overclocking GTX 470m

Discussion in 'Sager and Clevo' started by ChronoBodi, Dec 18, 2010.

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  1. ChronoBodi

    ChronoBodi Notebook Consultant

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    hey, how much of an OC can i get on this card in my np 8690-s1?

    it's stock now, but i heard it can be beastly when overclocked...

    question is, what numbers has anyone have overclocked it to?
     
  2. Kevin

    Kevin Egregious

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  3. JohnnyFlash

    JohnnyFlash Notebook Virtuoso

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    Overclocking is the same for any card, it really doesn't matter what others have done. Start with either the GPU or the memory, use 10-20MHz increments, test it with OCCT. If it passes, bump it again.
     
  4. Soviet Sunrise

    Soviet Sunrise Notebook Prophet

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    The thing about the GTX 470M is that the memory is already clocked to the max rated speed of the chips themselves, as inscribed on the chips, at 1250MHz (625MHz up/down). I wouldn't push it past 650MHz as your primary/daily clocks, which is a 4% gain over factory, as you will encounter problems in the long run like a few of the fellow naive souls that have had their GPU's die on them because of overclock abuse. Though like I said before, the number one killer is still heat, so just keep your temps low and your memory within 650MHz.

    You can crank your core/shader clocks until they become unstable or heat becomes too high. Again just watch your temps. In my book, I lock the core/shader ratio.

    You should be able to touch 585/1170/650 on factory voltage. If not, just overvolt the sucker.
     
  5. Iccup

    Iccup Notebook Enthusiast

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    Soviet, thanks for the advice. But I am new to this so I am a little confused. When you say keep memory clock at 650, but when I open GPU-Z and it already shows my memory at 750. You mean it could go to 650x2 = 1300?

    My clocks are currently: GPU: 535, Memory: 750, Shader: 1070

    Tech17 in the benchmark forum has his at: 650/1500/1300 and 687/1700/1375.

    You are suggesting 585/1170/650.

    I am really confused to which is which... I seem to remember from somewhere that shader should be 2x the gpu clock... Can someone help this noob out?
     
  6. Soviet Sunrise

    Soviet Sunrise Notebook Prophet

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    I stand corrected. I divided twice too many times in my calculations under the influence of good liquor and sleep deprivation from post-finals partying. The max memory rating for the GTX 470M stands at 1250MHz, the same as the MR 5870. The factory clock for the memory on the GTX 470M is at 750MHz, but Tech17 took the memory to 1375MHz, 10% over the rated max. The chips clearly have 04 written on them denoting 0.4ns, or 2500MHz (1250MHz up/down). That's where I divided too many times in my previous post. It's stupid of me since Samsung (or any other company for that matter) doesn't produce GDDR5 modules with a max rating as low as 625MHz. http://www.samsung.com/global/system/business/semiconductor/family/2007/7/2/963584Graphics_code.pdf

    Memory bandwidth is very predictable and is simple to calculate. http://forum.notebookreview.com/6023663-post370.html

    If Tech17 was able to clock his GTX 470M core/shader to those levels, then follow his lead. They are safe since he hasn't overvolted yet. But 687/1700/1375 is a really strong overclock already. If I were him, I wouldn't clock the memory no more than 5% past 1250MHz. Better yet, don't exceed 1250MHz as that much memory bandwidth isn't needed outside of benchmarks. This will leave more headroom for cranking the core/shader, which will yield you more FPS. Again, as I've said before, just keep the temps low.

    If someone can provide a high quality macro shot of the card, I can properly find out the voltage limit for the core MOSFET's, or better yet the schema for the GTX 470M's circuit layout. The highest voltage in the voltage table is not the true max.

    For GF1xx cards, the reference ratio for the core/shader is the shader being twice the core, as opposed to the G92 which was at 2.5.
     
  7. Iccup

    Iccup Notebook Enthusiast

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    Thanks soviet! I will start with core: 585/memory: 1250/Shader:1170
     
  8. Lickwidpain

    Lickwidpain Notebook Consultant

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    Correct me if I'm wrong as I am still green when it comes to OCing. Singly are saying that OCing the memory can damage the GPU even at stock voltage?
     
  9. Soviet Sunrise

    Soviet Sunrise Notebook Prophet

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    The accessible voltage on the card only controls the Vcore for the die. It does not adjust memory voltage. GDDR5 is fixed at 1.5V VDD and VDDQ, 1.3V at rest.

    Excessive memory overclocking beyond what the chips are designed to handle will damage them. If you don't control your temps, or if you overclock beyond 5% past the rated max, or both, will you see damages in the long run. Not replacing your thermal pads if you frequently remove your GPU heatsink also contributes to damage as I have hammered so many times in the past.
     
  10. Blacky

    Blacky Notebook Prophet

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    You should also know that in general the video memory is much more prone to damage than the core. Most video cards fail because their GDDR fails not their core, that's why it's best take good care of your GDDR memory.

    Also the core has some safe-guards which prevent it from overheating which the GDDR doesn't, plus you never know how hot it gets.

    @Soviet Sunrise - Thanx for the info. I'll add the 470M memory to the GDDR memory thread. I find it strange that Clevo decided to run it's GDDR5 at 750Mhz, way below official specifications.
     
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