New Acer Aspire V Nitro series

Discussion in 'Acer' started by G-Force, Aug 13, 2014.

  1. Georgel

    Georgel Notebook Deity

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    There is - but I've no idea how to reconnect it if you've cut the battery already...
     
  2. Dantei

    Dantei Notebook Consultant

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    Done. Works fine now. I used wrong screw.

    Anyway, the laptop likes to shut down randomly when using on battery. Sometimes it lasts 30 minutes, other time 30 seconds. Working fine with AC plugged in.
     
  3. Che0063

    Che0063 Notebook Enthusiast

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    Here's the thing

    Dantei you are right, there is a button that cuts of power to and from the battery.

    Inside the chassis, on the motherboard directly beneath the down and left arrow key, is a button.

    This button needs to be pressed down for the motherboard to take or give electricity from the motherboard. For this button to be pressed down, the screw on the other side of the lapto pneeds to be screwed in, 13 cm left from the IO side of the laptop and 11cm from the top where you open the lid.

    The screw is next to the hole that resets the battery.

    At least that is the case with my Acer ASpire V Nitro VN7-572G Non BE with i7-6500U and GeForce 945M
     
  4. Che0063

    Che0063 Notebook Enthusiast

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    Is anyone else having issues with their inbuilt microphone on their Acer Aspire V Nitro?

    Here's samples:

    https://1drv.ms/f/s!ApAVjxZr-dQ_gbVNBoTg62xKBKO8IA

    (Please don't listen to the entire sample of the Mauritius one, it was created for my french oral :p And its embarrasing)

    It is only an issue on Windows 10 Anniversary Builds 14393 and later, not an issue for Windows 10 November Update 10586.

    Does anyone have an idea about how to fix this?

    I've posted this on Microsoft Forums, but a Microsoft enginner gave me basic instructions to update driver, roll back driver, reset laptop, Fiddle with sound settings, etc. And then when they didn't work, basically he ignored me again.


    Microphone quality is crisp ans one of the best I've heard from a laptop, though not with Builds 14393 and later
     
  5. Venkata

    Venkata Newbie

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    I have a 592G. What would be the fan settings for a VN7-592G? Where do I find them?
    If something doesn't go right with the fans, how do I go back to default?
    Thanks!
     
  6. Che0063

    Che0063 Notebook Enthusiast

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    On the recent Acer Aspire V Nitro line of products, the fan control register is in the Embedded Controller (EC)

    148 is the write register, so you need to change the value of 148 whereas 149 is the read register. It essentially reports the fan speed from 255-80, with 80 being 100%

    150 is the write register for the second fan, and 151 is the read register for the second fan.


    If you can't figure it out, simply download Notebook Fan Control, select the profile and you are good to go.
     
  7. Beem Boom

    Beem Boom Notebook Enthusiast

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    Yesterday I have slightly modded my VN7-791G. Did the following:
    1) additional cooling holes on the laptop's bottom side, underneath the right fan (see instructions here: ),
    2) repasting with Arctic MX-2.

    Peak CPU temperature dropped from 97 to 81°C. Fans work significantly quieter. Right fan doesn't start anymore on low load (web surfing, office work).

    AIDA64 Stability Test:
    CPU 97°C --> 81°C, no throttling
    Unigine Valley Benchmark, Turbo Boost disabled (typical game mode):
    CPU 81°C --> 73°C
    GPU 84°C --> 70°C

    I recommend this for everyone. :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2017
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  8. Fbh

    Fbh Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hi guys.
    A local store has the Aspire VN7-593G on sale for $1200 with 16gb of ram and a 256ssd + 1 TB HDD combo.

    Seems to offer a lot of value for the money since most other laptops in that price range (at least where I live) Come with either a 1050 or a 1050ti and this has a 1060.

    Reviews do also seems great.


    Would owners of this device recommend it? I'm going to be using it on a daily basis for both work and fun so it's going to be used for internet browsing and MS office but also for gaming, Photoshop and HD video editing (not on a professional level so I can live with the average color accuracy).

    The only thing making me doing is that I have seen some reviews mentioning heat issues. Not that it's shutting the PC down or anything but it does make me worry that it might affect the "life expectancy" of the device. My last laptop lasted me for 7 years and I'm looking for something that's also going to live for several years.

    Thx.
     
  9. Che0063

    Che0063 Notebook Enthusiast

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    Like what every other technician says,laptops have protection features that prevent it from overheating, such as shutting down. You say that there is no shutting down issue. That means that the temperatures are in acceptable ranges. Intel rates their mobile Core series CPUs as having a Tjmax of 100C, so you could run it constantly at 90-100C with no issue. Trouble is, manufacturers tend to throttle the CPUs. With my Acer VN7-572g, I have never seen any thermal throttling, only when it reaches 95C.

    I wouldn't worry about temperatures, the area most likely at risk is the fan, since running it at a higher speed will wear it out faster, and more dust will collect

    In short, I really wouldn't mind. The fan will still last many many years. I have had my laptop fro 6 months now and I expect (and hope) for it to last 10 years. With the proper care and maintenance I believe I can reach it

    To add on, I have the mobile Core U processor with a TDP of 15W. When running stress tests, the temperature will go up to 80C. With the GeForce 945M load added on, that rises to 90C. If I get past the 15W limit, I can make my CPU go up to 95C, and that is when it starts throttling.

    I have no idea of the thermal status of the HQ 45W CPUs, but I'm assuming acer will have more robust cooling features that are designed to handle the increased power dissipation necessity.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2017
  10. Beem Boom

    Beem Boom Notebook Enthusiast

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    You are right. There are three troubles with cooling in most of modern "gaming" laptops:

    1. Throttling. We spent our money for the good CPU, but we cannot use its full power. This is a marketing nonsense.

    2. Annoying noise. In case of my Acer VN7-791G, the fan is powerful enough, it honestly tries to decrease CPU temp, but cannot, because of bad thermal paste and deficient area of ventilation holes. This is an engineeric nonsense.

    3. As to laptop lifetime, the trouble is not in the high temperature itself, the trouble is in the periodic temperature jumps from 20 to 100°C. This accelerates natural thermal degradation/erosion of soldered joints, especially for portable laptop, as laptop's mainboard and body are pretty flexible and bendable. Google for BGA solder joint cracking and about the effect of temperature on this.

    By the way, the old laptops, manufactured 10-15 years ago and still alive, didn't have temperatures more than 70-80°C.

    So, don't worry about temperatures, if you buy a new laptop every 2-3 years, or if you don't often put it under hard load. :) But as for laptop that is constantly used for gaming or other heavy work, the probability of fatal failure in 2-3-4 years is very, very high. I worked at electronic repair service years ago, and I know too well about the direct dependency between temperature and durability of electronic components...
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2017
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