Overclocking the Aorus X9 DT V8 w/ i9-8950HK TO THE MAX!

Discussion in 'Gigabyte and Aorus' started by GizmoSlip, Jul 2, 2018.

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  1. GizmoSlip

    GizmoSlip Notebook Deity

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    The i9-8950HK is the highest end processor from intel. If you saw LinusTechTips video, he overclocked this same processor to 5 ghz in an Asus laptop… and he did it using blowiematrons to help keep it cool… And the laptop managed to score a 1560 Cinebench R15 score, which was impressive.

    But did the laptop really hit 5 ghz? Because a true 5.0 ghz OC on a i7-8700K should have managed closer to 1650. That tells us the processor was throwing errors, probably because it wasn’t getting enough power. It may not have thermally throttled, but it was not remaining stable. I'm not expert to this level of fully understand this just yet. I'll let some of the veteran overclockers chime in on this if they can. On top of that, it was a completely unrealistic test for day to day realistic use. No one is going to duct tape blowiematrons to their laptop on a day to day basis… So what is the i9-8950HK really capable of on a day to day basis overclock? That’s what I wanted to find out!

    Now I’ve got it in this Aorus X9 laptop, and this laptop has been upgraded with Liquid Metal and thermal pads to help keep it as cool as possible.

    Right off the bat, the processor comes OC’d to 4.3 ghz out of the box with a 75 mlv undervolt, but the problem it has is that the power limits are not high enough to steadily maintain 4.3 ghz on a consistent basis. The processor just needs more juice to maintain those clocks. So I started off by raising the short and long power limits to 150w, though it will never use that much anyway.

    With the power limits raised, it was able to maintain 4.3 ghz no problem. So I started upping the clock speeds. It wasn’t long before I ran into thermal throttling, so to help the processor run cooler, I increased the default undervolt to -140 mv, and the thermal throttling went away. I was able to increase the clocks up to 4.5 ghz no problem.

    But when I went to 4.6 ghz, I started running into current limit throttling, causing the cores to be unstable and fluctuate up and down. I believe this is because Aorus has limited the total amount of power through put in the bios to about 105w. So that means that if you want to increase the clock speed further, you have to keep increasing the power efficiency, which means increasing the undervolt.

    At -160 mv, things became stable once more at 4.6 ghz. So I tried going for 4.7 ghz, and it wasn’t stable again. So I increased the undervolt to -180 mv, and things became stable once more.

    At 4.7 ghz, we were riding the firmware’s current limit and thermal limits.

    I tried getting it to clock to 4.8 ghz, but Aorus seems to have locked the bios so not go above 4.7 clock speeds, so they won’t clock to that speed regardless of load on the CPU. On top of that, we were already riding the thermal limits at 4.7 ghz. It was only not thermally throttling because of our hefty undervolt, so when under a full load of Cinebench R15. In day to day use, it just isn’t going to be stable above 4.7 ghz anyway.

    I was able to run Cinebench in a loop just fine and average right around the 1520 mark or so at 4.7 ghz, which is absolutely phenomenal. I was also able to run PUBG and saw a 10 FPS increase by overclocking from 4.3 ghz to 4.7.

    But here’s the thing. When undervolted to -180, I ran into stability issues when the processor was running idle and the computer would randomly shut down when it wasn’t doing anything, so that’s no good. It also didn’t like some games like Far Cry 5, and it would run into throttling issues.

    I also tried seeing if I could run my Premiere Pro render test, but I found that 4.7 ghz became thermally throttled fairly quickly. So in my opinion, 4.7 ghz is just too much to ask from this processor.

    The sweet spot I found for this particular i9-8950HK chip was 4.5 ghz and a -160 mv undervolt. This was the point at which throttling didn’t occur for the games and video rendering that I used it for.

    The most impressive thing about this chip is that it acts not like a typical laptop processor, where it becomes power limited severely to the point of crippling potential performance. This thing was able to handle a 105w TDP on a continuous basis and not become thermally throttled. That’s a 130% power throughput increase over base TDP. And that is really impressive.

    But ultimately, this means that the i9-8950HK processor does still fall behind significantly when compared to the i7-8700k or i7-8086k chip that you can get in a Clevo P750 or P870 chassis. If you buy these laptops from HIDEvolution, it is going to be possible to undervolt and overclock those processor to hit at least 4.7 ghz on a consistent basis. While the i9-8950HK does barely beat out the Ryzen 7 1700 in the Asus GL702ZC, you can almost buy 3 of the Asus laptops for the price of this single Aorus X9.

    Overall, the i9-8950HK is a very impressive processing chip, but at the end of the day, if you want the ultimate CPU performance, you’re better off getting a desktop i7-8700k or Ryzen processor in a laptop.

    The main draw to the i9 is that it can fit in much thinner laptops, and the processor will outperform similar laptop CPUs, but in a thinner laptop, whatever processor you have will be limited by the amount of cooling such a thin chassis can provide, so you likely won’t improve performance much at all by upgrading the processor.Ultimately, a thicker laptop can still provide more power because of the additional cooling.

    So when it comes down to whether or not I can recommend the i9-8950HK and Aorus X9, I would only recommend it to people who have the budget, who want the best possible performance regardless of price, and are severely turned off by the idea of buying a thicker laptop with a desktop CPU. The Aorus X9 manages to outperform all other laptops that are in a similar thickness category, but it still can’t match the highest performance of full desktop CPUs, though it does get very close. It is an interesting balancing act the Aorus X9, but its a hard sell when its so much more expensive than other laptops with more power and thicker chassis. What are your thoughts?

    I've finally released a review of the Aorus X9. You can check it out here:
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2018
  2. undervolter0x0309

    undervolter0x0309 Notebook Consultant

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    Thanks for sharing! I lust over those Cinebench r15 scores :).

    Maybe windows is trying to reduce processor speed when no activity is happening. Have you tried switching to non-balanced power mode?

    I'm thinking of waiting for the Ryzen 2700 laptop (Helios 500 and hopefully Asus). I do like the aesthetics of the Aorus though :)
     
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  3. GizmoSlip

    GizmoSlip Notebook Deity

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    It's a very nice machine overall! I am just reviewing this unit for now, but I would love to own a similar machine potentially when the new GPUs hit probably later this year. Helios 500 is attractive, but not for me because its GPU is not going to be nearly powerful enough to run FPS at a competitive level in PUBG, but obviously, it would be great in the majority of games out there though! But I'm a big PUBG fan.
     
  4. lextheimpaler

    lextheimpaler Notebook Enthusiast

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    Any guide on how to repaste and add the thermal pads?
     
  5. GizmoSlip

    GizmoSlip Notebook Deity

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    That was done by a 3rd party re seller that didn't want to be named. I wasn't the one who did the upgrade.

    I just released a review on the Aorus X9. Check it out here if you wish:
     
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  6. iujona

    iujona Notebook Enthusiast

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    Nice review and subbed. HIDevolution I guess....I saw another reviewer, Western Gents doing a review on LM and he said its not worth using LM Conductanaut since TG Kryonaut is only around 2c higher in temps, however I would like to try LM for the Aorus.
     
  7. knibbler

    knibbler Notebook Evangelist

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    Pretty sure we're talking about other thicker laptops that still use 8950hk when you say "other more powerful laptops" Those laptops are close to the same price as the X9 DT. GT75, Alienware R5 and the Asus variant.

    So you still need an 8950HK... ( At about the same price) But to squeeze a tiny bit of overclocking room you get a fat chasis.

    The Clevo 8700k are also as or often more expensive.
    Just putting this in a different perspective.

    ..the 8850h is power locked so it wont compete
     
  8. GizmoSlip

    GizmoSlip Notebook Deity

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    I just reviewed Aorus x7 DT v8 with the 8850h, and it's not power locked. Runs 101 watts of power for continuous 4.3 GHz on all six cores. Only gets to 85 degrees too. Very impressive.

     
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  9. knibbler

    knibbler Notebook Evangelist

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    So whats the difference then? What does the 8950hk offer that the 8850h can't do?

    Or is it a case where Aorus removed the power limit when other manufacturers dont.
     
  10. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOK's Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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    Can you explain the Crippled Cinebench R15 score with 4.4GHz?
    Skjermbilde (1851).png

    Edit. From one of my older test with BGA clocks. 41x all cores. But with equal Cinebench R15 score as the 4.4GHz overclock showed above.
    upload_2018-7-31_3-35-35.png

    And with what clockspeed was used for 3DM Fire Strike? The Physics score is equal or even below what you get from lowe clocked i7-8750H in Asus Zephyrus M GM501. Aka 3.9GHz all 6 cores. The physics score don't look like fish or bird.
    Skjermbilde (1852).png
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2018
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