Planes Thread

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Jarhead, Dec 29, 2015.

  1. Fishon

    Fishon I Will Close You

    Reputations:
    7,860
    Messages:
    1,334
    Likes Received:
    6,688
    Trophy Points:
    531
    hmscott likes this.
  2. Fishon

    Fishon I Will Close You

    Reputations:
    7,860
    Messages:
    1,334
    Likes Received:
    6,688
    Trophy Points:
    531
    The man, the myth, the legend...Thomas Fitzpatrick.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    At approximately 3 a.m. on September 30, 1956, Fitzpatrick, while intoxicated, stole a single engine plane in New Jersey and flew without lights or radio before landing in front of a New York City bar where earlier he had been drinking and made an intoxicated barroom bet that he could travel from New Jersey to New York City in 15 minutes. People called the flight a "feat of aeronautics" and a "fine landing". For his illegal flight, he was fined $100 after the plane's owner refused to press charges.

    On October 4, 1958 just before 1 a.m., Fitzpatrick, again intoxicated, stole another plane from the same airfield and landed on Amsterdam and 187th street after another bar patron disbelieved his first feat. For his second stolen flight, Judge John A. Mullen sentenced him to six months in prison stating, "Had you been properly jolted then, it’s possible this would not have occurred a second time." Fitzpatick said "it's the lousy drink" that caused him to pull the stunt.

    Fitzpatrick has a mixed drink named after him for his feat called the "Late Night Flight"

    https://www.dinnerpartydownload.org/fitzpatrick/
     
  3. killkenny1

    killkenny1 Too weird to live, too rare to die.

    Reputations:
    7,660
    Messages:
    4,654
    Likes Received:
    9,533
    Trophy Points:
    581
  4. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

    Reputations:
    6,407
    Messages:
    19,715
    Likes Received:
    24,511
    Trophy Points:
    931
    Other than a rough landing, and of course the unexpected exit, he doesn't look too bad. :)



    And, now he is free. :)

    Pakistan Release Indian Pilot
    Published on Mar 1, 2019
    Captured Indian Airman Wing Commander Abhinandan has now officially crossed the border from Pakistan to India, ending his detention in Pakistani custody.(REUTERS)
    Pakistan has handed over a captured Indian pilot, giving him back to India at a border crossing. The move is seen as a gesture of peace..

    The pilot, identified as Wing Commander Abhinandan Varthaman, was taken in a convoy that set out from the eastern Pakistani city of Lahore to the border crossing at Wagah earlier in the day, escorted by military vehicles with soldiers, their weapons drawn.

    The Pakistani military has said his plane was downed on the Pakistani-held side of Kashmir on Wednesday.

    On the Indian side of the border, turbaned Indian policemen were lined up along the road as a group of cheering Indian residents from the area waved India's national flag and held up a huge garland of flowers to welcome the pilot back.

    https://www.voanews.com/a/pakistan-br...


    Kashmir: captured Indian pilot, freed by Pakistan
    Published on Mar 1, 2019
    Pakistan has freed an Indian fighter pilot captured after his plane was shot down in Pakistan-administered Kashmir, amid rising tensions.
    Wing Commander Abhinandan Varthaman was handed over to Indian officials near a border crossing with Pakistan.

    The pilot described his experience on Pakistani TV, adding how "very impressed" he was by the Pakistan army.

    On Thursday Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan said the pilot's release was a "peace gesture" to India.

    India and Pakistan - both nuclear powers - claim all of Kashmir, but each controls only parts of it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2019
    Fishon likes this.
  5. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

    Reputations:
    6,407
    Messages:
    19,715
    Likes Received:
    24,511
    Trophy Points:
    931
    The Rise and Fall of the A380
    Sam Chui
    Published on Feb 22, 2019
    The Airbus A380 is the largest passenger and most expensive airliner in the world. Last week, Airbus announced it will end production of the A380 in 2021. How the once promising Airbus superjumbo went from airline status symbol to reject in just 10 years? Let’s take a look at the rise and fall of the A380 in this special documentary video.
    The Airbus A380 will hold a special place in many aeroplane enthusiast’s hearts considering its status as the world’s largest passenger airline and its sophisticated, luxurious and spacious first class suites, complete even with an entire bathroom and shower. However, it is undeniable that this aeroplane did not successfully challenge the Boeing 747’s dominance in the long haul flight market, as was Airbus’s aim, and was something of a commercial failure – not only did delays in the development of the model cause much higher than projected development costs, but Airbus have admitted that they are unlikely to be able to recoup the full staggering 25 billion euro price tag on bringing this model to market. This video sheds light on went wrong for this giant of the aeroplane industry, the super jumbo jet.

    The Airbus A380 was aimed at airlines operating from airports with high levels of aeroplane congestion. With its two deck layout with space enough theoretically for 853 passengers, it seemed like the perfect plane to aim at airlines performing long haul flights with limited timeframes during each day to take off to make for a convenient arrival time at the destination. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the airline Emirates was the biggest purchaser of this model of plane, as it seemed perfect for their business model which has always involved funnelling a large volume of flights through Abu Dhabi airport.

    However, the 20th century, four engine design made the cost per seat for the airline very high and despite the extra money that customers were willing to pay to travel with increased room and comfort, and the promise by Airbus that these planes would be the answer to the highly time-slot constrained nature of major international airports such as London Heathrow, significant orders from airline giants such as British Airways never materialised.

    Though the Dubai base of the Emirates airline became a swarm of A380’s, other major international hubs like Paris, Amsterdam and Istanbul were instead thriving on smaller aeroplanes, with Airbus’s smaller A350 emerging as the apparent major future workhorse for these airports.

    Production of the A380 is set to cease in 2021, after the biggest customer for these super jumbo jets, Emirates, cancelled its most recent order for 39 of them but we can expect to see the Airbus A380 still touching down and taking off well in to the 2030’s, especially as airlines will want to get the most out of these expensive and large aeroplanes, which are not expected to have great second-hand value.

    The Airbus A380 is evidence that, at least in the aviation industry, bigger is not always better but the aeroplane will still be forever cherished as that great and luxurious whale of the skies.


    A real A380 fan :)
    https://www.youtube.com/user/N178UA/search?query=a380

    Even as the Airbus A380 has been "canceled" ANA receives it's first of 3 A380's:
    https://www.ana.co.jp/en/us/hawaii24/airbus380/

    Great Livery Paint, all 3 get unique "paint":

    Landing first Airbus A380 Ana "lani" JA381A
    Laurent Cornier
    Published on Mar 8, 2019
    Landing first Airbus A380 Ana "lani" JA381A, Toulouse Airport march 7, 2019
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2019
  6. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

    Reputations:
    6,407
    Messages:
    19,715
    Likes Received:
    24,511
    Trophy Points:
    931
    Boeing 777X Rollout Postponed
    Dj's Aviation
    Published on Mar 11, 2019
    Boeing has today postponed its rollout of the Boeing 777X. Previously set for a March 13th rollout, Boeing has said that following the events of#ET302 they will wait for a better time to show off their latest aircraft.


    More airlines ground the Boeing 737 Max after Ethiopia Airlines crash | Nine News Australia

    Nine News Australia
    Published on Mar 12, 2019
    Singapore Airlines is the latest major carrier to ground its fleet of Boeing 737 Max-8s, after the deadly crash in Ethiopia. The decision has flow-on effects for flights into Australia, while Boeing has ordered changes be made to the model by the end of the month.

    Listening to the news and industry interviews immediately after the *1st* Boeing 737 Max 8 crash in Indonesia last year, how similar it sounds to what is being said today after the 2nd crash, and how many more 737 Max planes have been added world wide since the 1st crash.

    BOEING 737 MAX 8 CRASH Warning Bulletin Alert
    News and interview clips from last year's 737 Max 8 crash
    Captain Patroni
    Published on Mar 12, 2019
    Boeing has evidently known about this problem since November of 2018 and even some PILOTS are aware of it and are concerned about the Boeing 737 MAX 8

    More Boeing 737 MAXs Grounded
    Dj's Aviation
    Published on Mar 12, 2019
    Following on from Ethiopian Airlines, Cayman Airways and the Chinese Aviation Regulatory Board multiple carriers have since grounded their Boeing 737 MAXs and MAX 8s more specifically. Tune in to find out what airlines have stopped flying the new aircraft.

    Several airlines ground Boeing 737 Max 8 planes after deadly crash
    CBS News
    Published on Mar 11, 2019
    Several airlines around the world have grounded Boeing 737 Max 8 and Max 9 planes Monday, following Ethiopian Airlines' fatal crash this weekend. The airliner was flying the plane from Ethiopia to Kenya when it crashed minutes after takeoff. Aviation analyst Todd Curtis joins CBSN to discuss safety concerns regarding the airliner.

    Ethiopian Airlines: 'No survivors' on crashed Boeing 737 - BBC News
    Published on Mar 10, 2019
    An Ethiopian Airlines jet has crashed shortly after take-off from Addis Ababa, killing all on board. The airline said 149 passengers and eight crew members were on flight ET302 from the Ethiopian capital to Nairobi in Kenya. It said 32 Kenyans, 18 Canadians, eight Americans and seven British nationals were among the passengers. The crash happened at 08:44 local time, six minutes after the months-old Boeing 737 Max-8 took off.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2019
  7. cucubits

    cucubits Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    47
    Messages:
    330
    Likes Received:
    217
    Trophy Points:
    56
    I don't understand how can American Airlines and Southwest still NOT ground these planes. I keep reading that they're among the few left who still "trust" them completely... What will it take? Another crash?

    Wild horses couldn't drag me on one of these planes now...
     
    hmscott likes this.
  8. killkenny1

    killkenny1 Too weird to live, too rare to die.

    Reputations:
    7,660
    Messages:
    4,654
    Likes Received:
    9,533
    Trophy Points:
    581
    Because FAA didn't ban them. AA and SWA trust them because they operate a large number of them. Ceasing voluntarily the type's operation would mean huge delays and profit loses. Unless FAA grounds them, I doubt these airlines will do anything.

    EDIT: apparently EASA banned 737MAX ops in Europe. Ban effective from 19:00 UTC.
    https://www.easa.europa.eu/newsroom...j8r3Mw0NIUCJZKG6_Y5UDKuH3XbyvVXUgnKLR4FGDsS_k
    Switzerland also ban the A/C from their airspace.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2019
    hmscott likes this.
  9. Fishon

    Fishon I Will Close You

    Reputations:
    7,860
    Messages:
    1,334
    Likes Received:
    6,688
    Trophy Points:
    531
  10. Fishon

    Fishon I Will Close You

    Reputations:
    7,860
    Messages:
    1,334
    Likes Received:
    6,688
    Trophy Points:
    531
Loading...

Share This Page