Now this is interesting. Sooner than I expected.

Discussion in 'Apple and Mac OS X' started by kojack, Jun 9, 2020.

  1. Aivxtla

    Aivxtla Notebook Evangelist

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    Yeah its definately hard for people to switch to something totally different, not to mention lack of commonly used third party software compatibility and only reletively recently have distros started focusing more and more on new/novice users, in terms of driver updates and software installs.
     
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  2. moon angel

    moon angel Notebook Virtuoso NBR Reviewer

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    That's where I think they are going as well. My prediction for awhile has been that Apple will go fully arm over the next few years and that will spur on third party developers like Adobe to create "full" functionality versions of the software for arm. Once that happens windows on arm will become a much more viable as a lot of the big software will already be working with arm thanks to Devs following where Apple leads.

    I would very much like to see iPad apps available on macOS arm, but given how Apple seems to have been trying hard to keep the two systems separate, I don't see that happening. The best I can hope for is it makes it easier for developers to port the iPad or iPhone apps to macOS for arm.
     
  3. Sentential

    Sentential Notebook Evangelist

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    Honestly I think that is more of a function of iPads not being long for this world. The moment OLED burn-in is fixed and flexible displays are more durable I can see Apple canning this product line completely with an iPhone that morphs into a Pad OS when the screen is extended.
     
  4. moon angel

    moon angel Notebook Virtuoso NBR Reviewer

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    You think so? That's something that hasn't even occurred to me. Given the amount of development in iPadOS trying to make it more like a laptop, all of the smart keyboards and mouse support et cetera they have been adding in I can't see them killing iPads any time soon. There is a huge market for education with the iPad, not just personal devices but institutions buying them en masse to give to students. Doesn't seem likely to me that they are going anywhere.
     
  5. Sentential

    Sentential Notebook Evangelist

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    There's also a massive market for Chromebooks as well within Education. It's not like the things they are doing to PadOS are going to be scrapped; look at what Samsung is doing with Dex. They can kill physical iPads, merge iOS into one build and move on. Despite the animosity it's not like they don't work together routinely for product advancement. I just don't see how iPads can co-exist alongside Chromebook like Macbook non-pros and foldable iPhones with docking capabilities.
     
  6. moon angel

    moon angel Notebook Virtuoso NBR Reviewer

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    I Know exactly what you mean. I have long held the belief that a lot of things could be achieved and set ups could be powered simply by a phone with a Samsung Dex style interface and connection. The cynic inside of me thinks that Apple will hold off on making anything like that as long as possible because at the moment they can sell people three devices for three different tasks instead of one that technically could achieve all three if they set up the software to do so. I personally use Apple because I require the accessibility features, if I didn't I would almost certainly have a Samsung dex capable Mobile phone and a couple of docking stations and monitors. I think it's a fantastic concept but while companies can get away with selling people are three devices for £2000 instead of one device for £750 that's what they are going to do.
     
  7. Ed. Yang

    Ed. Yang Notebook Evangelist

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    If one another accessory maker reverse engineers this...

    ...NexDock to be neutral and open to accommodating to different mobile OSes...
    All the talks on which OS is supreme will be useless.
    Look at the maturity state of OSes now.

    Can the smart phones use external keyboards for text inputs?
    Yes. But not on economical ones where the OS are not "full".
    Can the smart phones use external pointing device such as mouse?
    Yes. Again, not with economical ones where the OS lack of such generic drivers.
    With the 2 above, plus the ability to screen cast(for non USB-C devices), all the product designer needs to come out, is a keyboard+display panel "no OS mirroring accessory" that's neutral to all OSes out there. They need not to concern whether their "no OS display-book" will be limited by the license or rights restriction that's limited to certain mobile phone makes...​
     
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  8. jclausius

    jclausius Notebook Virtuoso

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    "Apple confirms Mac transition to ARM CPUs, Rosetta 2 Intel emulation"

    - To support old and new apps, Apple will use Rosetta 2, integrated emulation software, to enable ARM-based Macs to run Intel code.

    https://venturebeat.com/2020/06/22/apple-confirms-mac-transition-to-arm-cpus/


    That answers that. Since the emulation will be running inside OS X, there will be no more Bootcamp. I'm sure some of my dev colleagues will be disappointed to hear it.

     
  9. jclausius

    jclausius Notebook Virtuoso

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    "Rosetta 2 lacks support for x86 virtualization, Boot Camp not an Apple Silicon option"

    - While [...] Rosetta 2... can translate "most" Intel-based apps, it is unable to do the same for virtual machine apps that handle x86_64 computer platforms. Popular x86_64 virtualization apps include products from Parallels and VMWare that virtualize Windows environments.

    - In addition to Rosetta's x86 restrictions, Boot Camp will no longer be available for use on Macs powered by Apple silicon.

    https://appleinsider.com/articles/2...apps-boot-camp-not-an-option-on-apple-silicon


    We had already guessed Bootcamp was going bye-bye. But I wasn't expecting a lack of virtualization. Unless this changes, there goes that segment of the market for software developers looking at the new ARM Macbooks for development. No Fusion or Parallels? That's not going to go over well with the software coder brethren that like to code on Macbooks. Oh well. At least they can maybe purchase one or two more models before x86 is phased out completely.

    The comments in that article are definitely revealing.

     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2020
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