P170EM & 1070 MXM - install, mods, nvidia inf mod (with photo)

Discussion in 'Sager and Clevo' started by origin17em, Apr 24, 2020.

  1. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

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    If you can hold around 4Ghz then anything not needing more than 4 cores should run well.
     
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  2. andrewff2

    andrewff2 Notebook Evangelist

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    ohhh thanks for the info man :D
     
  3. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

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    That's around the level you are looking at really at gaming loads.



    Might be of interest.
     
  4. bennyg

    bennyg Notebook Virtuoso

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    1st question, do you have prema system bios. That may fix a current limit issue. I have never seen a current limit in my p170em with prema even when I boiled a 3920xm ES in it for a short time doing some benching at 4.2-4.3ghz.

    I don't know specifically about the P170EM but I do get a current limit issue on the P370EM that drops the CPU to 1.2ghz when wall draw exceeds 540W - it is a motherboard/platform limit of some sort. If I set the power limit for the GPUs above 170W and load everything up it occurs. Set the power limits to 170W it never happens. This is not an adapter issue - as two 330W will handle over 600W wall draw with the P870DM3 (9900K + over-powered GTX1080s). The Deltas are usually fine with 300W, they do get hot if buried somewhere without some airflow to dissipate the waste heat, and they are reported by others to handle spikes up to 400W (not tested that myself)
     
  5. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

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    The motherboard itself only has certain power limits after all.
     
  6. Ryan Russ

    Ryan Russ Notebook Consultant

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    So I see quite a few issues here in regards to the GPU heatsink in general. When I personally ran the same card in my p157sm-a I did a mod much like yours, and here are the issues i see;
    1. The added heatpipes do nothing except keep heat circulating within the pipes. Since they are stacked, there is a failure in the way that these heatpipes transfer heat. If the bottom rung of the heatpipes heat too quickly, by the time that the thermal transfer hits the top heat pipes, there is already heat from the first layer saturating the heatsink. This causes a vicious cycle of delayed response to heat and essentially the top heatpipes do nothing to aid the reduction of heat
    2. The die cooling itself is negatively affected by the addition of the shim with solder. The shim itself can be a good idea, but unless it is attached with a high-thermal conductivity metal like silver or copper, or even indium, you are creating a thermal choke. If you used silver bearing solder, at the best case, there would be roughly 70~w/mk transfer, but likely less due to an imperfect mating between the shim and the heatplate.
    [​IMG]

    3. There is nowhere for the heat from the second pipes to go to. since there is already a layer of heatpipes secured to the heatsink, the thermal transfer is compromised as there is simply no way for the second layer of heatpipes to transfer heat to.
    4. The solder on the heatsink for the second layer of heatpipes looks more of an issue than anything else. The heatpipes are distorted and evidently not smooth like they were from the manufacturer. where these heatpipes connect look less like a layer of reasonable mating and instead a deeply imperfect adhesion to the heatsink.

    If you are serious about these mods, i would recommend doing what i did (although i lost my p157sm-A and the pictures of the mod i made) and create your own heatplate that is thicker than the current one to increase thermal mass, allowing you to have a solid block without a heat-choke. Increased thermal mass is important, and a proper channeling system from the plate to the heatpipe is crucial. Then, instead of using any regular solder, use a scientific SnAg 96.5/3.5 alloy. if you need increased thermal transfer, go with some of these heatpipes from digikey.
    https://www.digikey.com/product-det...-inc/ATS-HP-F9L250S70W-015/ATS2155-ND/5049698

    Just these two items (increasing the size of the heatplate, and replacing the actual heatpipes) will be enough to see you down to about 40-60c.
     
  7. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

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    Stacked on the core side is fine if you layered the heatsink end as being top and bottom of the fin stack.
     
  8. Ryan Russ

    Ryan Russ Notebook Consultant

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    It Would be fine if the stack on the core side had somewhere to dissipate heat on the fin side. since it looks like there are no fins interleaved with the old heatsink, the stack has nowhere to put its heat besides back into the heatplate for the core side.
     
  9. cvtlms

    cvtlms Notebook Enthusiast

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