NEW "What is bothering you right now?" Thread. Bonus: Now with 20% more bother!

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by 2.0, Dec 21, 2014.

  1. Jarhead

    Jarhead 恋の♡アカサタナ

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    Yeah, the regular school system doesn't do well for anyone aspiring to be more than a burger flipper or a pencil pusher. However, since US high schools were originally designed to train factory workers (basic skills plus obedience) and are now no more than glorified teenage daycares, you can say that our system works exactly as intended.

    I'd love to have those GCE 'A' tests you talk about SRSR333. Or at least something that isn't laughably easy as SAT/ACT. Though parents will whine and complain about how their "special child/children" aren't passing and eventually we'll be back to dumber exams or more grade inflation :/.

    If you want an education that's worth a damn, you need to work your way into "gifted and talented" (or "normal" in other developed countries) and have parents who are responsible and caring enough to start teaching you before you're old enough to go to school (seriously, I know of enough kids who didn't learn to read until after they started going to school, let alone anything more advanced like simple arithmetic). If your parent rely solely on the school system for their kid's education, the kid is basically doomed to forever ask "Would you like a medium or a large combo with that?".
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2015
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  2. Ichinenjuu

    Ichinenjuu Notebook Deity

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    Around here, the public schools don't work well for people without motivation. If you're motivated to go to a good college and get somewhere in life, the school have classes and programs that can be taken advantage of, and you can achieve what more or less you want. But if you're from a poorer area, you tend to just fall into the negative cycle, including (around here, at least), drugs and gangs. I mean, I know plenty of people who went to public school, were never particularly amazing in school, but not bad students either, got into good colleges (UCs mostly), and now live in SF and work at Facebook and Google and Yelp. So they must be doing something right.
     
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  3. Jarhead

    Jarhead 恋の♡アカサタナ

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    Lots of self motivation and self education. Really, with the Internet this should be trivial, even in poorer areas, but apparently it is just too hard to browse around Wikipedia or Google or any of the newer free online courses or ebooks.

    The public schools I attended were absolute garbage (well, for the non-AP and non-IB courses anyway). Statistically, I should be asking you what burger you want to order, though that's not the case fortunately.
     
  4. Ichinenjuu

    Ichinenjuu Notebook Deity

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    Well I'm glad you were able to avoid that ;)

    Yeah, it just depends on the area. Schools in Oakland, for example, are known to be some of the worst. (And I did read a recent report about California ranking low in its ability to rid public schools of bad teachers), but if you grow up in a nice area (most of the Stanford Sphere of Influence, for example, i.e. Atherton, Menlo Park, Palo Alto, Los Altos, LAH, Woodside, Portola Valley), the public schools here are known to be above average, and many well above average (middle and lower mainly for that). The high schools do all have a group of kids (who are mostly from the crummier areas) who won't do well there, but if you're motivated, then you're probably going to be fine.

    I'm only speaking on what I know from friends who went to them and things I've read, as I did go to private school, so had a pretty different experience overall.
     
  5. radji

    radji Farewell, Solenya...

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    Don't sell yourself short Jarhead.

    Ichy & I had the luxury (for lack of a better word) of going to private catholic schools. I, however, did not go to Catholic high school. I went to public high school. I was, again, lucky that my high school offered some small percentage of classes that were honors and AP. Make that very lucky, since my high school was at the forefront of some sort of affirmative action and that program took away a great deal of funding from the higher level classes. Otherwise I would have been even more bored than I was.
     
  6. Jarhead

    Jarhead 恋の♡アカサタナ

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    Well, a public school in a better-off area would (and should, really) provide at least a half-decent education. Most districts as far as I know are funded based off property taxes, so education quality is at least partly directly tied with the socioeconomic status or a given area. I can't say much for South Carolina, since most of the state is below-average on both counts (except maybe Greenville and Charleston areas). The districts I went to easily fall under the below category. But hey, I had the Internet and books to read in my spare time outside of class! :D

    Funny enough, I could have also had issues with affirmative action in schools. I originally went to very-minority schools for middle and high school (the district gerrymandered the IB program to the poorer parts of town to not be busted by the Feds via No Child Left Behind) and when I transferred to a ~50-50% school, the only reason why I wasn't denied entry was because I lived in that zone. Otherwise, the district rules would have prevented me from going since the school in question was mostly white already (well, 50% counts as "mostly", apparently).
     
  7. Ionising_Radiation

    Ionising_Radiation ?v = ve*ln(m0/m1)

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    @Jarhead and @radji -

    I've scanned a few pages of my 'A' Level General Paper (essay and comprehension), Maths and Chemistry papers and attached them here. Cover pages for posterity. I can't reproduce the entirety of the papers here for copyright reasons. Sorry for the markings on the papers - these were my actual test papers.

    Visit Imgur link here for all the papers; I can't upload them directly here as there's a 5-uploads-per-post limit.

    For the record - most schools here in Singapore are government schools (where citizens pay a mere $5 to $15 a month). Private schools are usually international schools, or very old schools.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2015
  8. Syndrome

    Syndrome Torque Matters

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    My school was pretty bad. For the most part it was a teenage baby sitting facility. My 11th and 12th year I would skip class for at least 3 or 4 hours a day, and received awards for perfect attendance both years. Algebra 2 was the highest math taught, unless you wanted to independently teach yourself something more advanced, but only 1 or 2 people would do that each year. I graduated with people who were still reading at a 4th or 5th grade reading level. Graduating class of 10 students.
     
  9. Tsunade_Hime

    Tsunade_Hime such bacon. wow

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    Oof that's brutal. Yeah my high school was one the #5 best ranked high school in America (Thomas S. Wootton high school). Of course there are always the dropouts and the ones who can't finish school but its quite rare, and the school counselors literally do everything in their power to get kids to graduate as it is their best chance at having a decent future.You don't have to go to college, but if you have a decent foundation, you can make something out of it. Whereas my junior and senior year were quite the opposite of your experience, I skipped most of my lunches my junior year to help out teachers. My senior year I had to petition our school administrator to drop lunch to take another class (full schedule of AP Biology (double), AP Chemistry (double), 12th grade English, AP Statistics, Multi-var calc, painting elective). She had only done it once for another student.
     
  10. Ionising_Radiation

    Ionising_Radiation ?v = ve*ln(m0/m1)

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    Why does the US not consider education important? And then they end up over-funding and subsidising Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, Colt, Remington to make bombs, planes, missiles and weapons for the pointless wars in the Middle-East.

    Even NASA is under-funded and we're probably never getting to Mars at this rate. At least, the US won't, and it'll be some private company, or an Asian agency getting there first. ISRO is fast becoming a cheap, reliable place to go to launch satellites.
     
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