NVME not recognized by windows help

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by hertzian56, Oct 7, 2021.

  1. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    If you have more than one M.2 slot, try putting it in the other one. It is fairly common for at least one M.2 slot to be a PCH slot with SATA support. Even if you are going to return it, knowing that the other slot supports SATA could be useful knowledge if you plan to later buy something like a 1TB M.2 SATA drive for storage. It also generally makes no difference which M.2 slot you use for the OS boot drive. Both should be bootable and usable for OS installation.
     
  2. hertzian56

    hertzian56 Notebook Deity

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    Will it mess up my system though? The other slot has the boot drive and I'm not too keen on messing with that.
     
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  3. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    No, not at all. You can move the current boot drive to the other slot and leave it there. I have done this literally hundreds of times. On my desktops I even use PCIe add-in cards with different NVMe SSDs with different OSes on them that I take in and swap the out between multiple systems. I generally install my crash test dummy OSes (latest and not so greatest OSes, like Windows 11,) that I view as expendable trash in this manner.

    It's not uncommon on the first boot of Windows for the OS to make a change in the background and tell you that you need to reboot. Much like moving a mouse to a different USB port Windows will sometimes go through a brief driver reinstallation process. Windows will automatically install the NVMe (or SATA) driver for the slot that used to be empty.

    I have also moved M.2 drives between slots on my laptops, and moved them to new laptops. It also generally makes no difference which M.2 slot you use for the OS boot drive. Both should be bootable and usable for OS installation. The only limitation is whether or not the slot supports SATA.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2021
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  4. hertzian56

    hertzian56 Notebook Deity

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    Hm might try it. The bios says nvme specifically though. Any way to find out what it supports, outside of the included phison above, besides trial and error? It's strange that this one is the long size, the msata's I have used from my old m6700 were half size. Big problem with this "gateway" off brand is that I really don't have much detailed info on it, there's no tech manual or never been bios etc updates probably never will be. It's just a walmart holiday deal that's kinda been abandoned. At least evoo has a functional website.
     
  5. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    I have never come across a limitation in hardware "support" other than M.2 NVMe-only versus M.2 NVMe/SATA compatible. The latter supports either/or, whereas the former only supports NVMe because it uses CPU lanes (versus PCH lanes). Legacy SATA ports generally run off of the PCH as well.

    Brand and SSD controller model number has never been something I have encountered an issue with, and your Gateway branded Tongfang whitebox unit should not be remarkably different than the same machines with different branding on the outside.

    I have seen limitations with off-brand NVMe drives that have SSD controllers that cannot be used for Windows 7 and Windows 8.X because there is no available driver support. That causes the drive to not be recognized by Windows, but it is still recognized by the BIOS.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2021
  6. hertzian56

    hertzian56 Notebook Deity

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    Agreed. In my experience they have a lot of unlocked stuff more than the major brands. It would be kind of strange that slots have different compatibilities though, they're right next to each other. NBC article says m2 2280 ssd support whatever that means exactly. I'm guessing the similar items they compared would be compatible too. 970, pm981, 660p, bc511
     
  7. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    2280 is the size of the PCB. 22mm wide and 80mm long. There are shorter lengths and there is a 22110 form factor (110mm long) that is generally not used except in server applications. I have a couple of Samsung 22110 NVMe enterprise drives. They are generally slower and do not allow enabling things that contribute corruption and data loss, such as write cache features. Although they are somewhat slower (but still very fast) than normal NVMe, they are far more reliable because of their intended application. If you use NVMe RAID0 they are less susceptible to drive membership corruption. They also often have large SMDs that lend to extreme duty and reliability. Most laptops do not support 22110 simply because there is no way to mount the NVMe because the screw standoff is in the wrong place and there is no place for the standoff nut to be relocated.

    If a slot is identified as "m2 2280 ssd" with no mention of NVMe, that may be an indication that it is a dual-purpose slot (NVMe/SATA). It could also be an indication of lack of attention to detail in the written documentation. I have seen a few random examples of laptops (usually older very low budget models) that have an M.2 slot that DOES NOT support NVMe. The OEM/ODM used the M.2 form factor to save space inside of the chassis, but the slot is SATA-only and there is no NVMe slot available. This can be due to the CPU being a low cost model that does not have enough PCIe lanes to support NVMe. The AMD AM4 current generation Athlon CPUs are an example of where you might see lack of NVMe support due to CPU being a very cheap product designed for low-performance applications (e.g. Athlon 3000G).

    Edit: This photo from one of my desktops is an example of an enterprise 22110 NVMe SSD. Note how huge all of the SMDs are. If you have a system that can use them, they are usually available on eBay for less than half the cost of a normal NVMe drive. The two I have are 1TB and I think I gave like $60 each for them several years ago. They are a very good value when you can find them used, (super expensive purchased new,) and sometimes available in bulk quantities, but they usually won't fit in a laptop or on a gamer-centric desktop mobo with decorative heat sinks that are designed to look fancy and hide the NVMe drives because the SMDs are too large and the heat sink won't fit.

    22110.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2021
  8. hertzian56

    hertzian56 Notebook Deity

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    Suspected that sloppiness because it is NBC and they skew a lot for the name brands etc Yeah guess it just didn't snap for me that 2280 was a size spec. At least it didn't cost me anything to try this, keep looking I guess.
     
  9. SierraFan07

    SierraFan07 Notebook Evangelist

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    Informative explanation, I learned alot from this. Thank you.

    Sent from my SM-G970U using Tapatalk
     
  10. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    Did the M.2 SATA work in the other port? Did you have a chance to try it?
    Certainly. You're welcome. I am glad you found it useful.
     
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