Planes Thread

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Jarhead, Dec 29, 2015.

  1. Gabrielgvs

    Gabrielgvs Notebook Consultant

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    I stated above that I'm of the opinion United handled this very poorly and feel a better effort should have been made. I also feel that we need to recognize responsibility where it rests, including United, the law enforcement officers, and the passenger. Whether he agreed or disagreed when told to deboard, the passenger should have complied understanding that different rules apply on an aircraft. If there was some confusion on part as to that reality, it would have been abundantly clear when law enforcement (an arm of the state police in this case) gave the order. At this point in the incident, it is no longer just a matter of whether or not it was right or wrong for United to force him off. The fact that he decided to return to the plane indicates that there was something very wrong with his thought process. United may have handled this improperly, but the number of people holding the company responsible for the choices of the LE officer(s) and the passenger himself is silly, IMO. If it were me, I'm sure I would be incredibly upset but at the end of the day, we need to handle our emotions, make better choices, and refrain from making a bad situation worse by piling onto it.

    https://patch.com/illinois/chicago/...-united-passenger-didnt-have-right-stay-plane

     
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  2. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    When he was originally onboard and seated, when he was asked if he would give up his seat, he could have at that point declined to give up his seat.

    Once he voluntarily gave up his seat and left the plane, he didn't have the right to re-board that plane again without going through the seat assignment and on-boarding process.

    So the expert is correct about the 2nd time he was on the plane, but that doesn't apply to his original situation when asked if he would give up his seat, he wasn't compelled at that point to give up his seat, he could have simply declined to voluntarily give up his seat.

    The Airline should be required to tell people that they aren't required to give up their seats when asked, that it is completely voluntary, but if the Airline did that - spelled out the passenger's rights before asking - they might be hard pressed to get any volunteers.
     
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  3. Gabrielgvs

    Gabrielgvs Notebook Consultant

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    I am not familiar enough with the in's and out's to voice an opinion on that, but I will say that right or wrong, when you're on an aircraft and are ordered off, the only productive means of "righting" a potential "wrong" will be available elsewhere and after the fact.
     
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  4. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    I doubt that the Airline ordered that guy off the plane the first time, it sounds like he voluntarily gave up his seat, and then had second thoughts.

    He was confused by the situation and by the time he realized he made a mistake by giving up his seat, he compounded his mistake a couple of more times, getting back on the plane without boarding permission, getting back into the seat he vacated - it was no longer his, and by refusing to comply with the order to leave the plane on his 2nd time on the plane.

    The problem with this situation is that the Airline put him in this conundrum by not clearly notifying him he wasn't required to give up his seat the first time. They need to make sure that the passenger knows they aren't being compelled to give up their seat, and that it's completely voluntary and that they can decline without penalty.

    This isn't a case of this guy starting out being a bad guy, he was actually being a good guy giving up his seat - until he had second thoughts and giving his inexperience he quickly escalated the situation into him being the bad guy.

    In this kind of situation, he should have been offered a "do over" once he realized his mistake, and the Airline should not have pressed the situation into treating him as a criminal.

    A calmer take on the situation would have had him back on the plane in his original seat, and the next "randomly" selected passenger could have been asked to voluntarily give up their seat.

    It may have seemed to the Airline persons at that time that insisting he follow through on giving up his seat was the most expedient path to allowing the flight to depart, but it wasn't.
     
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  5. Jarhead

    Jarhead Perfectly Sane

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    This is why you *always* read the fine print on any contract you agree to. ;)
     
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  6. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    But, you read it as you are compelled to give up your seat when asked, and I read it as "Nope". ;)
     
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  7. Jarhead

    Jarhead Perfectly Sane

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    Hmm, fair enough. Whatever the answer is though, the wording is clearly visible to anyone wanting to buy a ticket ;).
     
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  8. Gabrielgvs

    Gabrielgvs Notebook Consultant

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    Without fully understanding protocol I would tend to agree completely.

    The airline should have, been the only party in the wrong here. You know, when my kids find themselves in "bad" situations as the result of circumstances beyond their control (#life), I usually tell them that they can either choose to make things better, or make them worse.
     
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  9. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Last edited: Apr 13, 2017
  10. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Last edited: Apr 13, 2017
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