**Official Sager NP9175 / Clevo P775TM Owner's Lounge!**

Discussion in 'Sager/Clevo Reviews & Owners' Lounges' started by Ultra Male, Oct 6, 2017.

  1. ThatOldGuy

    ThatOldGuy Notebook Deity

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    It is super easy to do. No reason to need someone else to do it.
     
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  2. Robertjan88

    Robertjan88 Notebook Guru

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    What about guarantee? What happens if you reduce the voltage too much and the laptop doesn't start any longer?
     
  3. yrekabakery

    yrekabakery Notebook Deity

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    Fn+D while pressing the power button to reset BIOS to default.
     
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  4. BrightSmith

    BrightSmith Notebook Consultant

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    Read the Throttlestop guide. There's a big one on the forums here, but this is a better start. If there's a problem and you get a BSOD the values are returned to the last stable configuration. If I'm not mistaken chances you'll brick your cpu by undervolting are very slim, if not impossible.

    For warranty questions you'll have to ask your reseller. As a reseller I wouldn't mind my customer undervolting because it will extend the life of the cpu...
     
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  5. ThatOldGuy

    ThatOldGuy Notebook Deity

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    You cannot brick a laptop with undervolting. It is impossible to damage components with too little voltage.

    In the rare case the bois settings do not revert to default on their own after BSOD. You can use keyboard command on start, or more directly do a hard reset by removing BIOS battery and do a hard reset.
     
  6. bennyg

    bennyg Notebook Deity

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    Experiment in Windows with Throttlestop, and it won't automatically load the BSOD-inducing undervolt at POST, as it's only a temporary setting.

    When you have figured out the settings you want and have made sure they're stable, then you set them in BIOS. (I actually don't bother with BIOS anymore and just have my CPU and GPU overclock profiles auto-loaded at startup with Throttlestop and Afterburner)
     
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  7. m4gg0t

    m4gg0t Notebook Consultant

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    Is IA AC/DA Loadline safe to use? Do you also undervolt your uncore?
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2018 at 2:51 PM
  8. yrekabakery

    yrekabakery Notebook Deity

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    Loadline 1 is safe to use. I didn't touch the uncore.
     
  9. m4gg0t

    m4gg0t Notebook Consultant

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    it seems like underload 4.5GHz my CPU is only using 1.18v with offset -85mv. When i use static volts 1.25v with loadline 1 i get IRQL NOT LESS OR EQUAL TO BSOD just using the CPUZ stress test. o_O. Temps are crazy also.
     
  10. yrekabakery

    yrekabakery Notebook Deity

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    With a voltage override of 1250mV and AC Loadline set to 1 (which disables LLC), you're probably putting about 1.1V into the CPU under load, so it's gonna BSOD at 4.5GHz unless the CPU is a good sample (which yours is not). You can see how much vdroop you're getting with DC Loadline at its default setting of 0.

    With AC Loadline and DC Loadline both set to 1, this disables both LLC and vdroop reporting. So the VID will be locked at the voltage override, which hides the vdroop that is happening and causes instability unless you increase the voltage override to compensate for the lack of LLC. This is why setting AC/DC Loadline to 1 is not a good idea on Clevos, although @ole!!! might disagree. Setting AC Loadline to 1 is fine on MSIbooks because, as @Falkentyne has mentioned, MSIbooks already have built-in LLC separate from AC Loadline, so setting AC Loadline to 1 simply removes that extra layer of LLC which is overvolting and causing heat issues under load.

    Thanks for indulging me on that little experiment. I wanted to confirm my own findings on a different system :p.

    Anyway, try 4.5GHz at 1.25V static again, but with AC/DC Loadline at their defaults, and see if your temps decrease.
     
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