Official 2012 Sony S Series Owners Thread

Discussion in 'VAIO / Sony Owners' Lounge Forum' started by Petrov, Jun 9, 2012.

  1. jeremyshaw

    jeremyshaw Big time Idiot

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    I know it's probably way too late, but I did this a while back and Vaio Control Center lost a number of functions, namely Battery Care. A few other things are also missing from Vaio CC (KB backlight control, ambient light sensor, etc).

    I have tried to find a way to restore them, but after many hours, no success. About a year later (today), I tried again, also to no success (and the Sony community forums are about half broken now).

    I'd recommend making a copy of the restore DVD material, and using that to reinstall the factory Windows 8 image and update that to Windows 10.

    Good luck!


    EDIT: to add insult to injury, the Sony Firmware Extension Parser will not install at all. One of them will, but SYNA008 will not. The Windows 8 drivers refuse to even be recognized on Windows 10 (for that specific device), and the Windows 10 drivers are just the Windows 8 drivers, lol.

    EDIT2: I think I will try installing Windows 8 and going from there to see if it all works from that base.

    EDIT3: Stroke of luck. I went to the Sony Asia site, hoping they would have different driver/utility policies, and they do! SYNA008 is still missing a driver, but installing the Windows 7 version of Vaio Control Center (Notebook Utilities) did the trick in Windows 10.

    https://www.sony-asia.com/electroni...-svs1311-series/svs13116fg/downloads/Y0017677

    My battery care is restored, as is the ambient KB backlight. Ambient screen backlight doesn't seem to be working, but it's of little concern to me - it never gave an appropriate backlight level for the ambient conditions the laptop was in.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2018
  2. jeremyshaw

    jeremyshaw Big time Idiot

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    I think I mentioned somewhere this laptop's fan was running a heroic battle to keep the laptop cool. I take that back. Dust simply built up in a very well designed, hard to access crevice that basically blocked the entire fin array. I thought I had cleared it out from the top, but I was previously mistaken. While the overall performance of the laptop is still the same after cleaning, thermals are improved (though I did also take the time to repaste the CPU and GPU.


    In this image, I have a new appreciation for the engineers at Sony. Predating the on-package southbridge (PCH in Intel-speak), it still managed to cram in a Nvidia dGPU (and overclocked it a bit from the factory - 540MHz vs 500MHz), the CPU, the southbridge, one dedicated heatpipe per chip, dual channel RAM, and a bluray player. All with a full complement of ports (VGA, HDMI, 3x USB, Ethernet, docking port on the bottom, SD card and Sony's proprietary card readers. All in a laptop that basically shares identical dimensions to my E5450 (or a T480 for a modern comparison). Sure, it has a 13.3" display vs the 14" display, but 13.3" isn't that far off from 14" (unlike 15.6" vs 14").

    vaio.JPG

    After this last disassembly/reassembly, it seems even the display cable issue has resolved itself. I should have done a thorough disassembly 3 1/2 years ago and saved myself the cost of one Dell E5450.


    EDIT: after the cleaning/repasting, the Cinebench score comes out to 303 - identical to my E5450 (which was cleaned/repasted a couple of months ago). i7-3520m vs i7-5600U. Sure, the older chip draws much more power under load and clocks higher, but that does go to show: there is always one way to out-muscle clever design - sheer force and brutality. I also noted the older i7 uses 3.7W avg idle, compared to 2.2W avg idle for the newer i7. I wonder how the power is calculated, since the newer i7 includes its voltage regulators on-die, iirc. The CPU package power reading may not have included the older chip's off-package voltage regulators (VRMs). Part of the power difference is also down to base clocks: 1.2GHz vs 800MHz. This slightly higher power idle draw means the older i7 really does need the fan active at all times.

    Without the cleaning/repasting, the score was a consistent 262. Even with the clogged HSF and old factory paste, the Vaio held up better under full load (CPU+GPU) than the E5450, since the E5450 dropped clocks pretty quickly when the GPU was fired up (which would cause the E5450 to drop to ~260 or so), though the newer 840m is appreciably faster than the old 640m LE. Both are still annoying faster than the current Intel 630, though the 840 is matched by the newest crop of Intel Iris GPUs.

    EDIT2: The Vaio's older i7 is holding a steady 3.4GHz dual core boost n 82C vs the Dell E5450's i7's 2.9GHz dual core boost 98C in Cinebench. That's how the old Vaio is matching the newer Dell. I really have to download and install Dell's fan control software. The CPU is going to fry itself at this rate.

    Okay, I just tried again on the Dell, after downloading the power manager, which include fan profiles. "Ultra Performance" made the score worse (280), and the CPU is happily absconding above 100C.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2018
  3. SirRobin

    SirRobin Notebook Evangelist

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    Please, can somebody told me whats the latest version for VAIO Control Center i can download for a SVS13 Series? Thank you :)
     
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