*Official* NBR Desktop Overclocker's Lounge [laptop owners welcome, too]

Discussion in 'Desktop Hardware' started by Mr. Fox, Nov 5, 2017.

  1. JoeT44

    JoeT44 Notebook Consultant

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  2. ekkolp

    ekkolp Notebook Evangelist

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    Hi guys, do you think this voltage is too high for an 9700k @5ghz?

    upload_2019-4-16_22-41-4.png

    There are a lot of sensor's in HWMonitor I'm not sure which to look at XD.
     
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  3. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox Undefiled BGA-Hating Elitist

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    That should be fine. I wouldn't worry about it. Anything below 1.500V with good temps is a generally safe core voltage range and you are way less than that.

    If you look in your BIOS, many UEFI desktop enthusiast motherboards will indicate a "normal" or "safe" voltage range by text color, side-bar "help" information, or both. When you see the text change to red for manually applied settings, that is your clue that you are pushing it to a limit that requires more caution and extraordinary cooling (assuming your BIOS has color coding like that). The text colors like cyan, yellow and pink are fine as long as your temps are good.
     
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  4. Robbo99999

    Robbo99999 Notebook Prophet

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    I have a 6700K that I've been using overclocked and delidded with temperatures in the 20-60 degC range during use and never above around 65degC during any stress testing I've done, and I saw a small amount of CPU degredation whilst using 1.4V as the VCore value - I saw about 8mv of CPU degredation over a period of a year. There was a guy that did some CPU degredation testing of 7700K CPUs at different voltages, and he found that at 1.45V you would lose a really tight overclock over a period of a year, which is similar to my experience. Have a read of my post here for more details (which also includes a link to his testing too): http://forum.notebookreview.com/thr...ers-welcome-too.810490/page-296#post-10766430.
    Based on extrapolations of his testing I worked out that 1.35V was completely safe, and that is what I'm using now. One of his findings was that you definitely shouldn't use 1.5V and under no circumstances 1.55V - those statements might not apply when using exotic cooling like chilled water or something, but only if CPU is running at very low temperatures, afterall I saw CPU degredation when my CPU was normally operating in the 40's & 50's during gaming. Some people think that up to 1.45V is safe: https://www.overclock.net/forum/5-intel-cpus/1570313-skylake-overclocking-guide-statistics.html

    At 1.35V though you'll be totally fine, and you're below that, so you're good to go.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2019
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  5. Johnksss

    Johnksss .

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    Looks like I have now joined the 27K over all - 31K+ GPU club. Was basically waiting on the A51M to beat my last score.
    Looks like it's no longer a side view or a rear view window. More like 3 car links back. :D
    Firestrike_P_27066_9900K_2080.PNG
     
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  6. Prema

    Prema Your Freedom, Your Choice

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    Good to see the King finally move that lazy a$$ of his and push the power button on his system! :D

    Welcome to the 27/31 club! :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2019
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  7. ekkolp

    ekkolp Notebook Evangelist

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    Thank you for your answers!
    Are you talking about LLC? In that case, Aorus makes the following division: Xtreme, Turbo, Ultra, High, Medium, Low, Auto (and disabled I believe). I can post some pictures when I arrive home if you want.
    Right now I have it in Turbo, which is the second higher value. I think I maybe should drop it to medium, but it would make me increase vCORE voltage.
    Temps are quite good I think, playing BFV stays around 45-55ºC depending on the circumstances.
    What concerns me more it's the fact I don't really know what sensor should I check in order to be sure what is the actual voltage CPU is taking, because there are a tons of vCORE values in HWMonitor, LOL.
     
  8. Robbo99999

    Robbo99999 Notebook Prophet

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    Ah, you have more than one VCore value! Playing it safe you'd make sure that all of the VCore values were below your chosen maximum, but that's only if you don't know which one is the 'accurate' one. You might want to Google which VCore value you should be paying attention to when it comes to Gigabyte motherboards. Having said that, I'm sure there are people here that have used Gigabyte motherboards that can advise you which VCore reading is the closest to reality.

    Mr Fox is talking about the font colour in the BIOS for where you tell the motherboard how much voltage to use (either as an offset in mv or as a static voltage depending on what 'mode' of overclocking you're using), probably not the LLC value although LLC value will also influence how much VCore you get when under load - it's a load balancer for the VCore that combats vdroop. vdroop is the natural phenomenon of seeing increasingly lower VCore as CPU Watt consumption increases. Ideally you want a flat VCore reading when under significant CPU loads, and LLC is just a means of fudging an offset/adjustment to the amount of voltage 'asked for' as load increases to attain that flat voltage as load increases. On my board I just leave LLC at Auto/default, and I think I read generally that most default LLC options are fine with most motherboards. If you increase LLC to a too high level, then under load you will actually get an increased or greatly increased VCore, which can be dangerous, so be careful if you experiment with the higher levels of LLC.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2019
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  9. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox Undefiled BGA-Hating Elitist

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    Every brand seems to use slightly different terminology for certain setting and that tends to help make things a little more confusing, but I was referring to all settings relating to voltage values having color coding and side bar help. Not sure if Gigabyte is like that, but my ASUS and EVGA motherboards have used color coding for all voltage values. LLC has more to do with fluctuations in core voltage during different load conditions rather that the actual voltage values.
     
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  10. Raiderman

    Raiderman Notebook Deity

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    I'm just at the /31 club. Maybe when Ryzen 3xxx hits, I will join that club.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
     
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