May 7, 2019
    More incidents in one week that I can keep up with...listen fast.


    Why 737 Max matters

    KING 5
    Published on May 8, 2019
    A Boeing 737 takes off somewhere every 15 seconds. As the world's most popular airliner, nearly 3 out of every 4 airplanes Boeing delivers, is a 737 in Renton. As part of Boeing's business, analysts estimate it accounts for half of Boeing's airline revenues, about 30 billion dollars a year. KING 5's Glenn Farley reports.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2019
  9. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Allied Pilots Association's Dan Carey discusses tense meeting with Boeing about 737 MAX 8
    The Dallas Morning News
    Published on May 13, 2019
    Allied Pilots Association president and American Airlines Captain Dan Carey discusses pilots concerns about the Boeing 737 MAX 8 after sharing a recording from a November meeting with Boeing. (DMN video/editing: Tom Fox)


    Shocker: Boeing knew of faulty 737s in 2017

    RT America
    Published on May 6, 2019
    Airline manufacturer Boeing raised eyebrows over the weekend when the company announced it was aware back in 2017 of problems with a key safety indicator in the 737 Max 8 jets. Still, they refused to inform airlines or the Federal Aviation Administration until after the Lion Air crash in October that killed everyone on board. RT’s Ashlee Banks reports on the latest. To break down the situation, RT America’s Manila Chan turns to former National Transportation Safety Board Director of Public and Family Affairs Jamie Finch.


    'Software delivered to Boeing' now blamed for 737 MAX warning fiasco
    Engineers knew of problem in 2017. Management didn't until after fatal crash
    By Gareth Corfield 7 May 2019 at 11:57
    https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/05/07/boeing_blames_software_737_max_aoa_warning_captions/

    "As the 737 MAX scandal rolls on, "software delivered to Boeing" has been blamed by the company for the malfunctioning of a safety display.

    In a statement issued over the weekend, the American airliner manufacturer admitted that its software was not properly displaying fleet-standard warning captions to pilots. This admission comes after sustained media reporting over cockpit angle-of-attack (AOA) displays and warnings, one of which was sold by Boeing to airlines as an optional extra for their aircraft.

    Warning captions (wording that flashes up on the pilot's display screen) on the 737 MAX included one, AOA Disagree, which alerted the pilots if the 737 MAX's two AOA sensors were delivering different readings from each other. If the two go out of sync, the logic goes, one must therefore be faulty.

    Worse, Boeing engineers knew about the problem in 2017 – months before the fatal Lion Air and Ethiopian Airways crashes. The company only revealed this to US Federal Aviation Authority regulators after Lion Air flight JT610 crashed in October 2018, claiming in this week's statement that "the issue did not adversely impact airplane safety or operation".

    "Senior company leadership was not involved in the review and first became aware of this issue in the aftermath of the Lion Air accident," added Boeing.

    The AOA sensors feed the controversial MCAS trim system, another software feature that did not work properly. Improper MCAS activations seemingly caused by faulty AOA readings are suspected to have contributed to two fatal Boeing 737 MAX crashes within the last year, costing hundreds of lives.

    Boeing said the 737 MAX's "display system software did not correctly meet the AOA Disagree alert requirements", adding that "software delivered to Boeing linked the AOA Disagree alert to the AOA indicator, which is an optional feature on the MAX" and earlier versions of the 737.

    "Accordingly," continued Boeing, "the software activated the AOA Disagree alert only if an airline opted for the AOA indicator."

    This was not what should have happened. Even if an airline didn't pay extra for the AOA indicator display gauge (pictured here on a schematic for earlier 737 versions than the MAX), if the sensors went out of sync, a warning should have been shown to the pilots.

    AOA gauges have been offered as a feature on Boeing 737s since the mid-1990s 737-600 model, known in marketing terms as the first of the 737 Next Generation (NG). The NG series, comprising the 737-600, -700 and -800 models, preceded the controversial MAX series.

    Boeing is now issuing a display system software update to correct this fault, it said. This is on top of a promised software update to MCAS to stop it from attempting to push the 737 MAX's nose towards the ground. "

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    Last edited: May 14, 2019
  10. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Over $300M invested in the conversion of the TWA Terminal into the TWA Hotel...

    Flight of fancy: The TWA Hotel

    CBS Sunday Morning
    Published on May 12, 2019
    When Trans World Airlines went bankrupt in 2001, it looked like the end for architect Eero Saarinen's classic TWA Terminal at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, one of the most distinctive buildings in the world. But it was rescued from the bulldozer by building preservationists, and the magnetic terminal that once drew air travelers has now been transformed into the nostalgic TWA Hotel, which recalls the glamour of '60s jet-setting aviation. Kris Van Cleave checks in.


    Connie in Times Square!
    TWA hotel
    Published on Mar 24, 2019
    Lights, camera, airplane! Our 1958 Connie swings by the Times Square site where her eight-story billboard hung from 1955-1960.


    The Transformation of the TWA Hotel's Connie
    TWA hotel
    Published on Oct 10, 2018
    After purchasing the dilapidated Connie N8083H (she was missing a nose!) in early 2018, MCR/MORSE Development partnered with Atlantic Models and Florida Air Transport to restore her to her original condition. The painstaking work — which included tracking down authentic parts, installing flooring and windows, and outfitting the cockpit with controls — was completed at Maine’s Auburn-Lewiston Airport. The finishing touch: painting her exterior (again) with authentic 1950s TWA livery. Watch the transformation!


    This is a different "TWA" Super Constellation G, engines purring...

    20110722 Super G Startup
    Jeffrey Billings
    Published on Jul 23, 2011
    National Airline History Museum Super Constellation G startup 7-22-11.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2019
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