*Official* NBR Desktop Overclocker's Lounge [laptop owners welcome, too]

Discussion in 'Desktop Hardware' started by Mr. Fox, Nov 5, 2017.

  1. Robbo99999

    Robbo99999 Notebook Prophet

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  2. ajc9988

    ajc9988 Death by a thousand paper cuts

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    It is interesting, but software really needs to catch up, along with anticompetitive crap from all parties ending and heading to open source. Nvidia GameWorks and Intel's math kernel library come to mind. Gomacs and MATLAB use Intel's MKL. Intel has where the software vendor has to apply a patch they made years ago so that when it sees an AMD CPU, it doesn't default to SSE1 and SSE2 instruction sets. But Intel also doesn't make it easy to find documentation on needing the patch nor does it make it known to vendors that they should patch it. This is holdover behavior from the Intel compiler days. gomacs patched their software in October, but with MATLAB, you have to go in and hard set the program to use AVX2 for AMD Zen CPUs. Once you do, the Zen 2 CPUs often beat Intel in the tasks they said do to show off Intel's high points, meaning they kneecap their competitor and say look at how good we are.

    But those games will be changing quickly. More interesting is Intel's CXL technology and Gen Z I think it is. CXL allows for memory, storage, and cache coherency between all of your add-in cards, system memory, GPU memory, etc. Everyone is signing on for this. Gen Z is similar, allowing coherency between nodes using PCIe PHY. So they are not necessarily competing tech, rather they are complementary.

    So with PCIe 5.0, we get CXL and Gen z. AMD joined the CXL coalition, so this is not an Intel exclusive, rather an industry changing shift, one that Intel needs applauded for. AMD had a coherent standard for PCIe 4.0 PHY (forgot the name), and claims they will continue support and will not abandon it while adopting Intel's standard, but Intel's, on paper, is more robust.

    This is leading to something incredible. Being able to scale, access other components memory or storage in fewer steps, thereby speeding up processing. This allows for creation of ASICs for specific tasks, better offloading, etc. That is what I'm excited about for where it may go, depending on good APIs and software to really use it.

    In the next 10 years, it very well may be a shift larger than the intro of x64 to the market to getting sandy bridge. Just think of how much more power we have now versus a decade ago. Granted, some stagnation in that decade, but still huge. What I can't see beyond is the 2025 mark, so to speak.
     
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  3. ssj92

    ssj92 Neutron Star

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    Intel Xeon E5-1660 v3 came yesterday...tempting me to install.

    I was supposed to get a Noctua NH-D15 cooler today (yeah..I kinda going crazy with my desktop..this is why I can't have a desktop LOL) today but it looks like it will be delayed.

    Should I just throw in the Xeon with the current AIO cooler? :D
     
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  4. Robbo99999

    Robbo99999 Notebook Prophet

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    Yes, some changes are within the horizon, changes are afoot......soon to be gone are the days of 4 core CPUs, some RAM, and a hard drive or SSD....it seems to be in the process of some new standards arriving, changing what we currently know as a PC. Yes, I'm being vague because I don't know all the plans, but there's some big changes afoot I think. I would bet if I build a PC this coming year it might be the last one of this 'era' before some of these big changes come about (if I was to keep it 4 or 5 yrs).
     
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  5. ajc9988

    ajc9988 Death by a thousand paper cuts

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    If you can hold off until PCIe 5.0 PHY and processors able to use CXL, do so. If nothing else, cool things may be possible with GPUs and add-in cards. But some won't shake to the consumer until 2022-23, about the time PCIe 6.0 is adopted, which gen Z and CXL will be compatible with. This is what they were trying to do for true "scalability" and heading toward true heterogeneous platform support.
     
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  6. Talon

    Talon Notebook Virtuoso

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    Nice, did you get a J batch chip? Should start with a J instead of an L. I would install it just to make sure it works, and then you have comparison of your AIO to the Air setup.
     
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  7. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    Last edited: Dec 6, 2019
  8. ssj92

    ssj92 Neutron Star

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    Last edited: Dec 6, 2019
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  9. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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  10. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    This tool from Galax works with the Galax HOF Xtreme 2080 Ti 2000W vBIOS. You get a real old school voltage slider and not panty-waist wussboy voltage offset crap like MSI Afterburner and Precision XOC.

    upload_2019-12-6_21-11-14.png
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2019
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