New LG Gram 17

Discussion in 'LG' started by vvb8890, Jan 16, 2019.

  1. palatkik

    palatkik Notebook Consultant

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    Which version of Win10 should I now have? When I go to settings it says I'm up to date with 1809 but when I just installed Win10 on a VMWare virtual machine on the same laptop it loaded 1903?

    Can anyone help me understand why please?
     
  2. hfm

    hfm Notebook Virtuoso

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    Microsoft is rolling it out iteratively, you'll get it eventually. If you want to force it you can download the update assistant from them to update it, I forget where it is exactly just google it.
     
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  3. hfm

    hfm Notebook Virtuoso

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    For anyone that cares, LG is having a sale on the entire Gram line again and the Gram 17 is $200 off this time at $1499. If i would have known this was going to happen I would have waited a few months. No regrets though, for sure.
     
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  4. Pflugshaupt

    Pflugshaupt Notebook Geek

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    Some more pictures from my HW cooling modding attempts. I bought some copper sheets and chipquick low temp solder paste as well as various heatpipes. I am now using what is basically a toaster oven to solder things together. The first thing I found out was that 1mm thick heatpipes cannot be heated to 140 degree celsius. They become round again. However 2mm and thicker work just fine.

    I modified the original heatpipe assembly with a copper plate soldered to my extra fins. On top I added 3 2mm thick heatpipes and on the cpu contact area a 0.3 mm shim. I baked it and got this:

    orig heatsink modified top.JPG orig heatsink modified shim.JPG
    To be able to install the thing I had to remove some more material from the chassis where the fins go.

    chassis material removal.JPG


    Using these mods I got quite a big performance improvement. The shim unfortunately broke my motherboard cpu mounting posts as I posted earlier, but since then I found a better solution I'll cover in a future post.

    However this heavily modified assembly is not enough to run the machine at its full performance. It definitely is enough to run at 15W, but I was aiming for 25W at the time and this only got me to about 24W.

    Using a thermal camera I found that the heatpipe and fins only get to about 65 C even if the CPU is at 90. And the fan maybe just does not move enough air.
     
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  5. Pflugshaupt

    Pflugshaupt Notebook Geek

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    After this I did something completely different. I added a copper sheet to the underside of the laptop and a thermalpad on top of the CPU. This way heat could go directly to the copper sheet. This allowed the machine to turbo at 30W for quite some time. Then of course the bottom would get quite hot. I used a 0.5mm thick copper sheet and this added almost 100g of copper to the machine.

    copper plate.JPG
    copper plate contact.JPG

    I removed this extra sink again because I felt the laptop gets too heavy with it. However If someone just wishes to turbo for longer, adding some copper weight on top of the CPU could be a solution. It does work and prevents the CPU from going to 90 degree almost immediately under heavy load.
     
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  6. Pflugshaupt

    Pflugshaupt Notebook Geek

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    Later I received a more powerful fan (from a DELL XPS) and started doing experiments with that. I 3d modelled and printed a tool to bend flat heatpipes (known to be almost impossible).

    heatpipe bending tool.JPG

    I constructed a heatsink assembly from scratch using another array of fins and a 3.5 mm thick heatpipe. I baked things together in the oven.

    custom built hs v1.JPG custom build hs v1_2.JPG

    I then tried to run the dell fan and this new heatpipe assembly, but that's where I hit another roadblock. Somehow the LG Gram 17 fan controller got extremely confused by the dell fan. Maybe I broke it somehow, but the result was very odd fan behaviour where it would slow down at maximum heat. I guess the controller reads the speed of the fan and expects values in the correct range or somehow recalibrates itself with that. Or maybe the pwm signal is custom tailored for the specific fan and just doesn't work on the dell.

    So I had to come up with another plan. Here's what's inside my machine now:
    dell fan + trinket.JPG

    It's the dell fan, but it is driven by a micro arduino (adafruit trinket). The fan speed is controlled by reading the temp using a 10kohm thermistor attached to the underside of the heatpipe. The system fan port is used for 5V power only now. If anyone is interested I would be happy to share code and stuff. It was particularly tricky to get the trinket to output the correct 25kHz pwm signal for the fan.

    Overall this works rather well, but it's still not enough to cool 30W - more like 28W or so. The dell fan is louder and it is too thick and cannot pull in air from the underside. So I am already building another solution at the moment using very flat dual fans. I'll post more once it is done.

    What I really would like to achieve is getting fan control from the OS. Unfortunately there don't seem to be any internal USB connectors that could be rerouted and I don't want to sacrifice any of the usb ports. So what I am playing with at the moment is a bluetooth low energy arduino and I'd like to add fan control over bluetooth in the future. Then the real CPU temp could be used to speed up the fan.

    I am also building another heatsink assembly where the heatpipe is a lot closer to the cpu surface. In the pictured one, everything sits on a 0.8 mm copper plate and there's also a 0.3 shim. I think this limits the heat transfer to the heatpipe a bit. You can also see my new mounting solution using a screw from the bottom. The resoldered one broke again...
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2019
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  7. Pflugshaupt

    Pflugshaupt Notebook Geek

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    In other news, I'll update the helper I wrote soonish. I am seeing some problems with it. At some point my keyboard stopped working! I'm probably hammering the EC with too many read requests or maybe it's a problem when the machine wakes from sleep.
     
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  8. Pflugshaupt

    Pflugshaupt Notebook Geek

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    Oh.. and I forgot to brag with my Cinebench R20 score. Using the pictured mods I achieve 1901 CB.

    cinebench with dell fan + trinket.JPG
     
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  9. jeremyshaw

    jeremyshaw Big time Idiot

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    Very nice!

    How did you secure the copper shims/plates and the heatsink fins to the heatpipe? Just regular solder (or is there a thermal solder?)?

    Does the fan actually require ~25k Hz range for PWM? I remembering doing something similar with a Noctua, [EDIT: nevermind. We adjusted the duty cycle from 20% to 100% at 980Hz, you can guess this was a regular old AVR3028 Arduino].

    Though that is a standard PC fan, not a custom notebook fan. It's probably safe to assume you already probed the fan range using a scope :D

    EDIT2: Whoops. Found the Intel ATX spec sheet. 25kHz is correct. I'm surprised the my responded correctly.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2019
  10. Pflugshaupt

    Pflugshaupt Notebook Geek

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    I used chipquik low-temperature solder (melts at 138 C). Good heatpipes survive temperatures up to 150 C.

    The fan I am currently using does seem to require 25 kHz. Different fans have different levels of pickiness when it comes to pwm speed. But if something in the audible range is used, noise is often an issue. This dell fan just can't process low freq pwm signals at all and turns at random speeds. I have some other fans that work with default arduino pwm speeds, but a hum is audible (I guess from turning the motor off and on again).

    Luckily the ATTiny85 in the adafruit trinket (as well as other higher-clocked variants) can supply precise 25 kHz pwm signals. It does require timer register programming and in this case it got rather tricky as there is only one timer with the necessary capabilities on the chip and it's normally used for system timings. Full featured arduinos could use an extra timer and then things would be easy but initially I went for the trinket to get low power consumption. I could redo the current state with just an attiny85v and then it would use almost no power for the fan control.
     
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