Notebook for Photographer

Discussion in 'What Notebook Should I Buy?' started by Teendoctor, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. Teendoctor

    Teendoctor Newbie

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    Great points! I think that many assume that I will be editing on the notebook itself but I doubt that I will alter my workflow so substantially to do that. I like using my large monitors to pixel peep, thus that will be my primary editing mechanism.

    I'm sensing that you prefer the ThinkPads over the Dell XPS?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Teendoctor

    Teendoctor Newbie

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    I'm a portrait photographer who does family and child work and occasionally dabbles in school photography. (I shot my kid's school for the past two years).

    So my follow-up question for you is how much the laptop screen matters when you will primarily use the laptop docked while editing using an IPS monitor? I understand that it will be important when I am traveling or am at my other house and am relying on the laptop screen itself, but that will happen less frequently than screen editing.

    I shoot RAW so I import large files and work back and forth in Lightroom and Photoshop. I do not do weddings, so I edit on my own time after the shoot. I have thought about doing my school shoots while tethered using my not great old work laptop (since I didn't have a dedicated laptop other than that one), but was afraid some preK kid would trip and bring the whole thing crashing down. I can shoot tethered in my home studio using my current desktop.

    My school shoots produce 1500-2000 files and my portrait sessions are around 250-500 files per shoot.

    Does this additional information help?
     
  3. Teendoctor

    Teendoctor Newbie

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    I will have to see. I'm one of those who never got used to her Wacom tablet. It seemed to slow me down tremendously. But I am open to trying again with a touchscreen.

    Thanks!
     
  4. kojack

    kojack Notebook Deity

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    I love editing with my 2 in 1 dell. I only have a cheap one, the 13 5000 and it has not true pen functionality...but even with a passive stylus it's a boon for quick editing etc...very fast and direct.
     
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  5. Fluffyfurball

    Fluffyfurball Notebook Geek

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    The Lenovo Thinkpad P51 has a touch screen variant, which I own. The screen is glossy with a slight milky haze to it. I presume that's just how it is. I have no other complaints. The touch screen and digitizer pen work fine.

    I use the laptop docked to edit photographs so the weird looking display is not much of an issue for me.
     
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  6. ZaZ

    ZaZ Super Model Super Moderator

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    I think they're both good choices, depending on what you want, need or like.
     
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  7. kojack

    kojack Notebook Deity

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    I think the XPS is the better device of the two. There is no Milkiness to my screen and that's just a cheaper dell 2 in 1.
     
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  8. Fluffyfurball

    Fluffyfurball Notebook Geek

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    Yeah, but my Dell 7568 (15 inch) 2 in 1 digitizer screen died 1 month out of warranty. The Dell does have a nice display, but it's no use to me dead. :)
     
  9. penguinslider

    penguinslider Notebook Consultant

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    If you don't think you will be editing much on the road then screen quality does take a seat back. Though I would still recommend getting laptop with a good screen while traveling because you will be reviewing your work as you go and you will be looking at other people's pictures.

    Looking at your workflow, you are kinda at the edge there of becoming a power user. Importing RAW files into Lightroom is very processor intensive and though you say that you can take your time to edit, I would still recommend getting a laptop a with a quad core processor which kinda rules out the super thin and light machines.

    In terms of recommendations, I have two. While these two have touch screen options, I would personally do without them so I can get a matte screen.

    1. Dell XPS15 or sister machine which I prefer, the Dell Precision 5520.
    • This option is if you want to prioritize weight and size for travelling. Starting weight 3.93lbs (1.78kg). This is a 15.6" laptop in a 14" form factor.
    • Gorgeous screen and good build quality.
    • While it can be configured to have powerful processors, lots of RAM and a okay GPU, this laptop is more for quick bursts of high performance than for hours of continuously having the processor at 100%. This is because the laptop design sacrificed cooling capability for portability.
    • If you are willing to sacrifice battery life and get the smaller battery, it will allow you to have a dual hard drive setup. You can have smaller but faster SSD as your primary drive while you can have a larger regular spinning hard drive for long term storage. If you have the budget, even 2 SSDs are possible for lots of storage space so you don't have to worry about carrying an external hard drive.
    2. Dell Precision 7520.
    • This option is if you want the absolute best performance and build quality. I actually have the old version, the 7510 for myself and I love it. Starting weight 6.16lbs (2.8kg).
    • Good screen options.
    • Strong processor, Very good Cooling capability, decent GPU and LOTS of space for RAM. I don't have the times for them but importing and exporting RAW files in Lightroom is a breeze even when I am working on other things.
    • The build quality on this laptop is great. You can use it as an impact weapon to smack kids if they get too close to your gear.
    • This machine can also have a dual hard drive setup and still have the larger battery. And again, if you have the budget, you can even have 2 SSDs in there.
    • Easy to upgrade hard drives and RAM. And because a lot of the parts are replaceable, repairs on this laptop area easier compared to other models.
    • The only real downside of this laptop is that it might be bigger than what you are used to plus the power power supply is quite large as well.
     
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  10. kojack

    kojack Notebook Deity

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    If I was doing photography for a paying gig I would want the BEST screen, touch and storage. XPS 15 again. Or, like I said, the surface book....if you can wait rumor has it that MS is releasing a book 2 next month. That thing should be awesome!
     
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