new SSD boots only when boot USB stick is present

Discussion in 'Samsung' started by Ripcord999, Jul 16, 2017.

  1. Ripcord999

    Ripcord999 Notebook Geek

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    I replaced my internal 1TB HDD with 500 GB Samsung 850 EVO.

    I decided not to clone but I went to install Windows 10 as fresh.

    All went well but I noticed that when I remove my external USB, which I used for installing Windows 10, the SSD doesn't boot.

    It works only when the boot stick is present. Any idea how I could fix this?

    Solution: Use DVD to install Windows instead of USB :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2017
  2. Dannemand

    Dannemand Decidedly Moderate Super Moderator

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    1) Are you installing in UEFI or CSM (legacy BIOS) mode?

    Make sure the SSD's partition style matches that selection: If UEFI make sure the SSD is GPT. If CSM/legacy BIOS make sure the SSD is MBR.

    You can use Minitool Partition Wizard to view the SSD's current partition style. If it doesn't match, you need to convert it (use Minitool for this as well) then install Windows again. Make sure you remove the USB stick when Windows Setup is ready to boot for the first time.

    But frankly, Windows Setup should have converted the SSD as necessary, which makes me wonder if something else is going on.

    2) Does the SSD show up on the Booth Priority page in BIOS?

    If it does NOT show up there, or if you are unable to get into BIOS as all with F2, you may be looking at NVRAM corruption.

    If that is the problem, you are very lucky that you are able to boot Windows (in your case via the USB stick) since you need a running Windows to fix the problem. Again, IF NVRAM corruption is what's going on, you should be very careful not to lose this advantage. I'd say avoid booting or shutting down Windows if you can. Go straight to the guide linked below (link copied from our Samsung forum sticky list) and follow the steps there, except you can skip steps 1 & 3 because you already have a running Windows.

    Unbrick when F-keys don't work at boot, cannot enter BIOS

    3) And then there is the simple explanation that Windows Setup somehow decided to place its boot files on your USB stick instead of the SSD -- which is most likely to happen if it's a newer USB3 stick of the kind that looks to Windows like a fixed drive instead of a removable drive.

    In that case you can try booting Windows Setup again from the USB, then use its repair options. I haven't tried that with Win10, but I assume these repair options are there and that they're self-explanatory.

    Good luck. Please keep us posted on your progress :)
     
  3. Ripcord999

    Ripcord999 Notebook Geek

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    I don't see this in my Bios. This laptop came with Win 7 with free upgrade to Win 8.1 and now in 10.

    Yes. I see it. Also when I boot with USB on, the "Drive management" shows the SSD as "Primary, Boot, Page Partition).

    I am able to enter the Bios.

    Hmm. Will try repair option.

    Now i have removed the SSD and inserted my old Hdd and it works fine without boot stick.

    I'll try the first option.

    Thank you.
     
  4. Dannemand

    Dannemand Decidedly Moderate Super Moderator

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    Thank you for the update.

    If your laptop came with Win7, that means UEFI was disabled from factory. Certainly if you say there is no UEFI option in BIOS (which I would have thought) or if you never enabled any UEFI options in BIOS, that means you are running in legacy BIOS mode. That means, in turn, that your boot HDD/SDD must use good old MBR partition style.

    If the new SSD was delivered using GPT partition style, that would explain the behavior you are seeing.

    Again, use Minitool Partition Wizard to verify that indeed the SSD is GPT (since otherwise the problem is elsewhere), change it to MBR, then re-install Windows.

    The fact that you are able to get into BIOS with F2 indicates that your laptop is NOT suffering from NVRAM corruption -- which is great, since that would have been the worst case.

    So you're on a good track here :)
     
  5. Ripcord999

    Ripcord999 Notebook Geek

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    I installed Mini Partition Wizard 10. How can I se the GPT? I don't see anything in properties.

    Diskpart shows the following

    DISKPART> list disk

    Disk ### Status Size Free Dyn Gpt
    -------- ------------- ------- ------- --- ---
    Disk 0 Online 931 GB 6144 KB
    Disk 1 Online 22 GB 3072 KB
    Disk 2 Online 465 GB 1024 KB

    Disk 0 - 1TB HDD
    Disk 1 - 22GB iSSD
    Disk 2 New SSD
     
  6. Dannemand

    Dannemand Decidedly Moderate Super Moderator

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    I've been away from my PC since my last post, and I am afraid I don't remember Minitool's menus off the top of my head. It should be fairly straightforward, though.

    But from your DISKPART list, it doesn't appear that the SSD is GPT -- which would indicate the problem is elsewhere. If you want to give it a try anyway, you can use CONVERT MBR in DISKPART.

    Alternatively you can use Windows Disk Management: If it gives you an option to Convert to MBR when you right-click the Disk (NOT the partition, the disk) then that means it's currently GPT.

    Just know that your SSD will be completely wiped if you convert it. You will start with a blank SSD and need to install Windows anew.

    Just to check one last time: The SSD is selected under Boot Priority in BIOS, right? I apologize, I know that's trivial, but I have to ask :oops:

    Edit: Oh, another trivial one: Make sure your System/MSR partition (usually 100MB just in front of your Windows partition) is marked Active. You can use DISKPART, Windows Disk Management or Minitool for that. But seriously, something must have gone badly wrong during Windows Setup if the System/MSR partition and its boot store aren't properly set up. You said you'd already tried Windows Setup's Repair options, right?

    It can be fixed with BCDBOOT and BOOTSECT commands, but I'd say re-install Windows instead as other things could be wrong as well in that case.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2017
  7. Ripcord999

    Ripcord999 Notebook Geek

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    Actually the MiniTool tells me I can only convert from MBR to GPT. I see in properties that SSD is "MBR".

    Will try this.

    Yes I see in the Boot Prio. Also you are helping a random person so you don't need to ask apology :). Thank you for the help.

    I guess I will start all over again. The SSD wasn't initialised. I used the Windows Drive Management to initialise.
     
  8. Ripcord999

    Ripcord999 Notebook Geek

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    @Dannemand

    OK. I did the following:
    I reactivated the SSD as MBR and tried to start Windows 10 all over again. I installed it and after the first reboot the PC is looking for the USB boot disk.

    This is what I see during install. The SSD 500 GB.

    https://imgur.com/a/4uOtK

    After the first restart, I see this https://imgur.com/a/lPCN2


    Here is the ssd (connected via USB) from the disk management https://imgur.com/a/yz5tb

    Here is the view from mini partition tool https://imgur.com/a/67qbW

    As you can see it show the SSD and the DVD drive. Selecting SSD comes back to same screen.

    any ideas?

    Thank you!
     
  9. TANWare

    TANWare Just This Side of Senile, I think. Moderator

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    Your issd has an active partition, this is what may be killing it. fully reformat the issd. What happens is at boot the issd does not exist but once the bios initializes the issd comes alive and grabs the system as the active partition. of course it can not boot from the issd so the system needs the usb to initialize the primary drive.
     
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  10. John Ratsey

    John Ratsey Moderately inquisitive Super Moderator

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