Nvidia Thread

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Dr. AMK, Jul 4, 2017.

  1. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Well then, back to consoles, and other hobbies for me. :)

    I enjoy PC gaming, but I am definitely not paying more than MSRP for a GPU.

    Many of us already have more than adequate GPU / CPU hardware for PC gaming for a few years, so it won't affect us right away if the PC Gaming Hardware market dies.

    There is still time for Nvidia / AMD to save it, which is what I am hoping will happen.

    Who is getting into PC gaming at these hyper inflated GPU, memory, etc prices??
     
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  2. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Not if they realize just how wrung out those miner GPU's are after being in service 24/7.

    I've seen them, you can tell them apart from a used gamer GPU. The GPU looks dried out, literally. And no matter how much they put into cleaning them up, they are dull pitted and easily identified.

    If you are about to complete a used GPU purchase, look at them closely before buying.

    If the GPU is boxed up, take it out of the box, out of the anti-static bag, and the first thing you do is take a close sniff to get the smell of the card, you can smell the "burn" in them - really.

    You can also tell miner's by checking their ad, and see how many times it appears over the months. I've been able to spot miner's GPU ad's easily on ebay and craigslist. Similarities maintain across ad's, look for them and they will stand out.

    There are fewer gamers selling their cards, and their ad's are up and gone quickly, because the *miners* want those sweet fresh GPU's for their own. The miners have ad's up for long periods with short gaps, before re-posting again and again.

    Given how poorly the miners GPU's are near EOL, I imagine most won't be presentable for sale. It's more of a warning to used GPU buyers to be aware that these people aren't going to represent these GPU's honestly, you are going to have to proactively figure it out on your own, and avoid getting stuck with one.

    It's not a good time to buy used GPU's either. :(
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2018
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  3. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKS = That sucks!! STAHP! Dont buy FILTH...

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    NVIDIA Cranks-Up GPU Production To Satisfy Gamers And Booming Cryptocurrency Mining Demand-Hothardware.com
    Best advice... Never have hurry. Will always come a deal who don’t ruin you.
     
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  4. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    As long as they get their prices to us back down to MSRP, even if we have to purchase direct from AIB vendors or even Nvidia, I won't pay higher than MSRP from distributors or retailers, and I hope noone else does either.

    AMD is also ramping up GPU production:

    AMD to Ramp up GPU Production, But RAM a Limiting Factor
    by Ryan Smith on January 31, 2018 7:15 AM EST
    https://www.anandtech.com/show/12380/amd-to-ramp-up-gpu-production-ram-a-limiting-factor
    "One of the more tricky issues revolving around the GPU shortages of the past several months has been the matter of how to address the problem on the GPU supply side of matters. While the crux of the problem has been a massive shift in demand driven by a spike in cryptocurrency prices, demand has also not tapered off like many of us would have hoped. And while I hesitate to define the current situation as the new normal, if demand isn’t going to wane then bringing video card prices back down to reasonable levels is going to require a supply-side solution.

    This of course sounds a lot easier than it actually is. Ignoring for the moment that GPU orders take months to process – there are a lot of steps in making a 16nm/14nm FinFET wafer – the bigger risk is that cryptocurrency-induced GPU demand is not stable. Ramping up GPU production means gambling that demand will stay high enough long enough to absorb the additional GPUs, and then not immediately contract and have the market flooded with used video cards. The latter being an important point that AMD got burnt on the last time this happened, when the collapse of the cryptocurrency-prices and the resulting demand for video cards resulted in the market becoming flooded with used Hawaii (290/390 series) cards.

    Getting to the heart of matters then, in yesterday’s Q&A session for their Q4’2017 earnings call, an analyst asked AMD about the current GPU supply situation and whether AMD would be ramping up GPU production. The answer, much to my surprise, was yes. But with a catch.

    Q: I just had a question on crypto, I mean if I look at the amount of hash compute being added to Ethereum in January I mean it's more than the whole of Q4, so we have seen a big start to the Q1. […] And is there any sort of acute shortages here, I man can your foundry partners do they have the capacity to support you with a ramp of GPUs at the moment and is there enough HBM2 DRAM to source as well?

    A: Relative to just where we are in the market today, for sure the GPU channel is lower than we would like it to be, so we are ramping up our production. At this point we are not limited by silicon per se, so our foundry partners are supplying us, there are shortages in memory and I think that is true across the board, whether you are talking about GDDR5, or you’re talking about high bandwidth memory. We continue to work through that, with our memory partners and that will be certainly one of the key factors as we go through 2018.

    So yes, AMD is ramping up GPU production. Which is a surprising move since they were burnt the last time they did this. At the same time however, while cryptocurrency demand has hit both major GPU manufacturers, AMD has been uniquely hit as they’re a smaller player less able to absorb rapid changes in demand, and, more importantly, their GPUs are better suited for the task. AMD’s tradition of offering more memory bandwidth and more raw FLOPS than NVIDIA at any competing price point, coupled with some meaningful architectural differences, means that their GPUs are in especially high demand by cryptocurrency miners.

    But perhaps the more interesting point here isn’t that AMD is increasing their GPU production, but why they can only increase it by so much. According to the company, they’re actually RAM-limited. They can make more GPUs, but they don’t have enough RAM – be it GDDR5 or HBM2 – to equip all of the cards AMD and board partners would like to make.

    This is an interesting revelation, as this is the first time memory shortages have been explicitly identified as an issue in this latest run-up. We’ve known that the memory market is extremely tight due to demand –with multiple manufacturers increasing their RAM prices and diverting GDDR5 production over to DDR4 – but only now is that catching up with video card production to the point that current GDDR5 production levels are no longer “enough”. Of course RAM of all types is still in high demand here at the start of 2018, so while memory manufacturers can reallocate some more production back to GDDR5, GPU and board vendors have to fight with both the server and mobile markets, both of which have their own booms in demand going on, and are willing to pay top dollar for the RAM they need.

    In a sense the addition of cryptocurrency to the mix of computing workloads has created a perfect storm in an industry that was already dealing with RAM shortages. The RAM market is in the middle of a boom right now – part of its traditional boom/bust cycle – and while it will eventually abate as demand slips and more production gets built, for the moment cryptocurrency mining has just added yet more demand for RAM that isn’t there. Virtually all supply/demand problems can be solved through higher prices – at some point, someone has to give up – but given the trends we’ve seen so far, GPU users are probably the most likely to suffer, as traditionally the GPU market has been built on offering powerful processors paired with plenty of RAM for paltry prices. Put another way, even if the GPU supply situation were resolved tomorrow and there were infinite GPUs for all, RAM prices would be a bottleneck that kept video card prices from coming back down to MSRP.

    With all that said, however, AMD’s brief response in their earnings call has been the only statement of substance they’ve made on the matter. So while the company is (thankfully) ramping up GPU production, they haven’t – and are unlikely to ever – disclose just how many more GPUs that is, or for that matter how much RAM they expect they and partners can get for those new GPUs. So while any additional production will at least help the current situation to some extent, I would caution against getting too hopeful about AMD’s ramp-up bringing the video card shortage to an end."
    I still think both Nvidia and AMD need to lock down the GPU's to assure production % more than adequate to gamers at MSRP.

    Then the rest of the GPU production they can gouge the miners 2x-10x.

    If there aren't enough GPU's for the miners, let them wait, don't make individual PC Gamers looking to build gaming systems for them and their friends.

    For every greedy miner with dozens or hundreds of GPU's, those greedy bastards are side-lining tens of thousands of individuals that just want 1 or 2 GPU's for their gaming rigs.

    That just isn't right, and it's gotta stop.
     
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  5. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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    Mining with CPU instead of GPU.
     
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  6. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Now that's taking the p... Sewage plant 'hacked' to craft crypto-coins
    Mining Monero on SCADA networks? Why can't you kids be normal and just DDoS
    By Iain Thomson in San Francisco 8 Feb 2018 at 19:51
    https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/02/08/scada_hackers_cryptocurrencies/

    "Updated: Infosec bods say they have uncovered what's thought to be the first case of a major industrial control system network infected with cryptocurrency-mining malware.

    SCADA security outfit Radiflow claimed today it found the software nasty lurking in computer systems at a water treatment facility.

    Several operational servers used to monitor and regulate critical water supplies were found to have been infected with code that secretly harvested Monero cyber-dosh and sent the coins over the internet to its masterminds, we're told.

    The malicious software was, we're told, chewing up processor time, noisily shifting data over the network, and potentially exploiting the fact that industrial networks tend not to be running the latest security patches – typically because they oversee critical processes that cannot be interrupted or knocked out by bad updates.

    In short, it's not particular great to see malicious code running that near important systems. Luckily, it was just mining Monero rather than anything more sinister.

    "Cryptocurrency malware attacks involve extremely high CPU processing and network bandwidth consumption, which can threaten the stability and availability of the physical processes of a critical infrastructure operator," said Yehonatan Kfir, chief tech officer at Radiflow.
    "PCs in an OT [operational technology] network run sensitive HMI [human-machine interface] and SCADA [supervisory control and data acquisition] applications that cannot get the latest Windows, antivirus and other important updates and will always be vulnerable to malware attacks."

    The malware family caught on the water utility's equipment wasn't named, and it sounds relatively sophisticated – more than a JavaScript miner running on a webpage on someone's laptop. It used obfuscation techniques, we're told, such as shutting down any installed antivirus tools, and was designed to be stealthy to maximize its moneymaking before it could be discovered.

    The software nasty was apparently spottedthanks to researchers noticing unusual spikes in HTTP connections to the outside world from the infiltrated hardware, and the computers trying to send data to servers already identified as malware command-and-control machines. The hidden miners have since been removed from the sewage plant's systems, it is claimed.

    Currency mining infections are fast becoming the preferred method for online scumbags to make a fast buck. Even ransomware is losing ground to mining infections, thanks in part to people keeping better backups and antivirus tools becoming more effective at blocking extortionware.

    There's no word on how the malware got onto the SCADA network in the first place. It was either placed there by a rogue employee, via an open hardware port, or possibly through a network service left open by a careless admin.

    We've pinged Radiflow, based in New Jersey, USA, for more information – we'll let you know if they get back to us. ®

    Updated to add
    While the cause of the infection is still being investigated, Ilan Barda, Radiflow’s CEO, told The Register today the malware was probably installed after someone used a browser on a server to visit a website they shouldn't have. The nasty would have been accidentally downloaded and run, and it likely exploited network file shares to move through the utility company's computers, we're told. It sounds a lot like a variant of Adylkuzz.

    The plant has not been named due to customer confidentiality agreements.

    "What we see is that it got into one of the servers, and moved across to others using SMB vulnerabilities," he explained.

    "The main problem with systems like this is that they aren't usually properly patched or running security software, so once you get in it's usually easy to infect other computers on the network."

    The mining software, derived from Coinhive's code as usual, was running infected servers' CPUs at very high rates, apparently, and presumably reaping a lot of currency. A standard PC running Coinhive can typically pull in around 25 cents per day, but servers are more powerful and can churn out more crypto-cash.
    Thankfully, in this case the mining code doesn't seem to have affected normal operations at the plant. Radiflow is now working with regulators to lock down the infected network and check for other malware in connected systems."

    UK ICO, USCourts.gov... Thousands of websites hijacked by hidden crypto-mining code after popular plugin hacked
    Biz scrambles to shut down crafty coin crafting operation
    By Chris Williams, Editor in Chief, 11 Feb 2018 at 15:41
    https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/02/11/browsealoud_compromised_coinhive/

    "Thousands of websites around the world – from the UK's NHS and ICO to the US government's court system – were today secretly mining crypto-coins on netizens' web browsers for miscreants unknown.

    The affected sites all use a fairly popular plugin called Browsealoud, made by Brit biz Texthelp, which reads out webpages for blind or partially sighted people.

    This technology was compromised in some way – either by hackers or rogue insiders altering Browsealoud's source code – to silently inject Coinhive's Monero miner into every webpage offering Browsealoud.
    For several hours today, anyone who visited a site that embedded Browsealoud inadvertently ran this hidden mining code on their computer, generating money for the miscreants behind the caper.

    A list of 4,200-plus affected websites can be found here: they include The City University of New York (cuny.edu), Uncle Sam's court information portal (uscourts.gov), Lund University (lu.se), the UK's Student Loans Company (slc.co.uk), privacy watchdog The Information Commissioner's Office (ico.org.uk) and the Financial Ombudsman Service (financial-ombudsman.org.uk), plus a shedload of other .gov.uk and .gov.au sites, UK NHS services, and other organizations across the globe.

    Manchester.gov.uk, NHSinform.scot, agriculture.gov.ie, Croydon.gov.uk, ouh.nhs.uk, legislation.qld.gov.au, the list goes on.

    The Monero miner was added to Browsealoud's code some time between 0300 and 1145 UTC: here's a clean copy of its JavaScript, andthe hacked version. Coinhive's code is mostly detected and stopped by antivirus packages and ad-blocking tools. The miner perishes when you close the browser tab, so if you have visited one of the affected sites, your computer shouldn't be infected: the code only runs while the tab is open.

    [​IMG]
    Scrambled ... A portion of the obfuscated mining code injected via Browsealoud today

    The injected mining code was obfuscated, but when converted from hexadecimal back to ASCII it spelled out the necessary magic to summon Coinhive's stealthy JavaScript miner to the page.

    Defense mechanism
    The malicious code was first spotted by UK-based infosec consultant Scott Helme, and confirmed by The Register. He recommended webmasters try a technique called SRI – Subresource Integrity – which catches and blocks attempts by hackers to inject malicious code into strangers' websites.

    Just about every non-trivial website on the planet loads in resources provided by other companies and organizations – from fonts and menu interfaces to screen readers and translator tools. If any one of these outside resources is hacked or tampered with to perform malicious actions, such as mine crypto-coins, all the websites relying on that compromised resource will end up pulling the evil code onto their pages and into visitors' browsers.

    SRI uses a fingerprinting approach to stop vandalized JavaScript from being imported into webpages. If an internet dirtbag changes a third-party provider's source code, the alteration is detected and blocked by the individual websites using this signature technique.

    Until more websites use this protection mechanism, third-party resource providers – like Browsealoud – will be targeted by criminals to spread miners, or worse, on thousands of websites. A scumbag simply has to hack one provider to effectively infect countless other webpages.

    "Third parties like this are absolutely a prime target and have been for some time," Helme told El Reg today. "There's a technology called SRI (Sub-Resource Integrity) designed to fix exactly this problem, and unfortunately it seems that none of the affected sites were using it."

    A spokesperson for Texthelp told us as we were preparing to publish that it has removed its Browsealoud code from the web while it probes the security cockup, shutting down the illicit Monero-crafting operation.

    "We are addressing this immediately," the biz said via Twitter. "Our Browsealoud service has been temporarily disabled whilst our engineering team investigates."

    Luckily, the injected code was just trying to slyly mine Monero coins – one XMR is worth $238.65 or £172.56 right now – rather than anything more malevolent, such as popping up dodgy ads or tricking people into installing malware.

    Texthelp's altered JavaScript was pulled offline by 1600 UTC today, we can confirm, meaning the affected websites are, for now, back to normal. The UK's ICO has also switched its website to a minimal "maintenance" mode as a precaution."
    [/browser]
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2018
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  7. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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  8. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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  9. BeastsForever.TheDragon

    BeastsForever.TheDragon Notebook Evangelist

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    Huh smartest company? Let me tell you the reality of titan v for instance.

    Pci sig announced openly that volta is a "AI" BASED card with plenty of tensor cores for processing, resulting in more capacity to process data, but you know, the titan v is just not running at its full capacity according to pci sig, reason isn't clockspeeds, but data bandwidth.

    Originally volta was to be released and based on pcie gen 4, but here comes the green team, releasing volta at the time they shouldn't. Thats the reason what pcisig gave, the newer cards are having drastic performance gain at every generation, and can do much better with better data transfer iity, and hence even PCI SIG promised to double the bandwidth speed with every 2 years( coincidence, nvidia releases their new cards every 2 years, iguess not).
     
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  10. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK The Strategist

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