New Clevos with Max-Q?

Discussion in 'Sager and Clevo' started by pdrogfer, May 30, 2017.

  1. Papusan

    Papusan BGA Filthy = That sucks!! STAHP! Dont buy FILTH...

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    Or Max-Q (1060), Max-Q (1070), and Max-Q (1080) :rolleyes:
     
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  2. Blacky

    Blacky Notebook Prophet

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  3. sicily428

    sicily428 Donuts!! :)

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    Blacky likes this.
  4. Blacky

    Blacky Notebook Prophet

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    Guess I have to make more friends :D.
     
  5. Willem1990

    Willem1990 Notebook Enthusiast

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    How is the thermal set-up? no heat issues?
     
  6. W00d_m3

    W00d_m3 Notebook Enthusiast

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  7. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

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    Yep that looks to be one :)
     
  8. Ramzay

    Ramzay Notebook Connoisseur

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    Because you can't do the exact same thing on a laptop as you can on a desktop.

    1. The best laptop display panel pales in comparison to the best desktop panel
    2. The best laptop keyboard is vastly inferior to the best desktop keyboard (maybe an exception for those few laptops that use an actual desktop mechanical keyboard)
    3. The amount of overclocking you can do on a (very expensive) laptop is still typically less than what you can do on a (very cheap) desktop. Thermals and power limits being what they are.
    4. Even when run at stock, many laptops will still hit a thermal/power limit and throttle when under heavy load
    5. Pretty much any desktop motherboard can run SLI - you need an expensive (and heavy) laptop to do the same, and even then, you run into issue #3
    6. A desktop is usually fully modular. Aside from a few select laptops, the most you can do is change out your RAM/SSDs.
    The list goes on, by the way.

    What a laptop gives you is portability. That's it. And in return for this portability, you have to give up...well, almost everything else, to a certain degree.

    I mean, if all you do is write a few emails and browse the web, you could make the case that the laptop is about on par. But for any heavy usage, we're still not at the point where a laptop performs on par with a desktop. Even when you find a laptop that performs on par with a desktop at stock clocks, you can easily OC your desktop, get more performance, and it'll still run cooler and quieter than your laptop. For a lot less money, too.
     
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  9. Ramzay

    Ramzay Notebook Connoisseur

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    Sounds like Alienware all over again.
     
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  10. Ramzay

    Ramzay Notebook Connoisseur

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    Pretty much. There used to be a clear segmentation - small, light notebooks for basic productivity work on the go. Then you had big, heavy workstations that could do the heavy lifting. Gaming laptops were built on the design fundamentals of workstations, given the hardware requirements.

    Now people want to merge these - they want a gaming laptop the size of a slim ultrabook.

    The best experience I had with any gaming laptop was with my Alienware 17 R1 (Ranger). Big, bulky and heavy, but its build quality was second to none, and it ran its components (mostly) at 100% while remaining cool and quiet. It wasn't really very portable (big and heavy), but that's the size it needed to be to properly cool its hardware. And it worked. While I wasn't too thrilled about the size, I was VERY happy with its performance (including thermals and noise).

    Now, almost every gaming laptop I try is either too hot/loud or doesn't perform as well as it should (throttling). All because they're too thin. The only way to get that performance and thermal/noise levels I want is to go for one of the "big boys" (Clevo P870, Eurocom Tornado F5, etc.) but then I lose out on the portability I want.

    So I end up getting a thinner/lighter productivity laptop and stick to a desktop for gaming. That way each machine does what it's supposed to, and does it very well.
     
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