Planes Thread

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Jarhead, Dec 29, 2015.

  1. HTWingNut

    HTWingNut Potato

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    So who's going to make you lunch?

    Brilliant!
     
  2. HTWingNut

    HTWingNut Potato

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  3. Support.2@XOTIC PC

    Support.2@XOTIC PC Company Representative

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    This is a Super Cub right? I've seen this sort of thing done with a Taylorcraft B but usually with a good headwind and an uphill slope (farm pilots are nuts BTW)
     
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  4. HTWingNut

    HTWingNut Potato

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    Yeah, in smaller aircraft, with a strong headwind, it's not too bad. I remember doing pattern work in a Cessna 172 with a strong direct headwind and would land in a couple hundred feet.
     
  5. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Where Are the Pilotless Airliners and Why Aren’t They Here Yet?
    https://thepointsguy.com/2017/08/where-are-the-pilotless-airplanes/

    "Peter Thiel, PayPal founder and tech evangelist, noted several years ago that “We wanted flying cars, but instead got 140 characters.” He was, of course, talking about Twitter, but his larger point was that the technological advancements that seemed to be inevitable have — when they’ve even shown up — been underwhelming.

    The pilotless airliner, like the driverless car, is one of those innovations that always seems to be around the next corner, but like a mirage in the desert, keeps receding into the distance.

    And it certainly isn’t for lack of effort. DARPA has recently been testing a robot which occupies the space where a co-pilot sits on an airliner. A recent headline proclaimed that this robot was able to fly (and land!) a 737. So that’s that right? We can finally get on with the business of halving (or eliminating) our pilot force, solving the pilot shortage and saving a ton of money to boot.

    Well, I wouldn’t be so quick to quit flight school and dust off that medical school application. We are still quite a ways away from single or no pilot airliners for a number of reasons. But first, I’d like to review where we’ve come from when it comes to cockpit automation and what we’ll ultimately be asking our machines to do."
     
  6. Jarhead

    Jarhead Feel My Heart

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    https://aviation.stackexchange.com/questions/1802/why-do-we-still-use-pilots-to-fly-airplanes
     
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  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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  8. HTWingNut

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    That video also linked to this one:

     
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  9. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    How One Man Rebuilt a WWII Spitfire Plane By Hand

    Martin Phillips' Spitfire last aircraft at Filton rebuilt by Aerial Museum's John Hart December 2012
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2017
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  10. Support.2@XOTIC PC

    Support.2@XOTIC PC Company Representative

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    While I'd put drones up against fighter pilots any day (even if they're not better pilots, they have none of the restrictions on g forces, visibility, and psychological stress that a human might) the returns diminish on airliners filled with people. There is no utility in being able to pull 30g in an airline, and unlike a drone fighter you can't consider the airframe expendable in the case of hardware/software failure since it's full of people. Also as a wild card there's the creativity factor. As prone to mistakes as a human can be, we also come up with crazy stuff sometimes that a machine might not think of.
     
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