P775TM1-G and I9 9900K high temperature problem!

Discussion in 'Sager and Clevo' started by lvka81, Oct 14, 2019.

  1. lvka81

    lvka81 Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hi guys,
    I write because I need some information for cooling my 9900K CPU in my Clevo P775TM1-G.
    Given that in many games it reaches 85/90 C° up to 98C°, I would like to do this:

    1) Delid with liquid pro;
    2) Replace the original IHS with another all in copper;
    3) Use the kryonaut thermal grizzly between IHS and cooling system.

    Do you think this is worth doing? The liquid pro ruin IHS in copper?
    Or am I not doing anything, but just using the kryonaut thermal grizzly?

    I await your advice

    Thanks
     
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  2. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

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    The stock IHS is nickel plated copper. It's also soldered on making it trickier to remove.
     
  3. lvka81

    lvka81 Notebook Enthusiast

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    So there's no need to do the delid?
     
  4. jc_denton

    jc_denton Notebook Evangelist

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    Some steps to try before going this route.

    Are you playing with fans at max, fn+1?
    Is your 9900k undervolted? Trying to push the undervolt further.
    Undervolting your graphics card can help if your p775 has the unified heatsink.

    Gamersnexus on 9900k delidding and liquid metal tests.
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2019
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  5. lvka81

    lvka81 Notebook Enthusiast

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    No, the fans are 20% more, but I think they go automatically at the most.
    The cpu is currently at 4700Mhz with udervolt -100mV. The gpu has the standard settings.
    The gpu of how much should I perform the undervolt?
     
  6. jc_denton

    jc_denton Notebook Evangelist

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    Try having the fans at max, by pressing fn+1 keys, and log the temperatures for games.

    At 4.7Ghz you could use a higher undervolt, if you have a decent chip, you will still be fine at -150mV or even more. You will want to test this to find where stability ends. Something like Cinebench R15 is a quick way to find the this.

    I'd recommend using max fans when doing this, and having hwinfo64 running in the background to monitor temps and if any WHEA errors appear.

    Undervolting the GPU depends on the card. MSI afterburner is a great tool for locking the voltage/frequency curve. @Mr. Fox has a great guide on how to do this for the 10 series cards. But the same principle goes for the 20 series.

    You might want to log a gaming session to have both CPU temp/mhz and GPU temp/mhz to give you an idea how cooling holds up.
     
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  7. lvka81

    lvka81 Notebook Enthusiast

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    Ok. thanks for the informations.
    Other information, I'm using IC diamond 24 carat, what do you suggest I change it with other thermal compound?
     
  8. jc_denton

    jc_denton Notebook Evangelist

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    If the temperatures are still unreasonably high after doing a more aggressive undervolt for the CPU and undervolting the GPU, you could repaste with Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut. It has a thermal conductivity of 12.5W/mK compared to IC Diamond 24's 4.5W/mK.

    Best scenario would be to have liquid metal between both die/ihs/heatsink, however there is more inherent risk with using liquid metal if you dont take precautions and prepare the system. And further problematic is that clevo heatsinks are not perfectly flat, thus having liquid metal would at times result in poor contact between components and worse thermal performance. Not to mention that LM will react with the copper heatsink and diffuse into it over time.
     
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  9. lvka81

    lvka81 Notebook Enthusiast

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    I saw your laptop in signature, what are your temperatures?
     
  10. jc_denton

    jc_denton Notebook Evangelist

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    There are many factors that are at play, type of load, ambient temp, fan speed, cpu silicone quality etc.

    And it's really not fair to compare the p870 and p775.
    They are both very different machines and great in their own respectable ways.
     
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