P750TM1-G Questions

Discussion in 'Sager and Clevo' started by PaladinPC, Feb 15, 2018.

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  1. PaladinPC

    PaladinPC Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hi all,

    New to the forum; found it while looking for Clevo resellers in North America. After some searching, I'm considering picking up a P750TM1-G, most likely from HIDevolution given their good reputation and my interactions with Donald. I had a few concerns that I'm hoping current owners or those familiar with the model can help answer.

    1. What's the battery life like on these machines with the i7-8700K ? I understand this will range depending on whether the chip is OC'd, undervolted, delidded, paste, etc and what kind of graphics card is chosen. For HIDevolution pc owners, what are you guys seeing with the undervolted delidded 8700K?

    2. Should I go with the GTX1070 option, or stick with the default 1060? I'm not intending to game that much outside of Stardew Valley and possibly Monster Hunter World (when it comes out). I also already have a desktop (6700K, GTX 1070) at home if I need more gaming power. Also, given concern 1, I'm not sure if the 1070 would be bad from a batter life perspective. The most intensive workload that I would use the graphics card for is perhaps some protein modeling work or CUDA programming.

    The primary use for this laptop would be a mobile workstation. I'm currently a PhD student researching protein structure and design. As such, I am and will be using computational tools to model/design proteins and other biomacromolecules, as well as simulate their behavior with molecular dynamics.

    I need something portable with decent (~2 to 4) hours of battery life given that I will be moving a lot during the day from classes to lab and other facilities. I also need high-performance computing power that will let me be productive on the go. I tend to travel a lot to help my wife with her medical needs, so I don't want to be stuck on a desktop.
     
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  2. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK Living with Hope

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    It will be better for GPU that you go for Quadro: M1000M, M3000M, M4000M, M5000M, P3000, P4000 and P5000, depend on your budget, you can discuss with Mr. Donald what model can support them, those cards will be more efficient for your model/design activities.
    Good luck with your new purchase.
     
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  3. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK Living with Hope

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    I found this video for you,
    3D Modeling & Design – Do you REALLY need a Xeon and Quadro??

     
  4. Danishblunt

    Danishblunt Guest

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    Yeah no, completely drop the idea of the P750TM. It's meant to be a desktop replacement and not something you could carry around. Batterylife is garbage.

    You would probably rather look for something with a 7700HQ and a 1060 / 1060maxq.
     
  5. jaybee83

    jaybee83 Biotech-Doc

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    no need for a quadro whatsoever :) having done extensive protein modelling myself during my PhD, i know for a fact that gpu is less important than CPU and RAM in that regard. sounds to me like OP relies more on battery life than computational prowess, so i would recommend to go for a more battery friendly laptop (although my personal choice atm would also be a P751TM-G ;) )
     
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  6. slimmolG

    slimmolG Notebook Consultant

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    I can't speak directly about the P750 but I can make some informed comments here since I've been doing mol bio, synthetic bio, and evo-devo protein structural characterizations for quit a long time.

    1) The 8700K is a great choice since it has six cores, will come in quite handy for quick runs at anything such as NAMD/GROMACs, etc that partition the workload between the CPU and GPU. I wanted to stay with a 15" laptop, so the 8700K wasn't a real option and in reality, long sims require 12-20 core Xeons anyway, so I chose to let my laptop be a laptop.-- Plus, all that desktop power is going to get pretty hot sitting at starbucks
    Battery life shouldn't really factor into the equation if you're looking at a desktop replacement type of laptop.

    2) The Quadro cards are *way* too limiting in CUDA cores [for the equivalent price. Note you would need to buy the Quadro P5000 to match the 2,048 cores in the GTX 1070 even the Quadro 5000M only has 384 cores while the GTX 1070 has 2,048(edit)]. Go for the GTX 1070, since it's in the sweet spot for GPU computing. It has appreciably more cores and power than the 1060, and going for a 1080 doesn't get you that much more in real calc power, like day/ns computations (e.g. something in the range of 0.73 vs 0.78). The higher clocks and memory bandwidth of the 1080 are useful, but the performance/price ratio drops, and 1080 GPUs are harder to keep cool.

    You can check out a colleague's benchmarks here
    And an old stmv sim running on his old laptop (980M, ~1,500 cores)

    If you do any straight GPU-computations (e.g. AMBER, other CUDA specific), you will absolutely need a good GPU or be prepared to spend a good amount of your PhD waiting around to see if you set the run correctly (Even in this case the 1080 won't help you that much more). If you simply need to spend a bunch of time visualizing PDB files in Chimera/Pymol and making a complex bounce around a bit, you can do that on any old GPU with enough memory to hold your project. A million atom complex, no.

    Agree with @Danishblunt, the 7700HQ is perfectly fine, but stick with a 1070 instead of a 1050/1060, or you'll feel it later when you get good at what you do. If you decide you need to save/shuffle money around for other components like more RAM, sure, get the 1060. But don't do it to save battery life.

    Totally agree with @jaybee83, you (most likely) will need lots of RAM, shoot for 32 GB if possible. I feel a little shorted at 64 GB, but I don't see any 128 GB RAM laptops for sale. And 512 GB... lol.... I wouldn't mind having removable RAM sticks sporting out the top like shark fins :cool:

    3)
    The quote above indicates a bulky desktop replacement is not what you want, even if it's crammed in a 15" chassis. I'd advise a laptop like mine or similar, it has tons of power at 5.8 lbs vs 7.5 lbs or more
    :)
    (plus I gots a MUX switch for a little mo battery savings!)
    ;)
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2018
  7. sicily428

    sicily428 Donuts!! :)

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  8. PaladinPC

    PaladinPC Notebook Enthusiast

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    Thanks for all the feedback guys. I think all the suggestions steering me toward an actual laptop rather than a desktop replacement make a lot of sense (as they should). I also really appreciate all of the specific feedback from other academic peers, definitely wasn't expecting that :)
     
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  9. ThatOldGuy

    ThatOldGuy Notebook Virtuoso

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    You are comparing mismatched generations by 8 years

    The Quadro 5000M is a 2010 graphics card based on the GTX 480M... It has more CUDA cores than the GTX 480M too (32 to be exact). Performance was a bout on par.

    The current gen flagship mxm Quadro P5000 is the exact same card as the GTX 1070 with a little lower clock and "Productivity Software" enhanced drivers that excels in NX 10 and some other very specific modelling programs (it only has slight lead in most CAD/Solidworks based software)...

    Agree with the sentiment though. It is still way overpriced for individual use for Quadro high end. Still a better buy to get the GTX 1070 or 1080 and brute force applications without "optimized Drivers"
     
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  10. slimmolG

    slimmolG Notebook Consultant

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    Yeah it's been a bit since I looked into that, a quick web copy/paste wan't the best idea to highlight the point. I should have got the hint it was wrong when I didn't notice the expected 16-8 memory diff, thanks for the correction

    And certainly, like you state, the performance/price ratio of the Quadros are way worse than the 1070-->1080 upgrade
     
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