NEW Gigabyte P34 V2

Discussion in 'Gigabyte and Aorus' started by IKAS V, Mar 16, 2014.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Laptopnub

    Laptopnub Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    5

    Thank You Sebi for your quick reply. Have a great day
     
  2. ajvitaly

    ajvitaly Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Sorry to ask again, but can any current owners check to see if there is a way to disable hyperthreading?
     
  3. ajvitaly

    ajvitaly Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Is that 4-5 degree drop in temps with the undervolt and repaste, or just the repaste? If that is just with the repaste, how much more did the temps drop under load with the undervolt?
     
  4. trambler101

    trambler101 Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    16
    That was just with the repaste (I'd undervolted before that, and reckon it reduced the temperature maybe 1C, but wasn't really checking - the main benefit I saw was that the CPU throttled less under the Intel XTU stress test with the undervolt).

    I've just moved for work, and the ambient temperature here is about 30C, and the laptop CPU temps hover around 50-60C when browsing, etc. (mainly around the 53C mark). Before the repaste and undervolt, in 20C ambient, I was in the high 50s...

    Note: I'm using the Gigabyte fan control on "auto".
     
  5. bigpgg

    bigpgg Newbie

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    5
    Did you try drag the tiles to make extra rows? I just tried mine and I can get 6. You have to make sure that the columns are full before an extra row can be created though.
     
  6. ajvitaly

    ajvitaly Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Thanks for the info. I'm worried about long-term usage and temps with this laptop (on top of my opinion that it's $100 overpriced). Coming from my last laptop that I owned for nearly two years, towards the last several months temps were up considerably despite repasting with high quality TIM.
     
  7. Sebi97

    Sebi97 Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    38
    Messages:
    527
    Likes Received:
    121
    Trophy Points:
    56
    Just did 3DMark11; here is my result.

    This is with core at 1387mHz, voltage at 1.100V. Temperatures are about 83-84 BUT I am on a 21 mm laptop so that is fairly understandable....
    This puts it just above the 870m in the razer blade!!!! Here is that result!
     
  8. Solandri

    Solandri Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    130
    Messages:
    145
    Likes Received:
    86
    Trophy Points:
    41
    I'm gonna disagree slightly with Sebi97 when it comes to drives.

    On top of this, when you have an SSD, swapping is much less painful than with a mechanical HDD. My old laptop had an SSD but only 4 GB of RAM. It would start swapping whenever I fired up Photoshop. But unlike a HDD computer where everything pretty much freezes until it's finished writing to the swapfile, the SSD makes the computer still usable. You can definitely notice it slows down, but it doesn't freeze. It was good enough that I waited several months until there was a good sale on memory before upgrading to 8 GB.

    What you want to do with the drives really depends on how you're going to use the laptop. How much space are you going to need? How much are you willing to pay?

    If you can fit everything in 256 GB (most people can), then you can do as Sebi97 suggests. His idea still works if you can afford a bit more and live in 512 GB. (I'm mostly ignoring the stock 128 GB space because you don't want to fill up a SSD. You want to keep about 20%-30% free. Unlike a HDD where you can overwrite a 0 with a 1 and vice versa, an SSD needs to erase the 0 or 1 first before you can write something new to it. This erase takes a lot more time than writing, so is usually done while the drive is idle. The more free space you have, the more space the drive can erase in the background and have prepped for new writes, and the "faster" it responds. So a 128 + 256 GB setup means you can store about 290 GB of files across both drives. A 128 + 512 GB setup means about 480 GB of files.)

    If you're going to need more space and don't want to pay for a larger SSD, then you will want to replace the default mSATA SSD and keep the 2.5" HDD. The Samsung EVO series is a really good choice for replacing the mSATA SSD because its drivers cache to system memory. This allows it to occasionally exceed the 600 MB/s SATA 3 limit, but more importantly it tremendously improves non-queued reads of small files.

    AnandTech | Samsung SSD 840 EVO Review: 120GB, 250GB, 500GB, 750GB & 1TB Models Tested

    In Anandtech's tests, the drive already produced an impressive 93 MB/s at random 4k reads with no queueing (most competitors are around 30-60 MB/s at this stat). But with caching this improves to 300 MB/s. That's as fast as most SSDs score on this benchmark with a queue depth of 32 (reading 32 different files at once). That's a very significant improvement because the vast majority of your perceived speedup when using a SSD is from this stat. HDDs absolutely suck at it, with only the faster large 7200 RPM HDDs managing to exceed 1 MB/s (yes, one MB/s).

    As for 5400 or 7200 RPM on the HDD, that again depends on what you're going to use it for. I dislike the extra vibration and power draw that comes from 7200 RPM. Energy goes as rotational velocity squared, so the 7200 RPM drive is using about 78% more energy than the 5400 RPM drive. If you're mostly going to store movies and static media on the HDD, then 5400 RPM is more than acceptable.

    But if you're going to be installing a ton of games which won't fit on a 256 GB or even 512 GB mSATA SSD, then you may want the 7200 RPM HDD for running games. Personally, I tend to play the same game a lot for weeks while my other games sit unused. So I'd just keep the 5400 RPM drive, and copy the game of the week onto the SSD and run it off the SSD.
     
  9. chris_laptopfan

    chris_laptopfan Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    102
    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    29
    Trophy Points:
    41
    Wow, quite amazing result. :)
    On the 3d mark page stands 1320Mhz though?

    In any case quite high clock rates. Your VRAM is OCed, too?
    Sorry, for asking you that again and again, but just to get a quite accurate picture of cooling capability : I guess you still use auto fan like always? :D
    Did you already test gaming or benchmarking with turbo fan? What temp difference did you get?

    You guys really make me excited on your videos, as i'm almost sold on that laptop... :D
     
  10. Sebi97

    Sebi97 Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    38
    Messages:
    527
    Likes Received:
    121
    Trophy Points:
    56
    I'm not sure why 3DMark 11 is reporting the core incorrectly, it's running at 1387MHz according to Afterburner. Yes, the VRAM has a +600 OC. I use fan on auto ALWAYS unless I state otherwise ;). Using turbo only shaves a degree or two and I only use it when I'm using a headset where noise really doesn't matter.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page