Planes Thread

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Jarhead, Dec 29, 2015.

  1. Fishon

    Fishon I Will Close You

    Reputations:
    7,809
    Messages:
    1,334
    Likes Received:
    6,138
    Trophy Points:
    531
    On the way to Hawaii, Alaska Airlines left one of our bags behind in San Diego. We were one of two. They did deliver it the place we were staying the next day, and allowed up to $500 for anything we needed to buy before they delivered it. We bought $180 worth of stuff and they reimbursed.

    Many people flew out early to avoid the hurricane, so the flight back as about 2/3 full. Nice to have an empty seat next to me.
     
  2. killkenny1

    killkenny1 Too weird to live, too rare to die.

    Reputations:
    7,558
    Messages:
    4,519
    Likes Received:
    8,902
    Trophy Points:
    581
  3. Fishon

    Fishon I Will Close You

    Reputations:
    7,809
    Messages:
    1,334
    Likes Received:
    6,138
    Trophy Points:
    531
  4. Fishon

    Fishon I Will Close You

    Reputations:
    7,809
    Messages:
    1,334
    Likes Received:
    6,138
    Trophy Points:
    531
  5. Fishon

    Fishon I Will Close You

    Reputations:
    7,809
    Messages:
    1,334
    Likes Received:
    6,138
    Trophy Points:
    531
  6. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

    Reputations:
    5,069
    Messages:
    17,787
    Likes Received:
    21,813
    Trophy Points:
    931
  7. Fishon

    Fishon I Will Close You

    Reputations:
    7,809
    Messages:
    1,334
    Likes Received:
    6,138
    Trophy Points:
    531
    I'm calling BS, as it's more for intimidation or the power of suggestion than the real thing. When they use airplanes (and they really don't any more as it's far too costly), from what I understand it's still done by a visual sighting of a car going a lot faster than the others, and no technology is used. A quick Google, and I'm not seeing any reference to any sort of tech used to track the speed of a vehicle. It may come, but not now. If anyone has heard otherwise, post it please.
    ________

    [​IMG]
     
    Nick, killkenny1 and hmscott like this.
  8. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

    Reputations:
    5,069
    Messages:
    17,787
    Likes Received:
    21,813
    Trophy Points:
    931
    Did you go to the site? It says right there on the title :)

    "Documentation of my guerrilla art project: Speed Enforced By Drones "
    _1020761.jpg
    Officer Barbour Returning My Signs

    Speed Enforced By Drones
    http://stephenwhisler.net/Sculpture/Pages/Speed_Enforced_by_Drones.html
    http://stephenwhisler.net/Stephen_Whisler.html

    Speed Enforced By Drones Bay Area Artist Creates Fake Highway Signs to Warn Drivers
    blake kim
    Published on Oct 2, 2013


    That was then.... this was 3 years later:

    Troopers use drone to speed up investigations
    KTNV Channel 13 Las Vegas
    Published on Oct 21, 2016
    Troopers with Nevada Highway Patrol are explaining how they use a drone to speed up investigations


    This is now:

    Ohio wants to use camera drones to monitor highway traffic
    Trevor Mogg, POSTED ON 6.20.18 - 10:45PM
    https://www.digitaltrends.com/cool-tech/ohio-camera-drones-monitor-highway-traffic/

    "The latest initiative to hit our radar is taking place in Ohio, which will look into the idea of using the remotely controlled flying machines to monitor traffic conditions along a stretch of highway.
    Such work is usually carried out by fixed ground-based cameras, but their viewing range is limited. Helicopters, too, can be called upon, but with pilot and fuel costs to consider, such aircraft can be hugely expensive compared to a diminutive, battery-powered drone.

    The Ohio Department of Transportation’s Drive Ohio Division, which coordinates “smart mobility” initiatives, is working with Ohio State University’s College of Engineering on a three-year, $6-million project to learn more about how drones can be used to effectively monitor traffic conditions.

    The research will take place along the Smart Mobility Corridor, a 35-mile stretch of U.S. Route 33 that already hosts a range of initiatives for connected roadway infrastructure.

    The planned system would see data from drones sent to the Ohio Department of Transportation’s Traffic Management Center, where it can be assessed and, if necessary, acted upon to keep traffic flowing. The ground-based cameras would continue to operate, and also be used to help build a broad picture of what’s happening on the road.

    The team, however, has plenty of prep work to be getting on with before it can launch its first drone over the highway. This includes building a safe and reliable platform that would allow the drones to be flown beyond the operator’s line of sight, which, in most cases, current regulations forbid.

    Ohio State professor and Aerospace Research Center director Jim Gregory promised the platform will be able to achieve its safety goals, saying, “Our collaborative work will pave the way for the ultimate vision of safe flight of unmanned aircraft systems throughout Ohio and beyond.”

    Although not part of the Ohio trial, drones could also be placed at multiple points along a highway, with each one hooked up to a power cord. This would enable them to fly around the clock, albeit from a fixed position. Such technology is already available and being used in a number of settings.

    Quadcopters can also be seen flying over the busy roads of Bordeaux, France, where police are using them to catch dodgy drivers. In the space of just a few months, the trial operation led to the handing out of hundreds of fines for traffic violations. Ohio’s research, on the other hand, appears to be aimed more toward spotting traffic jams, accidents, and other hazards rather than going after speedsters.

    Ohio town must pay back millions of fines collected from speed cameras, court rules
    By Andrew O'Reilly | Fox News
    http://www.foxnews.com/politics/201...collected-from-speed-cameras-court-rules.html

    "A small Ohio town that lived by the red light camera could soon die by it, after a federal court ruled the speed trap has to pay back more than $3 million in automated speeding tickets.

    The case of New Miami, population 2,321, highlights the controversy behind the tickets, which make stoplight-running motorists see red, but help keep the budgets of cities and towns in the black. New Miami will almost certainly go bankrupt if the Supreme Court doesn’t reverse a lower court’s ruling and spare it from refunding tens of thousands of tickets at $180 apiece plus interest.

    “The village enacted this unconstitutional scheme primarily as a money making venture,” Josh Engel, the lawyer representing the plaintiffs in the New Miami case, told Fox News. “They increased their spending significantly after the scheme was put in place and it was basically used to fill holes in their budget that would traditionally have come from raising taxes.”..."

    Ohio says the aerial drones won't be used to write tickets...

    Traffic monitoring drones proposed by Ohio officials
    Billy Kyle - Jun. 30th 2018 8:16 am ET
    https://dronedj.com/2018/06/30/traffic-drones-ohio/

    "... In Ohio, their goal isn’t to hand out more tickets to speeding drivers. It’s to get real-time data on traffic at a cheaper cost than using manned aircraft..."
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2018
    Fishon likes this.
  9. killkenny1

    killkenny1 Too weird to live, too rare to die.

    Reputations:
    7,558
    Messages:
    4,519
    Likes Received:
    8,902
    Trophy Points:
    581
    Looks like there is a new competitor for P3D and X-Plane 11 under development.

     
    hmscott likes this.
  10. killkenny1

    killkenny1 Too weird to live, too rare to die.

    Reputations:
    7,558
    Messages:
    4,519
    Likes Received:
    8,902
    Trophy Points:
    581
Loading...

Share This Page