P34G v3 news

Discussion in 'Gigabyte and Aorus' started by olakiril, Oct 5, 2014.

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  1. 0utf0xZer0

    0utf0xZer0 Notebook Enthusiast

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    P34 is the model.
    W indicates the graphics chip it uses
    V3 indicates that it's the third generation of P34.

    The change from G to W occured because the third generation has a 970m while the previous generations used the 760m and 860m. Gigabyte uses W to indicate a notebook has a 70 series nvidia chip and G for a 60 series. And K is used for 65 series chips so of they make a 965m powered P34 to sell along the P34W v3, it'll be the P34K v3.

    There won't be a P34G v3 unless Gigabyte makes a version featuring a 960m (a chip that is rumoured but not announced IIRC). The only reason people talked about a P34G v3 prior to the official unveiling of the P34W v3 is because they didn't realize that the move from 860m to 970m would result in it being a P34W rather than a P34G.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2015
  2. LVNeptune

    LVNeptune Notebook Virtuoso

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    Makes sense now, thanks for the clarification!
     
  3. Pcguy07

    Pcguy07 Notebook Geek

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    Don't even tell him about the P34K v3 coming in February! Haha
     
  4. LVNeptune

    LVNeptune Notebook Virtuoso

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    Guessing that will be the 960M.
     
  5. Amal77

    Amal77 Notebook Deity

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    The upcoming 965M
     
  6. LVNeptune

    LVNeptune Notebook Virtuoso

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    I was close :p
     
  7. daza100

    daza100 Notebook Geek

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    I hope the 970m 3 vram is good enough to last 2 or more years I might buy the Aorus x3 v3 with 6GB vram depending on the price and I also don't like the sound of aorus build quality with the lid and keyboard flex
     
  8. LVNeptune

    LVNeptune Notebook Virtuoso

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    Plastic will always have some flex
     
  9. Hephaestos

    Hephaestos Notebook Guru

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    Flex is not necessary bad. Think about situations when excessive but realistic forces are applied to various sections of a notebook. "Excessive" means beyond design criteria, further:
    * "excessive realistic" means for example gently bending a screen lid with both hands, dropping an opened notebook from a table to carpeted floor, dropping a small book on a laptop,
    * "excessive unrealistic" means subjecting a notebook to scenarios well beyond what it can realistically be expected to encounter in normal use, for example a strong person twisting the screen with both hands, throwing a notebook from the window of office tower, doping a heavy bookshelf full of books on it.

    When a notebook is designed a mixture of materials is used (not only to save dollars). Engineering aims to provide good compromise between usability, quality as perceived by users and survivability in "excessive realistic" scenarios. It is always a price/weight (plus a few other factors) compromise. Back screen panel made of light metal (like aluminum) is typically perceived by users as more solid. But it is not necessary so: if "excessive realistic" test is applied, it could bend possibly a bit less, but it may also loose its original flat shape after the test. Not good. If the same lid is made from a properly selected plastic material it will also bend, but when the force is removed, it is more likely to "pop back" to its original shape. Good, this is what we want, no permanent shape change.

    What some people refer to as "plastic" is very, very wide range of very, very different materials with different specific names. There are right and wrong "plastics" for a specific application. NEVER judge quality of a design by simplifying: "plastic bad, metal good". F1 racing cars, space shuttle, military jets, passenger planes also use many non-metal (AKA "plastic") components, yes, they are often structural, load bearing or stress loaded parts. It is a mixture of different materials in proper places which make a good design.

    BTW: if you worry about "flex" next time when you fly look at aircraft wing flexing, "flopping". Boeing 747 destructive deflection at the tip (in "excessive unrealistic" test) is, depending on a model, around 30-36 feet. Expect to see considerably less during standard flight - but well above zero!
    [disclosure: yes, I used to design equipment (but not laptops)]
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2015
  10. 0utf0xZer0

    0utf0xZer0 Notebook Enthusiast

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    Are there any good ways to evaluate how resistant a design is to damage?

    The one I've generally used is to try applying moderate pressure to the middle of the screen cover. Generally, one of three things will occur:
    1) I can see distortion on the LCD where I press
    2) I can feel the screen bend, but can't see any distortions
    3) The cover barely bends or doesn't bend at all

    My second laptop (Dell Inspiron 1501) and third laptop (Thinkpad X120e) don't really bends at all in this test and have had not durability problems. My first laptop (Seanix SL955 I think - it was a house branded version of a Uniwill design IIRC) would show distortions if pressure was applied to the back of the screen. It developed a cracked LCD panel within 14 months, and I can't figure out why as I don't recall having any accidents with it and the exterior housing around the LCD was undamaged. About the only thing I can think of is that I or someone else may have ended leaned against the backpack it was in while on the train - the trains I ride can be pretty crowded during rush hour.

    One of the laptops I'm considering getting is the MS GS60, has no distortions but does flex when I flex on it. Scares me a bit because it's a $1900 laptop, way more than I've ever spent in the past. I have no idea what the P34G is like, I'd love to try one but Gigabyte has almost no retail presence in Canada and hence I can't find a demo.
     
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