Overheating mSATA SSD

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by LanceAvion, Jun 18, 2015.

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  1. LanceAvion

    LanceAvion Notebook Deity

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    Hey guys, has anyone else experienced a similar problem? I just stared using a new 850 EVO 1TB mSATA SSD and I noticed it's temperatures are wayyy too high. Even idling it stays north of 50C and it's even creeped into the 60s during normal use.

    I've tried the various techniques such as those presented here:
    http://www.abxzone.com/forums/showthread.php?t=120968
    and here:
    http://forum.crucial.com/t5/Crucial-SSDs/m500-msata-high-temperatures-70C/td-p/152140

    Screenshot.png
    Screenshot 2.png

    Is there anything else I can do to lower my temperatures, or am I out of luck and just got a defective drive?
     
  2. pete962

    pete962 Notebook Evangelist

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    It's all about airflow, or lack of it inside. When my 850 EVO hits 50c and it will do so even siting idle, I ramp up CPU fan to max and that cools it off. If you want to keep it cool, get laptop cooling pad, just make sure fan blows air inside close to where msata drive is . I'm planning on permanent fix, I just need to find fan small enough to fit inside, even little air moving around will keep it cool. And no, I don't think your drive is defective.
     
  3. Tinderbox (UK)

    Tinderbox (UK) BAKED BEAN KING

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  4. ajkula66

    ajkula66 Courage and Consequence

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    A very valid question indeed, for several reasons.

    While SSD is not going to melt at 50-something degrees, I'd be willing to bet it will start throttling and that data throughput will suffer. That's the reason for having a temp sensor in the first place, regardless of BS that manufacturers might throw upon us.
     
  5. Tinderbox (UK)

    Tinderbox (UK) BAKED BEAN KING

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  6. John Ratsey

    John Ratsey Moderately inquisitive Super Moderator

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    I consider an SSD idle temperature in the 50's C to be quite reasonable and it won't go lower unless it is located where there is cooling airflow or has a thermal pad to conduct heat to the notebook casing. The SSD idle temperature largely depends on proximity to heat-generating components (particularly CPU / GPU) but also the fan operating rules. You can use the Sensors tab in HWiNFO to monitor the temperatures of the key components in your system and, possibly, the fan speed to improve your understanding of the factors affecting the SSD temperature. It could be informative to see the maximum temperatures when you run an SSD performance benchmark. Do they approach / exceed 70C?

    John
     
  7. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    Idle temp's at 50C? That is defective to me, whether it is within 'design specs' or not. More Samsung junk... now new and improved with 3D heating tech...

    Anything that heats up a platform without an increase in performance is not a contender for my systems (which is one reason why discrete GPU's are worthless to me for most of my workstations mobile and desktops).

    If the indicated temp is 50C+ at idle then the controller is obviously throttling (throttling starts at anything over 30C with an SSD controller). I would at least try another example before writing it off completely.

    Btw, are you using Win7 or Vista? You might want to try a newer O/S too.
     
  8. John Ratsey

    John Ratsey Moderately inquisitive Super Moderator

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    First we need to find out the ambient temperature inside the computer at the SSD location. That could easily be over 50C in a notebook where the fan rules are designed to keep noise to the minimum and the SSD is near the CPU. The SSD won't be cooler than the temperature of its surroundings. The 840 EVO mSATA SSD in my Dell E7440 idles at around 40C while the CPU idles at around 50C. However, the SSD's location is on the opposite side of the notebook from the CPU.

    Nor do I believe that throttling will onset as low as 30C. If the design maximum SSD temperature is 70C then 60C or 65C are more plausible thresholds.

    John
     
  9. LanceAvion

    LanceAvion Notebook Deity

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    Hey everyone, thanks for the responses. To help you help me I'd like to give you all some more information.

    First of all my laptop is a Lenovo Ideapad y400, pictured to the left. Below is a full disassembly video for my laptop. At around 1:09 you can see the position of the mSATA slot. It's in the bottom right of the notebook (looking at it from the view point), to the right of the RAM slots and below the fan/copper heatsink.



    With that out of the way, I decided to run CrystalDiskMark and see how far I could raise the temperatures. The first time I ran it, the drive started at 62C and climbed to 70C. Immediately after that, I reset HWMonitor and ran CrystalDiskMark once more. This let me see what the maximum CPU and GPU temperatures were during the benchmark, and raised the mSATA's temperature even further, to 74C.

    Below I've colour coded the results.
    • The maximum temperature of my CPU was 63C in the package and one core. It's circled in purple.
    • The maximum temperatures of my GPUs were 43C and 46C respectively. They are circled in green.
    • The maximum temperature of my HDD was 37C. It is circled in yellow.
    • The maximum temperature of my mSATA in question was 74C. It is circled in red.
    Somehow the drive wasn't throttled even at that temperature, but it is no doubt bad for it's longevity. When I took the screenshot, roughly 20 minutes or so after the benchmarking, the drive's temperature dropped to 59C. That's still far too hot for comfort. As with the maximum temperatures, the minimums from 20 or so minutes later are recorded in the screenshot.

    Also regarding how long it stays at 50C+, that's it's constant idling temperature. The drive can be as low as 29C immediately after booting, but it immediately begins its climb to 50C+ and only takes a few minutes to get there. Blasting the fans doesn't help much, as the video shows they are not positioned to move any air around the mSATA.

    Screenshot.png
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2015
  10. ajkula66

    ajkula66 Courage and Consequence

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    My take would be to forget about mSATA altogether and just go for a full-size SSD in the main bay.
     
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