NP9377 stock screen - is it 72% NTSC or 90%? How good is it?

Discussion in 'Sager and Clevo' started by MonarchX, Feb 19, 2015.

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  1. MonarchX

    MonarchX Notebook Geek

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    I want to get NP9377 as I've stated in several threads, but I keep running into more questions than ever. I didn't realize that some screens are bad enough to use wide Gamut or 90% NTSC. I need a regular 60Hz 72% NTSC or sRGB screen. Does NP9377 provide such a screen? Are there any reviews or calibration measurements taken from the stock NP9377 screen?
     
  2. D2 Ultima

    D2 Ultima Livestreaming Master

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    Default screen may be 60% NTSC. Other places allow you to upgrade to 72%. If you don't see the option in Sager, try Mythlogic. Or buy from Eurocom and get the 120Hz screen while you're at it (also 72% gamut).
     
  3. Support.3@XOTIC PC

    Support.3@XOTIC PC Company Representative

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  4. MonarchX

    MonarchX Notebook Geek

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    Damn.... AFAIK 72% NTSC = sRGB, so 60% NTSC = de-saturated colors? Also, what does XOTIC do for calibration? I have my own i1Display Pro and I know how to calibrate software LUT/ICC. Does XOTIC calibrate on hardware-level, using screen build-in service menu's? Are they accessible to customers too?

    Off-topic, but what is the average build time for NP9377?
     
  5. Support.3@XOTIC PC

    Support.3@XOTIC PC Company Representative

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    You are right that 72% NTSC is 100% sRGB, so with a 60% NTSC there is not full sRGB. You probably wont notice de-saturated colors though, most notebook screens are 60%, its the industry standard.

    We do calibrate with Spyder, so you could do it yourself with what you have already.

    Sager always provides a 7-12 business day build estimate. Actual build time does vary depending on the time of year. Right now its a slower time so it will be on the shorter end of the, even possibly less then 7 business days.
     
  6. MonarchX

    MonarchX Notebook Geek

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    Oh guys, for the love of God, please do NOT use Spyder colorimeters. They are very inaccurate and are un-acceptable by the calibrator community. You can purchase i1Display Pro for $250 OR ColorMunki Display for $175, both of which use identical hardware and have identical accuracy, far better than the Spyder series, even Spyder 4 Elite. Don't be fooled into thinking that there is the Pro-level and consumer-level colorimeters. There are only accurate and IN-accurate ones. i1Display Pro is only more expensive than ColorMunki Display due to its compatibility with more software packages, but the best software package is 100% free with no catch and accuracy better than all big-time software packages, like CalMAN, ChromaPure, etc. All you need is ColorMunki Display, free HCFR Calibration (latest version is 3.1.8) for measurements, and free dispcalGUI (with ArgyllCMS) for the actual calibration, which performs the most accurate calibration possible, but it takes about 20-30 minutes to do it. I promise the end-results will look far better than anything you will get with Spyder series...

    And then I wanted to confirm - do you just calibrate and provide an ICC profile or do you access screen's OSD menu and make changes on the hardware level, which would not require any ICC profiles???
     
  7. Support.3@XOTIC PC

    Support.3@XOTIC PC Company Representative

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    I will make a suggestion about taking a look into those other brands, sounds like it may be worth it.

    We just calibrate and include the .icc profile, we do not do anything with the OSD menu or on the hardware level.
     
  8. MonarchX

    MonarchX Notebook Geek

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    Now that G-Sync IPS screens are available for ASUS ROG G751 and MSI G72 or whichever the name of the model was, is there a chance IPS screens will become available for NP9377 through DisplayPort? I only saw TN screens with 60Hz, 120Hz, 90% NTSC, 72% NTSC, 60% NTSC available for this Sager model, but no mention of an IPS screen. Does NP9377 use DisplayPort to connect to its default screen? Its so funny because I used to work as a desktop and laptop repair tech, so I took them apart and all, but if I remember correctly, screens were connected to videocards using an entirely different connection - not HDMI, or DisplayPort or DVI, but this tiny small connector... So then how does ASUS ROG G751 connect to that IPS screen?
     
  9. MonarchX

    MonarchX Notebook Geek

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    Wow, so these screens are so cheap! The TN in NP9377 is some $75 online! That's incredibly cheap and very worrying as you cannot deliver quality for that much. I hope the IPS G-Sync screen is more expensive!
     
  10. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

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    The panels are mass produced and don't require licensing unlike a display with an HDMI connector. They are no sold in boxes and are not marketed. That's where a lot of the cost of modern devices come from. You can make perfectly good screens for that much if you make enough of them.
     
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