Now this is interesting. Sooner than I expected.

Discussion in 'Apple and Mac OS X' started by kojack, Jun 9, 2020.

  1. Sentential

    Sentential Notebook Evangelist

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  2. jclausius

    jclausius Notebook Virtuoso

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    That's exactly my point. Losing Bootcamp would be a big issue in some corners of the world. For example, of the developers I know who use Macbooks, they rely on it in one way or another.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2020
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  3. jclausius

    jclausius Notebook Virtuoso

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  4. Raidriar

    Raidriar ლ(ಠ益ಠლ)

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    Moving to ARM would further isolate Apple from the rest of the PC world as nothing desktop grade is currently written for ARM. Microsoft tried this a while back with the Surface and Windows 8 RT. Apple's CPU design has been very robust and it works very well for iphone and ipads. As a dev in the Microsoft environment, I can tell you there is some kind of push coming to move to .NET Core which is "universal" supposedly and run on any platform. I don't think it will be prime time ready immediately, but probably within the next 2-5 years you can expect to see Apple-ARM designed CPUs and GPUs in their computers.

    However, it would totally suck for anybody that uses a macbook for windows development (though, I really wouldn't understand why somebody would do that to start with). Bootcamp would essentially be dead.
     
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  5. kojack

    kojack Notebook Virtuoso

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    That is exactly what they are going for IMO. A fully closed system. iPad iPhone and MacBook with no interference from outside operating systems. If users don't like it, they can move on. That's how I see that one. I think that is where apple is going.
     
  6. jclausius

    jclausius Notebook Virtuoso

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    Exactly! Like it or hate it, for most developers, it's a Windows world. Most of the dev folks I know who use them, love their Macbooks for dev use, but they do spend a majority of the time in Visual Studio for Mac, Fusion with Win VMs, and sometimes the occasional Bootcamp boot for other reasons. By removing that, the Macbook is a less attractive offering.

    Alienating those folks might cost Apple a bit of a market segment, but perhaps those numbers are too small to matter to them.

     
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  7. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    BootCamp has been on life support for years. This would be a final excuse to kill it off for good.
     
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  8. kojack

    kojack Notebook Virtuoso

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    The market share is so small for apple they would not notice. Now if it were ios that's a different story. That's apple's gravy train and they know it. I would not be surprised if they just make the Mac run ios.
     
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  9. Aivxtla

    Aivxtla Notebook Evangelist

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    It's in certain aspects harder/slower for MS/PC community to make drastic software/hardware changes (ie like the registry, removal of 32bit support etc) unlike Apple on the computing side because the MS dependent side has a significantly larger enterprise base and they also have to deal with the baggage of a lot compatibility issues especially with a large number of companies still using certain older hardware or software. If it was just regular end users they would have been a bit more nimble and force changes.


    Apple with its relatively small market share on laptops/computers can afford to shed compatibility in quicker fashion and even if they lose some users as it's a small loss as the computer business is a relatively small portion of their revenue and not as much of a core component as it used to be with the company now pretty mobile heavy. At the same time they do have a lot more customers now than in the PowerPC/Intel transition days and as some have mentioned the draw for devs due to bootcamp could be gone if ARM transition happens too quickly and without proper x86 emulation. Assuming there aren't major architectural differences between Apple's custom implementation of ARM CPUs and those on the MS/PC ARM side, there might be dual boot ability but x86 compatibility loss would be a big loss for enterprise. I'm not sure if good x86 emulation would be possible in the transition period.

    The core of Win10 has improvements but bugged by lack of testing and the stupid over reliance on part time testers over more dedicated internal testing compared to the past. Even MacOS is buggy as hell right now lol. I fell like I'm stuck between a rock and a hard place. Ubuntu/Mint seem much more stable for daily use, but with a third party software shortage.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2020
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  10. kojack

    kojack Notebook Virtuoso

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    I tried various Linux distros trying to find some flow, and could not get into it at all.
     
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