Official Sony VAIO F Series i5/i7 owners thread *Part 3*

Discussion in 'VAIO / Sony Owners' Lounge Forum' started by eagle17, Jan 7, 2010.

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  1. ab256

    ab256 Newbie

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    Here's a little colour profile round-up that I've found going through the thread (thanks to Joe Bleau): Vaio F Series Monitor Calibration and Users Created Profiles Roundup

    It mainly covers F11 series' though I'm going to try the VPCF11 Euro Premium matte 1080p profiles on my F12X when I get hold of it this week. I'm not sure what the results will be since results vary within the same model numbers and this would be between generations... Please could someone give feedback if you have tried this already?

    There seem to be some dedicated F12 profiles in the works, but as Joe Bleau suggests: "...buy a colorimeter to get the best of your F viewing experience, you can also use it on other computers & charge your friends some $ or drinks to recoup the investment" - I will probably end up buying a Spyder3Elite and doing exactly that after uploading a profile (for an EU premium matte F12X) here :-D
     
  2. Jacol

    Jacol Notebook Consultant

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    Thank you very very much! That is what Ive been looking for!
     
  3. philm94

    philm94 Notebook Geek

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    OK,

    So I've done some more testing, and I would like to retract my statement that the Realtek audio produces a 16khz low-pass filter effect; it seems, for all my technical analysis, I had a wire slightly earthing :rolleyes:

    But, I tested again, and came with some different, verified, results (NEW! With added screenshots!)

    The mic port is, unfortunately, a mic port.

    The classic test of a soundcard's input is to see if the port auto-gains when the input is low. This is very useful on a microphone - if you move a few inches away, you can surprisingly half (or worse) the sound pressure and ergo amplitude on a basic mic, so this feature helps to flatten what would otherwise be a very distracting sound characteristic.

    I tested this on the Vaio F to see if the amplitude response varied, based on the level of input it received. This was tested at 44 & 96Khz 'studio quality' to the same effect. The image below is from the latter.

    First, I calibrated a constant tone which was around 98% peak amplitude. This is around the level most CD's are (controversially) mastered at; and so is a typical input from a 'line in.'

    I then paused the tone and started recording. After a moment, I played the sound, then stopped again. The results are here :

    [​IMG]

    Point A is where the port is just recording silence (the soundcard is rated at -105bD, so this is the baseline noise profile here).

    Already, you can see it is boosting the sound very, very significantly.

    Point B is the sound being played. No problem here, the tone is captured properly and zooming in shows that it is not clipping. If you look closely at the start, you can see the card is capturing too much sound, and has to ramp it down. It is most visible by looking at the lighter blue inset, or the bottom of the block.

    Point C is where the card / port gives up it's secret. Recording the exact same blank silence as before, the card is now picking up less noise; it has attenuated for the differences in sound amplitude.

    Point D, and it's back to super boost. This would be a startling amount of noise on a line-in port.

    I did some further tests on the audio capture, to see how suitable it would be for music.

    The following is a FFT analysis of the card recording a blank input:

    [​IMG]

    It's baseline noise level is a quite poor -75dB , no surprise as it is ramping the gain.

    Notice, however, the area on the left of the graph. Below 6khz the card seems to be amping the sound even more, leading to more noise in transmission. Why isn't this surprising? Because 6khz is seen as the higher end of the human voice range (speaking, not singing); it is boosting sensitivity in the range of human speech. If you record music like this, you will have one hell of a time getting the EQ settings right to balance it out. The most likely scenario is that bass sounds are clipped, leading to low frequency distortion. This is often known as the 'speaker killer' sample :( There are also noise spikes all over the place.

    One thing you are looking for in a recording solution is a level response curve. To test this more thoroughly, I generated a white noise sample from 20hz to 22050khz, and recorded the result. The following was an FFT based on 4.3 million samples:

    [​IMG]

    Even when playing the sound the mic port is still boosting the lower frequencies, there is no doubt this is operating on a 'boost voice' profile, which is likely hardware / firmware encoded. There is also a noticeable trail off above 19khz when the recording profile is set to 44.1khz ... it should, mathematically, be fine until 22.05khz. It seems to be applying a low-pass filter.

    Set to 96khz, the problem goes away.

    The final test, was to play a block of sound, and check that it is not 'leaking' out into the rest of the sound spectrum. Here I chose white noise, with a high-pass @5khz and a low-pass @10khz:

    [​IMG]

    What you have here is a lot of low frequency noise induced when recording, not a desirable characteristic.

    All in all, the card is fine. It's a decent laptop soundcard, and actually does seem to have full 96khz/24bit recording. It is though, heavily marred by the lack of a line-in port to make use of this. A bit of an odd decision, especially since they don't seem to have marketed it's credentials as a 24bit sound device.

    Summary : fine sound input for a microphone. Very poor input used as a line-in.
     
  4. To no End

    To no End Notebook Evangelist

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    My BMS33 Vaio bluetooth mouse (the one that looks like a pebble) broke after about 7 months of use. Left click is no longer responsive but right click is fine. Opened it up to see if there was something affecting the parts but unfortunately that's not the case and most likely i've worn it out after use with a lot of left clicks in AutoCAD or gaming.

    They are nice visual complements to the F series though and I had no connection problems with it. When it was working, it was actually very responsive though holding the mouse needed getting used to.

    Can anyone suggest a bluetooth mouse that can look just as well with the F but handles better??
     
  5. Willscary

    Willscary Notebook Evangelist

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    #1 TurboBoost is Intel's way of factory overclocking. It is built-in to the processor itself. I have the Core i7 820QM processor, which is rated at 1.73GHz. When running benchmarks, I can watch a single core go as high as 3.06GHz, and stay at that speed for the duration of the testing...sometimes as long as 20 minutes. I would guess that in a relatively cool environment, it could run at this speed indefinitely. Two core testing yields both cores running at 2.8GHz. Three cores run at 2.33GHz. All 4 cores at 100% during benchmarking will run at 2.0GHz for an extended period of time.

    As a clarification, I am not sure if everyone gets these types of speeds. I have all of my Windows performance settins set to maximum performance, both plugged-in and on battery. Also, I use a small program called "i7Turbo" to turn off EIST and C1E. These two instruction sets are turned on by default when Windows starts, so whenever I restart my machine, I run "i7Turbo" and turn these instruction sets off. This keeps my machine from throttling down at idle and at other times when the processor decides that it doesn't need all the power. This cost battery power and uses more power when plugged in, but it makes overall performance rise quite a bit, at least when benchmarking.

    #2 Search back a few weeks (on this thread) and you will see where we were comparing the amount of temperatures our individual machines were producing. After 20 minutes with all 4 cores plus the GPU running at 100% load (a very unlikely real-world scenario), the highest my machine went was something like 73C. This is actually MUCH cooler than other Core i7 laptops that have been tested in this way.

    #3 Sorry, but I can not help you much as I am not a gamer. The GT330M GPU is apparently a capable gaming GPU, but not AS capable as the best ATI GPUs or the newest Nvidia Fermi GPUs. Look for Mangosango on this thread. He is able to play a lot of games with this machine, and has posted quite a few youtube videos showing the results of his playing.
     
  6. philm94

    philm94 Notebook Geek

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    To clarify slightly, TurboBoost is less about 'overclocking' than it is realising that the limitation of a multicore design is the lower clock speed on each core.

    The thermal design on a quad core has to be able to withstand all 4 cores running at 100% (max thermal output).

    With only two cores running, you have less thermal output. It's not quite half, but it is a lot less. What TurboBoost does is say: "Right, we can run four cores at xxxxhz safely without overheating, how quickly can I run just two?"

    It then ramps up the clock speed till it reaches a level that it feels is safe.

    One clear advantage of the Vaio F is it's fantastic cooling; my i7 reaches maximum TurboBoost and stays there indefinitely :) A lot of Laptop owners (ALienware m15x .. HP envy ...) are discovering that using their machine flat-out will eventually induce throttling, as the cooling system can't cope and temperatures spiral towards design limits.
     
  7. nightwish5331

    nightwish5331 Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hi 2 all.
    I want to make a recovery disc for F11 series.but I don`t know how I can.
    pls help.
     
  8. Willscary

    Willscary Notebook Evangelist

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    +1 Rep given. Informative post.
     
  9. danielh97

    danielh97 Notebook Geek

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    Desperately need a response.. you know that i7Turbo appllication u mentioned.. can you clarify on the instruction sets it turns off?

    Also does it stop it from throttling down on battery power? Because when on battery power my F11 always throttles down to 900 megahertz.. even with high performance set. Does the i7Turbo solve this problem?
     
  10. isikayhan

    isikayhan Notebook Enthusiast

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