*Official* nVidia GTX 20xx Series notebook discussion thread

Discussion in 'Gaming (Software and Graphics Cards)' started by Alias, Jan 26, 2019.

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  1. Zymphad

    Zymphad Zymphad

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    Sweet, the prices for laptop gaming continues to climb.
     
  2. JRE84

    JRE84 Notebook Deity

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    Lol yeah..pretty soon it will be 10s of thousands to play triple a games
     
  3. all9everything

    all9everything Notebook Enthusiast

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    for argument sake... my GL62VR with a gtx1060/16gb ram/i9/m2 ssd runs division 2 just fine @ 60fps. & that laptop could be had new @ $1400ish about a year ago (which i think is a pretty solid price point considering the hardware)

    i imagine ill get a solid 3 years of AAA gaming out of that without touching a thing outside of graphic settings in-game pending on framerates

    a 20xx card in a notebook is great to consider if $ is no object but definitely not necessary to have a robust gaming laptop for years to come
     
  4. cucubits

    cucubits Notebook Evangelist

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    I wonder if they come up with these prices based on some calculation related to the actual manufacturing cost of the thing or they just eyeball it because they can and the plebs (us) will happily pay...

    Example: About 3 years ago, I got a 17 inch laptop with top end gpu (at that time it was the 980m) for about $1500. Now, similar spec but current top end generation GPU (RTX2080) cost just about double that at $3k. It's very hard for me to believe that the manufacturing costs are that much higher...
     
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  5. Valdis

    Valdis Notebook Enthusiast

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    I was thinking the same thing today. I also have a 980M and though the laptop is starting to have bits fall off, its hard to justify spending twice as much for a machine that's only a marginal improvement. What's the point to having 200 fps on a 1080 screen?
     
  6. yrekabakery

    yrekabakery Notebook Virtuoso

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    Just keep in mind that the 980M was a low TDP, cut down chip for mobile with far less capable memory and PCB, similar to Max-Q nowadays but worse, so it’s not exactly an apples to oranges comparison with full-blown desktop parts. The successor to the 980M was the GTX 1070, which was offered at roughly comparable pricing. RTX however did raise pricing across the board.

    I had a 980M before, with this GTX 1080 I’m getting well over twice the performance at 1080p. Basically at the settings I was using previously to achieve 60 FPS, I can now do 120+ FPS with room to spare for my 120Hz display.

    Edit: And depending on the games and settings you play at, a 2080 isn’t getting anywhere near 200 FPS at 1080p. Here is my overclocked 1080 (slightly faster than stock 150W 2080) in Battlefield V at 1080p Ultra, it cannot even lock my 120Hz refresh rate.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2019
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  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Nvidia delivers the GPU at a fixed price and the manufacturers integrating it have to pass the costs of components and manufacture on to the buyer - with a small margin.

    Apple / Steve Jobs perfected the "Cloud of Confusion" or the "Reality Distortion Field" around hardware using mystical philosophical allusions to increase their margins.

    Using facts, hardware specs clears the air too much and reduces margins.

    Nvidia tries to use this method to mystify their products as well, and it takes a lot of countering their marketing with truth by pointing out the actual reality - the failures to deliver on direct and indirect "promises", you've got to get specific with facts against fantasy.

    It's been a decades long battle of truth against fantasy in a business that needs facts and clear thinking to implement solutions to real problems using hardware. It has to be real hardware delivering real benefits.

    This is a real problem, even Tesla almost fell victim to Nvidia's over promising - fortunately Tesla had people that countered with the truth, facts, and reality.

    Like Apple the reality cost them hundreds of millions in losses.

    It's a tough enough world out there, if you start believing in fantasies as realities it comes up to bite you quickly and in costly ways.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2019
  8. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Another full 2080 laptop :)

    ASUS ROG G703GX Review - i9-8950HK RTX 2080
    XOTIC PC
    Published on Mar 22, 2019
    Product review for the ASUS ROG G703GX. To customize your own and learn more about the G703GX visit here:
    https://www.xoticpc.com/asus-rog-g703...
     
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  9. Joikansai

    Joikansai Notebook Deity

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    Another dual power brick laptop:)
     
  10. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Yeah, it's not so much a detraction as it is an indicator of power needed for full performance.

    Imagine if your desktop was limited to a single 330w power supply, it wouldn't get very far would it?

    The power supply industry does need to grow the power brick maximum a bit higher, up from 330w, even with die shrinks that won't reduce power usage enough to avoid needing more power delivery to the laptop.

    It's weird how people think high performance can be accomplished without the "distractions" of power delivery and thermal cooling.

    Thin laptops and thin power bricks can't deliver high performance CPU / GPU laptops. Even if short term benchmark numbers can be manipulated to show otherwise.

    Those thin laptops with high pitched loud screaming fans while gaming are far more annoying than carrying a larger and heavier frame laptop that can offer better power, and less shrill cooling.
     
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