*** Official Sager NP9877 / Clevo P870TM-G Owner's Lounge! - Phoenix 4 ***

Discussion in 'Sager/Clevo Reviews & Owners' Lounges' started by Spartan, Oct 5, 2017.

  1. jc_denton

    jc_denton Notebook Deity

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    Glad that it worked. You might want to tighten up the auto values up if you care about performance, or even push the frequency higher. As for stability, really depends on how stable you need it to be. You can run something like MemTest or memtest86.
     
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  2. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

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    Given the small benefits in performance I would tune towards stability ;)
     
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  3. Tyranus07

    Tyranus07 Notebook Consultant

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    Well I've been using the laptop the whole day and haven't had any BSOD or hangs. I haven't played though, just ran a few tests of Batman AK. I just don't want to have any BSOD I hate those. I guess as the service manual says the laptop supports 2667 MHz RAM that speed shouldn't be as hard to keep it 24/7. Do you see any real world difference going from 2667 MHz to 3000 MHz on RAM?
     
  4. IllusiveMan

    IllusiveMan Notebook Consultant

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    Maybe it's the RAM instability at 3000MHz?
    I am running 2 dimms in p750dm2 with 8086k at 3000 (XMP) and no issues at all, even temps aren't getting high on RAMs.

    edit: check the chips installed on dimms, if these really have correct timings set to whats in the memory spec sheets, if you can find specs for them..
     
  5. jc_denton

    jc_denton Notebook Deity

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    The short answer is it depends.

    Longer answer, if you mostly use the laptop for gaming, I'd lookup some benchmarks for the games you play comparing 2667Mhz ram vs higher clocked ones. Some games will see greater benefits than others, and you can judge whether it would be worth it to spend time on pushing your ram further or not.
     
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  6. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

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    It's the highly threaded games that load all the cores that tend to benefit.
     
  7. Tyranus07

    Tyranus07 Notebook Consultant

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    Wow I watched a couple of videos on YT on Batman Arkham Knight and Assassin's Creed Origin @1080p and you get a solid 10 fps+ with 3000 MHz over 2133 MHz, that's a lot IMO. How far you think I can push my 2666 MHz modules for a 24/7 stable use????
     
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  8. bennyg

    bennyg Notebook Virtuoso

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    It depends, my old 2666cl18 gskill modules from 11/2015 do 2800cl17 @ 1.3vdimm, but I hate ram OC and have never ever found a good flowchart for tweaking secondaries so there may be a limiter there
     
  9. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

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    Every kit can be so different, but the primary timings are the ones to focus on more.
     
  10. jc_denton

    jc_denton Notebook Deity

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    My approach to ram overclocking,

    1. Set very lose primary timings, ie. 21-25-25 and AUTO or 0 for the rest.
    2. Find max frequency with reasonable voltage. ie. 1.35v
    3. Begin to tighten up primary timings one by one, ie. cl 19 to cl 18cl etc. then tRCD and tRP.
    4. Slowly bring down the secondary timings.
    5. Slowly improve tertiary timings.

    I use Buildzoid's approach to quickly test all the ram up to 5% in MemTest, whilst tightening up the timings.
    Majority of the time, If the timings are too tight, your memory will begin puking errors before 5%.
    Then you proceed to either loosen up or tighten the timing further, testing it and redoing the previous step to find the lowest stable setting.

    It's this rinse and repeat process until you have gone through all the timings you wanted to improve. Last step would be running MemTest to 400% or more for stability.
     
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