New Clevos with Max-Q?

Discussion in 'Sager and Clevo' started by pdrogfer, May 30, 2017.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Glzmo

    Glzmo Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    475
    Messages:
    822
    Likes Received:
    86
    Trophy Points:
    41
    I also undervolted my regular GTX 1080 (Notebook) using afterburner's Voltage/Frequency curve editor and it dropped my GPU temperatures by 10-18°C (I remain in the lower to mid 70°Cs with max UHD load in games, professional rendering applications and stability/stresstests whereas before it would go up to 90°C, throttling like mad and the fans would become rather loud) with Clevo Control Center's "Overclocking" fan profile all while keeping the clocks steady and high (quite a bit more than it would clock without the undervolt) without any throttling and the fans relatively quiet (CPU is undervolted as well). The system has been perfectly stable as well. It takes a bit of tweaking and testing what works for one's GPU until you find a stable and cool sweetspot, but it's definitely possible even with the Stock BIOS provided the silicone lottery hasn't awarded you a turd that requires stock voltage. No need for a "Max-Q" for that, a regular "Min-Q" should do just fine. ;)
     
  2. Ionising_Radiation

    Ionising_Radiation ?v = ve*ln(m0/m1)

    Reputations:
    641
    Messages:
    2,731
    Likes Received:
    2,272
    Trophy Points:
    181
    Good point. They're just marketing and selling a fact of all GPUs as a special feature of Max-Q, and jacking up the price. They ought to just release a tweaking guide for GPUs and be done...

    Anyway, the silicon lottery applies much less to GPUs than CPUs, because of the much higher core count...
     
  3. Beemo

    Beemo BGA is totally TSK TSK!

    Reputations:
    307
    Messages:
    1,229
    Likes Received:
    800
    Trophy Points:
    131
    Is Clevo brewing something new "non MAX-Q BS" or we ain't gonna see a new system anytime soon?
     
  4. Blacky

    Blacky Notebook Prophet

    Reputations:
    1,956
    Messages:
    5,139
    Likes Received:
    903
    Trophy Points:
    281
    So much overclocking potential wasted... Back in the day when I got my M570TU, it was all about overclocking it. I ran my 280M at 580MHz from 500 Mhz stock for 4 years until it kicked the bucket. Temps would get around 80-85C during long gaming sessions and especially during those hot summer with no AC.
     
    jaug1337 likes this.
  5. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

    Reputations:
    8,374
    Messages:
    52,828
    Likes Received:
    15,194
    Trophy Points:
    931
    Back in those days the mobile chips were pre-nerfed meaning they had a lot more headroom. These days they are coming out the box near their desktop counterparts which have less headroom as the cards are clocking themselves closer to the edge.
     
    jaug1337 and Ionising_Radiation like this.
  6. Glzmo

    Glzmo Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    475
    Messages:
    822
    Likes Received:
    86
    Trophy Points:
    41
    I'd rather not have my system card kick the bucket. ;)
     
  7. Blacky

    Blacky Notebook Prophet

    Reputations:
    1,956
    Messages:
    5,139
    Likes Received:
    903
    Trophy Points:
    281
    They all do eventually... they all do . That's why we want MXM video cards.
     
    infex, jaybee83, ajc9988 and 3 others like this.
  8. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

    Reputations:
    6,887
    Messages:
    20,268
    Likes Received:
    25,085
    Trophy Points:
    931
    Did you run any A/B tests for performance with / without the undervolt? To get an idea of the performance cost of the reduction in voltage?

    Maybe test a render for your work before / after and that would give you an idea of the *cost*.
     
    DukeCLR and ajc9988 like this.
  9. quantumslip

    quantumslip Notebook Guru

    Reputations:
    6
    Messages:
    55
    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Depending on how this person did the unvervolt (esp with the newer laptops), the frequency curve can be set in such a manner where the full clock speeds of the GPU can still be achieved with lower voltage.

    And even if the person is not getting full speeds, with thermal throttling out of the way and noise reduction it may be worth it. I hope you can be happy with people who are ok with making this tradeoff.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2017
  10. CedricFP

    CedricFP Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    46
    Messages:
    503
    Likes Received:
    294
    Trophy Points:
    76
    With regard to undervolting, Pascal behaves a bit weirdly and there is something going on behind the scenes which Afterburner doesn't pick up. I've been running A/B tests on my GTX 1080. At 0.950v @ 2012mhz, I score less than 0.975v @ 2012mhz. In both cases the card holds it's maximum clock of 2012 mhz.

    The implication is that something is going on behind the scenes when voltage is set too low.

    A good video of it in action is here:



    That video demonstrates that undervolting your card too low, even if your Pascal card runs the same clocks, is affecting performance due to some internal management of Pascal that Afterburner doesn't report. Either the card is not actually running the set clock on the curve, or cores or shaders or whatever are being dynamically disabled due to the detection of low voltage.

    So the key with undervolting Pascal is to find the sweet spot on the volt/clock line where you're not giving up performance.

    For example, my GTX 1080's sweet spot is 0.975v at 2012mhz. When I raise my voltage to 1v, the score at 2012mhz doesn't improve, but when I lower my voltage to 0.950v, my score at 2012mhz worsens, even though I stay at the same clock speed.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2017
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page