*OFFICIAL* Alienware X Series Owners Lounge and Discussion

Discussion in '2015+ Alienware 13 / 15 / 17' started by HaloGod2012, May 11, 2021.

  1. etern4l

    etern4l Notebook Virtuoso

    Reputations:
    2,798
    Messages:
    3,331
    Likes Received:
    3,247
    Trophy Points:
    331
    Just grab none off Amazon? Come to think of it, 330W is likely quoted as the external power draw. Then the adapter has some efficiency, probably in the region of 70-80%, which means that 210W power budget for the CPU and GPU is all you are going to get. Which would explain why some other high-end laptops have dual power power bricks...
     
    bsch3r likes this.
  2. captn.ko

    captn.ko Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    337
    Messages:
    981
    Likes Received:
    1,251
    Trophy Points:
    156
    Dont forget fans, Display, SSD etc... They need power too.

    The 330w should have more than 70%... That would result in 100w of heat would have to be dissipated.

    No. efficiency losses are added on top. The 330w adapter provide 330w to the components. Under full load you see 330w + efficiency losses at the kill a watt.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2021
  3. werdmonkey4321

    werdmonkey4321 Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    95
    Messages:
    351
    Likes Received:
    286
    Trophy Points:
    76
    I haven't seen a power supply ever being rated based on how much it draws from the wall. The rated wattage always indicates much power it can output. So in this case the 330W power supply can deliver 330W to the X17.
     
    shardey and captn.ko like this.
  4. etern4l

    etern4l Notebook Virtuoso

    Reputations:
    2,798
    Messages:
    3,331
    Likes Received:
    3,247
    Trophy Points:
    331
    How do you know that? Not sure about laptop power adapters, but aren't all desktop power supplies rated on the external draw basis? Otherwise it would be an electrical safety issue.
     
  5. captn.ko

    captn.ko Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    337
    Messages:
    981
    Likes Received:
    1,251
    Trophy Points:
    156
    No.

    Screenshot_20210816-100231.jpg
    OUTPUT 330w ;)

    My AX1500i
    ax06s.jpg
    DC OUTPUT on 12v Rail 1500w.


    Same with every other power supply, same with electric engines. The information on the typeplate indicates the nominal power that can be delivered.

    Efficiency varies (among other things) depending on load and temperature. How should an engineer design a system to the power supply when the specification indicates the input side and the engineer does not know exactly how much power the power supply can provide?
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2021
    alaskajoel, raz8020 and etern4l like this.
  6. pitha1337

    pitha1337 Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    71
    Messages:
    288
    Likes Received:
    252
    Trophy Points:
    76
    DanteDrac, c69k, turilo and 5 others like this.
  7. etern4l

    etern4l Notebook Virtuoso

    Reputations:
    2,798
    Messages:
    3,331
    Likes Received:
    3,247
    Trophy Points:
    331
    Well, I stand corrected. Makes sense. Still not clear where the often encountered advice to never load a desktop PSU above around 60% comes from.

    Anyway, I failed at playing the devil's advocate here: looks like there is plenty of power to push the CPU+GPU past 210W. Perhaps the limitation is there because that's where Dell thinks the safety limit is due to the capacity of the combined thin cooling solution.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2021
  8. werdmonkey4321

    werdmonkey4321 Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    95
    Messages:
    351
    Likes Received:
    286
    Trophy Points:
    76
    The peak of the efficiency curve for a PSU occurs roughly when you're running it at 40-60% of it's rated capacity. That's where that 60% figure comes from.
     
    etern4l likes this.
  9. bsch3r

    bsch3r Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    252
    Messages:
    519
    Likes Received:
    947
    Trophy Points:
    106
    20210816_132947.jpg The X17 equipped with a 3080 and an i9 is capable of using up to 240 Watt for the CPU and GPU alone, like can be ssen in this screenshot where I ran Superposition bench and Cinebench R23 in the background. This goes on till the CPU reaches 100C, then it is hard throttling the cpu frequency down to 2xxx MHz for a while. Add in the rest of the components and I guess it will draw around 280W from the wall for some time till it overheats. I will check tomorrow with a watt meter. If I could get my CPU from not overheating (LM anyone?), the 330W power brick would be justified.

    In modern (RTX) games however, I see the GPU mostly around 150-165W and the CPU around 40W. You have to really torture the X17 to get it to consume around 240W combined CPU+GPU, but it is possible.
     
    etern4l likes this.
  10. etern4l

    etern4l Notebook Virtuoso

    Reputations:
    2,798
    Messages:
    3,331
    Likes Received:
    3,247
    Trophy Points:
    331
    OK, false alarm then ;)
     
    bsch3r likes this.
Loading...

Share This Page