P775TM1 Build Help

Discussion in 'Sager and Clevo' started by _H_, Feb 13, 2020.

  1. jc_denton

    jc_denton BGA? What a shame.

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    Both 8700K and 9900K have a good strong IMC relative to what is achievable on the p7/p8 boards. But, as we always have to mention, it's very much up to the actual trace quality of the individual board. Currently, it's been possible to run 3700Mhz at the very top end, but most stability seems to begin to getting compromised around 3460Mhz.

    2666Mhz is Intel reference, but I've yet to see a single 8700k/9900k that was not able to go beyond that on a p7/p8 with decent memory. However, there are other systems, 51m for instance, that were gimped and locked out from running anything above reference.
     
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  2. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKs Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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    Dell’s gaming flagship hasn’t even Intel’s reference clock speed for ram. Capped at 2400MHz. Aka specs below what you can find from the cheapest Jokebooks with 8th and 9th gen Intel Core processors. It’s up to the notebook manufacturers add In Intel’s reference ram specs or top it with XMP support.
     
  3. _H_

    _H_ Notebook Enthusiast

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    What I've seen and gathered from other threads is that 3200Mhz is definitely doable and even if I chose to underclock to 3000Mhz (what the P775TM1 has listed as max) my timings are still going to be better than 2666 memory I've seen for the same price.

    Thanks for all your input!
     
  4. Clevobest

    Clevobest Notebook Enthusiast

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  5. _H_

    _H_ Notebook Enthusiast

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    This is a great example of "is it worth the money?" and i'm glad you posted it, but i won't solely be using the laptop for gaming. I will game on it quite a bit, however I do 3D modeling, Coding, Visual design, as well as a decent amount of 2D CAD. I have a feeling non gaming benchmarks will show slightly higher benefits since the GPU does most of the work with most games.
     
  6. Clevobest

    Clevobest Notebook Enthusiast

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    If you use CAD,coding and so,buy 2666 but 64gb or more if the laptop support that.
     
  7. _H_

    _H_ Notebook Enthusiast

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    Honestly if the price difference was there I would. But 32gb of 3200 was about $160 USD, 32gb of 2666 with comparable timings was about $140.

    20% increase in MAX transfer rate (25600 - 21300) for $20 USD feels like a reasonable budgeting decision.

    In the mean time I have 64gb of 2666 in my other laptop. I can take 32gb out and temporarily place put them in this laptop to do some benchmarks ( gaming and CAD). I will compare them once the ballistix come in!

    Also how nice is it that the ram is under the keyboard and the keyboard is removable!?! My MSI GT73VR was a pain in the butt to swap the top memory as the whole motherboard had to come out. That's the first laptop I haven't ended up with an extra screw or two and I used to work in computer repair.
     
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  8. jc_denton

    jc_denton BGA? What a shame.

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    Indeed, it's nice when designers thought about things like that.
     
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  9. _H_

    _H_ Notebook Enthusiast

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    I followed the link in your signature about your lapped 9900k. Was it worth the time involved and would you recommend others to do it?
     
  10. jc_denton

    jc_denton BGA? What a shame.

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    As you saw, it was a combination of a few mods to get it to that point. Where the 9900K would top out at 65c for 5Ghz Cinebench R15.
    (lapping the die, custom IHS, fixing the VRM thermalpads, LM, 3rd fan and fixing warping in my TM1 heatsink.)

    Lapping the die alone might drop anywhere from 5 to 10c, depending on how much you sand off. However, I wouldn't recommend lapping it as thin as mine. As by the second lapping, the 9900K was considerably thinner than a 8700K, which inevitably would be the end of it.

    Initially it was fine and ran frosty cold. Despite that, I had to disassemble the system several times to check up on some elements. And inadvertently stressing the already thin die, by frequently dismounting and remounting the heatsink and IHS. Last disasenembly I might have actually cracked the die, as the 9900K no longer booted and is now on it's way to USA for an autopsy.

    Having mentioned all that, I wouldn't recommend it for the average user. But, if you were to lap the die, I would suggest not sanding it down as much as me.
    Since a very thin die paired with a much thicker (4.37mm) IHS will put a lot of stress on the silicon.

    For my new 9900KF, I modified the ILM in order to mitigate the mounting pressure from the aforementioned. Since it's paired with the same BartX IHS, but has a non-lapped 9900KF die.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2020
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