*OFFICIAL* Alienware m15 Owner's Lounge

Discussion in '2015+ Alienware 13 / 15 / 17' started by ssj92, Oct 25, 2018.

  1. rinneh

    rinneh Notebook Prophet

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    nah i think it should be able to cool the chips sufficiently. The heatsinks are almost of similar size as the full size 15 models. as long if the pressur eis good. i tshould cool down the components sufficiently. But now the CPU plate barely touches the CPU die. Its only thick thermal paste holding it together if you have a bad heatsink.
     
  2. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKs Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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    You pack same hardware in a lot smaller footprint/thickness. NVMe ssd's, PCH chips etc. All throw out heat. Not only Cpu, GPU and heatsink.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. rinneh

    rinneh Notebook Prophet

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    The full AW15R3/R4 wastes a lot of space because of the midframe, so the internal space is a lot smaller than might appear at first sight. Its only about 3mm/4mm thicker actually, but the mid frame, battery package (its housed in a plastic casing instead of just bare battery cells), mechanical HDD + the 99wh battery makes the space just as cramped. Later I will send you a photo of the heatsink of the AW15R3, the intake part of the heatsinks are just as thin as the M15, just the exhaust part of a tad higher because of the hinge forward frame.
     
  4. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKs Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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    Don't forget there is a reason Dell didn't throw out m15 with i9-8950Hk from the beginning. Or maybe they have learned from 15R4 ? But I doub't it. Even Dell's engineers could see how this would/could end.
    Put it the other way... I'm sure they would done it due the added +$600 sales price if it was possible.
     
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  5. Devianti

    Devianti Notebook Consultant

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    1. That's a gamble. If the laptop tries to draw more current than the power supply can provide it will either kill the PSU / blow a fuse / best case the PSU will handle it 'smartly' - I would always advise to use something that is rated equivalent or over the minimum requirement, whatever the hardware may be. A general rule of electronics is "don't f*ck with amperage".

    2. No idea, sorry.

    3. Also not so sure, but I have an old M14xR2 that *did* accept a 3rd party power supply in a sudden moment of need. That's 2012 though, so all bets are off.

    Good luck! I hope the m15 works out for you, I'm on the precipice of purchasing one myself... ;)
     
  6. Rei Fukai

    Rei Fukai Notebook Deity

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    i agree with you up to a certain point. The picture sums up the problem in one glance. The R series has a block of copper at the end where the air flows through, that block is a solid block with fins where the air passes through. I think by removing that block off the exhaust, they've made it harder for the heatpipes to extract, or transfer the heat to where it is cold. the problem is that the m15 block. can fit four maybe five times within the 15 R4 exhaust block. That alone gives it a disadvantage, cause the now the copper exhaust block is intergraded where it is warm, and with the R series, it's a extra piece away from the heat.

    the "badonkadonk" off the R series moves the heatsink away from the body, and away from all the heat, so there can be a temperature difference so the heat can really travel from warm to cold. not warm to warm (like the m15)
     
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  7. rinneh

    rinneh Notebook Prophet

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    The i( is not a good idea in any 15inch laptop, they shouldnt have released it in the 15R4 either imo.
     
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  8. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKs Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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    All thinner laptops (both 15 or 17 inches chassis) should have Intel® Core™ i5-8300H or Intel® Core™ i5-8400H Processor. A lot cheaper as well and they would throttle less. The thicker models should max have 6 core i7-8750H and power cap for less throttling.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2019
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  9. Rei Fukai

    Rei Fukai Notebook Deity

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    true that, or really improve the heatsink and make a dual vapor chambered heatsink.

    (This is not a heatsink, but a full vapor chamber design over the cpu and gpu from the razor blade 15)
     

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  10. Alex555

    Alex555 Notebook Consultant

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    I5 options at least would be great. But anyway I think the alienware M15 is still among the better thin and light gaming laptops.
    Unlike some competitors (razer blade or msi GS65) they give you the opportunity to let your laptop run with higher temperatures and higher clockspeeds. The competitors have lower cpu clocks out of the box, therefore giving you better temps.
    The Hexa I7 are generally hard to cool, even bigger chassis struggle to do so. High temperatures or tweaking with repasting are the price one has to pay for portability and mobility.
    Almost every thin and light gaming laptop has its own problems, the zephyrus has the battery issue for example, other sacrifice performance.
    If you want the maximum out of the components, you have to go big ;)
    And as long as you still get a decent clock speed (3,6 ghz or so with all cores) its still great, and technically is no thermal throttling.
    I guess the only real solution for the problem will be 7nm.
    Didnt even the 17 R5 struggle to cool the I9 down? Those chips are just hot (literally) :D
     
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