Okay so I need some kind of direction

Discussion in 'Motorized Vehicles' started by Tsunade_Hime, Aug 7, 2013.

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  1. Tsunade_Hime

    Tsunade_Hime such bacon. wow

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    Honestly I don't have an issue with another Integra, it's just hard finding sedan ones vs coupe. I would honestly like a larger car, hard putting a girlfriend, a kid, yourself and groceries into a small car. But what I like is how agile the Integra is and how good it was on fuel (if I really skimped, I could do a month of driving on 40 dollars).

    I never thought about electronics that break, is that a known issue with the Legend and the I30 or just the nature? I had a 1995 Nissan 240SX with like 200k+ miles, and everything worked (power steering, windows, AC, locks, radio). I was looking at old school RL/TL, they look really nice for all the gadgets and stuff offered for a mid 90's luxury car.
     
  2. MAA83

    MAA83 Notebook Evangelist

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    Nothing specific to those vehicles, just a generalization I guess, things like power window/door lock and sunroof and side view mirror actuators, power seat motors, "premium package" CD changer decks, auto-dimming rear view mirrors, I've had things like that go out on higher mileage luxury cars that came preloaded with that kind of stuff. It's not detrimental to the cars operation, but they're often costly to fix (in terms of parts prices) and so I ended up leaving them broke. Maybe it's an old fashioned rule, but generally I try to stay away from cars with all those electronics standard-equipped aside from windows and door locks when I'm buying or helping someone look for a 100k+ mileage car.

    I understand about the integra, it's rare to see the sedans on the streets anymore, lots of 2 doors. But with a girlfriend + baby + stuff I can see how that can get old real fast. A mid size would definitely fit your needs better I think. Or a hatch maybe.

    And those are the same reasons I kept my 02 civic even after buying other car(s). It can get by on 80 bucks of gas a month if I use it full time, and with suspension upgrades and basic bolt ons for the engine and driveline it's like flinging a peppy go cart around! Love it.
     
  3. ajkula66

    ajkula66 Courage and Consequence

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    At the given price range, there is no such thing as "reliability" when it comes to an old BMW. I can very well picture a pissed-off girlfriend, crying child and perishables melting in the trunk while you're trying to figure out why the darn thing just quit all of a sudden three miles south of Middle Of Nowhere. One word of advice: don't.

    My first pick, for $1500 or thereabouts, would be a Ford Taurus. They're plentiful, and you could possibly scope out one in good nick for the said amount.

    My choice from the list above would be Accord, although I'd definitely be looking for one with a manual trans...

    Happy hunting.
     
  4. Qing Dao

    Qing Dao LORD OF THE UNDERWORLD

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    Well that is just because you are used to one type of car, so anything different will seem as stupid and bad. Admittedly, my experience working on Japanese cars is limited to not much more than regular maintenance on a WRX and MR2 Spyder, But I have experience doing work on all sorts of German and American cars, as well as Hyundais. I would probably rate Audi as the worst to work on. BMW's all have longitudinal engines and most have rear wheel drive. This makes it very easy to work on as everything is spread out and there is lots of space around everything. Again, just because some things may be different doesn't make them bad.

    German, American, and Japanese cars all have different kinds of sockets they like to use. If having to buy a set of the star sockets for $15 bothers you, think about how you need completely different sets of everything if you want to properly work on an American car.

    As for prices of parts, for basic maintenance things like oil, filters, spark plugs, brake pads and rotors, belts, hoses, and other knick-knacks seem similar regardless of the make of the car. The same for parts you can get from OEM's or 3rd parties. For rare parts where the only source is the car manufacturer, prices can be all over the place, but usually the most expensive parts to replace are the ones that will normally never go bad during the life of the car, but sometimes may. Remanufactured components seem to go for a pretty penny regardless of the make of the car.

    You are right, $1500 BMW's are really old and really beat up.

    It sounds like you should just grab whatever you can find. I'm not sure where you live, but if you don't have lots of time to wait around or aren't willing to travel long distances, finding the exact car you want at the bottom-end price you want to pay might be a bit of a stretch.
     
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